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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone! I'm looking to get back into archery having not picked up a bow in about 20 years after becoming an Eagle Scout.

After a few weeks of research (and convincing the wife) I picked up a Diamond Edge 320 Sunday and shot about a dozen arrows yesterday in the back yard and did alright all things considered except for one stray that shot while trying to adjust my head position for the peep sight and forgetting my finger was resting on the release trigger at the time and put it halfway through the fence a few feet above the target. 馃徎. Lesson learned! My yard backs up to a retention area so I'm glad I don't have to worry about much danger to anyone or anything if I really screw up.

Anyway, I found I had some issues holding full draw where I'd let up a lot on pull strength and would have the string start pulling forward more.

I have been worried about pulling too hard on the string after the letoff and was wondering if it's okay to keep a stronger pull with my muscles than necessary or if it could damage something? Or is the letoff something you just learn to better hold as you practice more and build the muscle memory?

As with most things I'm finding the more I learn the more I find I don't know.

Thanks in advance and I'm looking forward to soaking up as much knowledge as I can from you fine folks as I progress in my journey!
 

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The 320 is a great bow.
And highly adjustable.
Lower your draw weight until it doesn't want to "take off" on you while your at,or near full draw.
As for pulling too hard,its called pulling thru the shot,which is a GREAT way to maintain accuracy, and a good habit to keep.
U don't have to yank...just as you reach full draw,keep some tension on the string,like your still pulling it a bit,and continue to do so thru out the release.Your NOT going to damage anything, don't sweat that.
You'll be amazed at how much it improves accuracy with practice.
 

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The 320 is a great bow.
And highly adjustable.
Lower your draw weight until it doesn't want to "take off" on you while your at,or near full draw.
As for pulling too hard,its called pulling thru the shot,which is a GREAT way to maintain accuracy, and a good habit to keep.
U don't have to yank...just as you reach full draw,keep some tension on the string,like your still pulling it a bit,and continue to do so thru out the release.Your NOT going to damage anything, don't sweat that.
You'll be amazed at how much it improves accuracy with practice.
Agreed!

You want to remain dynamic on the backwall. This will not only prevent the bow from "taking off" but make you much more consistent once you get your technique dialed in. Most Pros actually prefer bows with lower letoff (like 65% or 70%) for just this reason. It forces them to be dynamic (constantly pulling). Lower letoff bows (like 85% or 90%) are generally appreciated by hunters, who may have to stay at full draw longer while an animal gets into a favorable position.

I don't know if there is a way to adjust the letoff on your bow. But if there is, it can be a good idea to set it lower. This will help you develop better habits. Low letoff is more comfortable, but it requires a little more discipline because the shooter can easily become "lazy" and just sit at full draw without a dynamic pull

Welcome to the forum!!
 

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Isaiah 6:8
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start with a lower draw weight and let your shoulder build strength over the next few weeks. when the weight is nothing then inc your draw weight by 5lbs and shoot that for a few weeks. also don't get sucked into "you have to draw 70lbs or you're a wimp". I shoot 58lbs and love it, it is plenty enough to kill deer and get good arrow speed. practice, practice, practice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info guys! I have it set to 40lbs which I think is fine for me to start, I just stop pulling altogether really once I get into the letoff because I wasn't sure about continuing to pull with any more force than is required once you get there. I'm going to take this info and do some more practice today to see how it goes and will report back.
 

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Isaiah 6:8
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Thanks for the info guys! I have it set to 40lbs which I think is fine for me to start, I just stop pulling altogether really once I get into the letoff because I wasn't sure about continuing to pull with any more force than is required once you get there. I'm going to take this info and do some more practice today to see how it goes and will report back.
look up videos on youtube (or better yet find a local coach) to learn back tension. it will help you shoot more consistently. go ahead and learn the right form and techniques because it is much harder to break a bad habit. it is something i wish i did when i first started shooting. but overall, just enjoy the sport!
 

Shootin and Cussin
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look up videos on youtube (or better yet find a local coach) to learn back tension. it will help you shoot more consistently. go ahead and learn the right form and techniques because it is much harder to break a bad habit. it is something i wish i did when i first started shooting. but overall, just enjoy the sport!
THIS, THIS and THIS!!!!

I worked with a new relatively shooter last night that was self taught. Most of that came from Duds videos. The guy was lucky to hit the 4x4 target at 10 yards. He even launched his almost new Dud tension release about half way down the range. After about an hour I had him shooting 2" groups at 10 yards and doing very well at 20 yards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Took the info from y'alls replies and also watched a video and applied today. It definitely helped a huge amount! This is at 20 yards and my first practice session Tuesday best I could do was 6-8 inch groups.

Now I need to get it sighted in which I'll work on this weekend (was aiming for the top left bullseye). Thanks again and look forward to hanging around here to soak up some more info and tips!
 

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I did the same thing you are questioning.... Thought the shop setup my bow for 52# to start... was actually 47#... no big deal I took about a 30yr hiatus and had some arrows left over (aluminum) and some carbon I picked up about 10yrs ago when I thought Id get back to it. I have 2 releases I really like, when I started shooting compounds had "wheels" and I shot fingers, the release was foreign to me. I bought a Nock-2-It Silverback after a Trophy Taker II, and HBX, I did not like either of those releases, Bought an HBC and fell in love with it. Worked as I thought a b/t release should... then it seemed I was not improving much... about 60-100 arrows a day. I decided to pull out the Silverback again... over the last 10 days I can see improvement. It's a love hate relationship with the Silverback. It will go off at anytime, or not at all. If you're drawing thru the wall set the tension higher. While the Silverback may be considered a traing release I will train with it for quite a while. I've gotten to a point where even if I overdraw the bow i can still be in scoring range. Also learned that my release hand elbow is not in line with the string... i can release the HBC/ HBX (yes I tried/ have both) no matter where my release elbow is. While I'm not a big fan of the marketing for the Nock-2-It for me I will Stick-2-It. For me it works, and John Dudley, while took me a bit to accept has some of the most informative u-tube videos out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Looks like you are coming along just fine. Great shooting.
Many thanks! I know I still have a long way to go but I'm loving it and look forward to it.

I forgot to show what it looked like the first round Tuesday when I was worried about draw length and afraid anything I did would damage my bow so here you go for comparison (including the trigger learning experience). Did 10 arrows then and 20 total today.

Trying to ease myself into it.
 

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Check out John dudleys video series on YouTube. I can鈥檛 remember how many there are but when he did them he put out one a week and gave homework for the week between. Being able to shoot at home you should be able to do the 鈥渉omework鈥. Week one is about shooting strength. I watch them anytime I feel me shooting is just a little off, follow the program week by week and it seems to fix whatever was wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Check out John dudleys video series on YouTube. I can鈥檛 remember how many there are but when he did them he put out one a week and gave homework for the week between. Being able to shoot at home you should be able to do the 鈥渉omework鈥. Week one is about shooting strength. I watch them anytime I feel me shooting is just a little off, follow the program week by week and it seems to fix whatever was wrong.
You're at least the second person to mention Dudley so I'll definitely start checking those out. Appreciate the response, man.
 

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You're at least the second person to mention Dudley so I'll definitely start checking those out. Appreciate the response, man.
Make it 3 then. Search for his "School of Nock" series. I thinks it's about 12 weeks or something like that this a different thing to work on every week.

One piece of advice I would give is to try and find some way to elevate your target to shoulder height. It's pretty easy and inexpensive to make a stand out of PVC pipe to hand a bag target. It's a lot harder to develop good form while shooting at a downward angle. When you are starting out you want to she shooting with your bow arm level. Once you have built decent form, start learning to maintain that form while shooting uphill and downhill.
 
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