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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understood that the normal average number of fawns is 2 per doe, with occasional triplets and singles. Am I wrong on that?

With only one exception so far, all I have seen is single fawns in our area and quite a few adult does that have had no fawns at all (that I could see). What have the rest of you in NYS been seeing? I'm sure that this sort of thing will vary all over the state, but I'm just curious.

Doc
 

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Same here

Doc
I have noticed the same thing here. A few years back I saw mostly twins and a few trips and a few singles. The last couple years have been mostly singles. This past winter was pretty mild so I would have expected more does to throw twins but it doesent look like they did. I dont know what part of WNY your from but I am from Hornell Wellsville area and the deer pop. seems pretty sparse.
 

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Noticed lots of twins, south of Rochester, between Avon and Geneseo. Also between Canandaigua and Rochester.

I've been to the camp in Arkport a couple times this summer. Scary, have not seen one fawn at all! Deer were sparse there last season too (compared to other years). Especially does, which may account for this years lack of fawns.
I thought with the lower deer numbers and extra carrying capacity, we would see lots of fawns this year. On the bright side, I am seeing more and larger bucks.
 

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Hey Venisonman I live in Arkport and your exactly right I have seen some very nice bucks in the are. Good hunting this fall its coming fast!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I live and hunt in the Bristol area in western NY.

First of all, understand that I am not making any scientific judgements on this. Let's face it, the actual small number of sightings makes any honest conclusions meaningless. But, what few that I've seen seems so lop-sided this year that I just had to ask the question, just out of curiosity. The particular area that I live in has also been hammered pretty badly and deer sightings in general are pretty sparce, especially since we don't have a whole lot of open fields in the area any more. My thought was that with fewer animals, every doe that could, would probably have been bred. I also thought that with far fewer deer per square mile, and a relatively mild and short winter, that I would see more triplets than singles. Maybe when hunting season actually starts, things will look different, but so far it's just a strange set of observations.

Doc
 
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