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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Martin Stick longbow in used condition. When I received it, I looked it over for surface scratches. Everything looked good to me. I was out shooting it last night, and I noticed what looked like a crack in the wood under the glass laminate. I can't tell for certain if that is what it is, it looks like it might be some glue that was on the front of the wood when the glass was put on it, but the shape that it is makes me really suspicious.

What is the most common type of failure with traditional bows? If there were signs of stress on the limbs what would they look like? Would they appear on the outer layers or in the inner layers?

Thanks,
Justin
 

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Ritz -

You're gonna have to show it in person to someone who KNOWS about stuff like that, or send it back to Martin for an eval. Unless it's something really obvious, it can be hard to tell over the net. And yes, it can range from nothing to worry about to a time bomb.

BTW - Sorry, but the Martin Stick is a pretty bad choice for a first "stick" bow.

Ciper 1 out.
 

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Martin Stick bow

This is a little off topic but when I got decided to get a longbow (5 weeks ago) I tried that stic bow and almost gave it up right there. Well I decided to get a much better used bow and give traditional a try, when the bow showed up I was shocked at the difference between that bow and the one got. If this one doesn't work out for you and you can get your money out of it, then look for a used bow in the 300$ range, the Martin savannah is one of the best in this range. This is just my opinion so I hope not to offend. Remember I'm just new at this too.
 

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Why did the previous owner sell it?

Is that person even aware of your concern, they may have been shooting it for years and never even noticed. But, that said, absolutely get it checked out by someone, in person, that can give you a qualified opinion.

A fellow that I shoot with just bought one, normally a compound shooter, and he is doing very well with the stick... to the point where I'm considering using a pair of scissors on his string.

:embara:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What makes the Stick a not so good option for beginning traditional shooters?

Darkwolf, I have not contacted the person who I purchased the bow from. He told me that he only used it for one season, and had no problems with it.

When I look at what I think is the crack, it is the same size whether it is strung or unstrung. There is a Traditional 3D shoot this weekend, I am sure that there will be a couple qualified people there who would be willing to take a look at it for me.

Thanks for the quick responses.
 

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Ritz -

The "Stick" was originally designed as an entry level KID'S bow and Martin later decided to offer it in higher weights for adults. I've shot them from #35 to #55 (+/-), and they all stacked at my 29" draw, the handshock was unacceptable, the grip intorable and the cast, well, there really wasn't any to speak of. Given the 2008 price, anyone could do a lot better for less. Could it be tweaked to be "acceptable"? Maybe, but IMHO, just not worth it for someone who is taking their shooting at all seriously.

As far as it being an acquired taste (sorry HP) , I guess getting used to poking yourself in the eye can be an acquired taste as well. Comparing it to other Martins or most other bows, it really is a horrendous bow to shoot. Now, if it's the only bow you've shot, you might want to try a few others.

I VERY rarely bad mouth a bow, but this is one of the exceptions.

Viper1 out.
 

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Viper1, just a thought, if we never had terrible, how would we judge mediocre, good and excellant. Every bow has its purpose, if only as the bottom rung on the ladder of excellance. I'm really bored today, so pardon the drivel!
 

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Viper1, just a thought, if we never had terrible, how would we judge mediocre, good and excellant. Every bow has its purpose, if only as the bottom rung on the ladder of excellance. I'm really bored today, so pardon the drivel!
OT:

Well, if one is going to get philosophical, I'm not sure I agree that we must have "bad" to have good, even if bad can help us appreciate the good more.

Do you have to have been poor to enjoy being rich? Perhaps you'd appreciate it more, but I think the rich are feeling just fine with or without having been or caring about the poor.

Do you have to have dark to have light? No. You might have to have bright to have brighter. You might have to have good to have better. But you don't need to have bad to have good.

But its a debatable point one can argue either way and never resolve.
 

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Hello WSmitty,

Viper1, just a thought, if we never had terrible, how would we judge mediocre, good and excellant. Every bow has its purpose, if only as the bottom rung on the ladder of excellance. I'm really bored today, so pardon the drivel!
Ok, lets look at it a different way...

You are rafting in the grand Canyon... your outfitter has all these very well made rafts.

The differences of the rafts are measured in ability to withstand rock punctures, ability to hold enough gear for the trip, and the ability to maneuver.

When you see 100 guides out of 100 (ones that run the river daily) pick all the rafts but the one you pick, doesn't that make you wonder? Maybe they have seen the problems with the raft that you picked?

Some may not want as much "gear", so they pick "X" raft. Some may like Kevlar rigged boats, some may want something else.

When all said and done, There are some rafts (in this case bows) that are so far out on a limb, that people wonder why they are even made. They are so bad from handshock (compared to other bows), stacking (compared to other bows), and other problems, that it is wiser to just not even touch them.

Thus, even the second rung from the bottom is so far up, that it is comprehendable to the better bows, even with some of its shortcomings. This is not saying that it is any less accurate.

Another example... go out there and purchase a Packard Bell computer compared to another brand. Or purchase a Yugo compared to a Toyota.

Those are bottom rung devices that work (when they work) but are basically worthless. The next rung up is so far, you might as well throw away the bottom rung so you can have a starting point....

DWayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the info. Considering I do not have anything to compare to, this is the best in the world for me right now. :wink:

Sounds like I need to get out some and find a bow that is going to be what I want, and not have any issues as far as limb failure.
 

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Viper, I think the magic phrase is your 29 inch draw, I have a 26 inch draw so stacking has not been an issue. I have shot plenty of other bows and bought the Stick basically as a light weight (both for the draw and the carrying) stumping, small game bow. Do I have other bows for hunting and such? You bet, I was looking for something new and different and found just what I was looking for
 
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