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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, I am a long time compound shooter looking to get into some traditional shooting for fun. I have been looking at some bows online but not exactly sure what I should be looking for. So far, I have found three samicks to choose from in my price range that I like the looks of, but not sure what technical stuff to be looking at. I am a true 28" draw as measured in the archery shop on a custom recurve. He recommended that I start @ roughly 45lbs, with a 60" minimum lenght bow, so that is what I have been looking at. I would like a bow that I can take down, and change limbs later if desired.

- I would like to hear recommendations of what I need to look at.
- How do I properly measure a riser?
- Can any string material be shot from any bow?
- Can all bows have an elevated rest? or shot from shelf?
- Of these three samick bows, which would most likely be the best choice for me and why? (remember I am new): Samick Phantom 62" Takedown Recurve Bow, Samick Deermaster T/D Bow, Samick Red Stag 60" Takedown Bow.

Thanks in advance for ant assistance.
 

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I hate to give the same old tired reply but unless your strength is considerably stronger than average, you really should start with something lighter than 45#. IMHO, If your goal is to have fun, then any kind of struggle with the weight just takes the fun out of it IMHO.
 

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I can only help you on the deer master. It is a very nice bow for the money

I shoot mine off the shelf, but you could use a rest
 

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SW1:

Take a look at the Quinn Stallion Classic. I would go with no less than a 62", and preferably a 64". As for draw-weight, some will disagree but on a longer 'curve you should be able to learn to handle the 45# draw-weight without great difficulty.

As you are learning to handle the draw-force of a recurve, you will appreciate the longer bows.

Quinn
 

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I hate to give the same old tired reply but unless your strength is considerably stronger than average, you really should start with something lighter than 45#. IMHO, If your goal is to have fun, then any kind of struggle with the weight just takes the fun out of it IMHO.
I know it's the same ole reply and one I mostly agree with. One thing to keep in mind though is this guy is/was a Steel Worker so odds are he's in pretty decent shape.

That said, if you're dead set on one of the above bows then I'd suggest either the Phantom or Red Stag for following reasons:

1) They both list "crowned" shelf for off the shelf shooting where the Deermaster doesn't. Might be an oversight on the website I looked at, might not be. But with the other two you'd least have an option. Nothing says you couldn't put a stick-on rest on a crowned shelf but building up a flat shelf is more difficult and unsightly than a rest stuck on crowned shelf.

2) Both offer a larger variation in limb weights. So while 45# could be a good starting weight for you, having the option of lighter limbs for a long day of shooting or serious form work is nice.
 

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Hey all, I am a long time compound shooter looking to get into some traditional shooting for fun. I have been looking at some bows online but not exactly sure what I should be looking for. So far, I have found three samicks to choose from in my price range that I like the looks of, but not sure what technical stuff to be looking at. I am a true 28" draw as measured in the archery shop on a custom recurve. He recommended that I start @ roughly 45lbs, with a 60" minimum lenght bow, so that is what I have been looking at. I would like a bow that I can take down, and change limbs later if desired.
Pretty typical recommendation for a hunting oriented shop. Most such shops will recommend your first recurve at a legal hunting weight. That may or may not be the right thing for you.

If you are coming from compound you may be tempted to get a hunting weight bow based on your peak draw weight. Instead you should consider what your holding weight is. The strength that you develop through the use of your compound is range specific. You may be able to pull the cam of your compound over easily but that doesn't mean that you can hold a heavy weight at full draw easily. Depending on what kind of exercise you do your strength curve may roughly follow the draw force curve of your compound. So, a much lighter recurve may be what you need to start out with. But, everybody is different. So, you should see if there is a shop or a range where you can try out some bows at full draw with good form and see if you can comfortably hold the bow back for 5 or ten seconds without shaking. If not, you should probably choose a lighter bow, even if you think you can work up to the heavier one. And it won't hurt to get a bow that is much lighter than you can theoretically handle, so that you won't get tired practicing with it, which is one reason why so many people often recommend bows under 30#, not because you can't pull a heavier bow, but because it is better to practice with a bow that doesn't strain you at all as you are learning too shoot recurve with fingers. YMMV.

With the let off and mechanical advantages, compound is more about aiming than form, though both are important. Recurve is more about form than aiming. And if you are working on strength at the same time you are working on your nascent form you will learn more slowly and possibly even badly--developing bad habits such as short drawing and a hurried shot sequence that will be hard too undo. And you may get frustrated or injured and give up prematurely. Also, a heavy bow masks poor form such as a sloppy loose, so better to learn on a lighter bow and develop good form first.

Howard Hill, and many others, have said that starting out overbowed is the number one problem for archers. This, I think, is especially true of hunters since they want their first trad bow to be a hunting weight bow. You wouldn't buy a set of barbells in just the weight you hope to bench, that is you wouldn't buy just a 300 pound barbell because that is what you hope to bench. You'd just get hurt using it. Nobody would be that silly. But plenty of people think that they should buy a bow that is too heavy to draw to start, hoping to work they way into it. Penny smart, pound foolish in most cases.

Just as most people like to think they have an above average sense of humor, most people think they can shoot a heavier bow than they really should. So, try out some bows for yourself. The bow that will be right for you will be specific to you, not an arbitrary number, but it will probably less than you may think.


- Can any string material be shot from any bow?
Most new bows, yes. They can take the stiffer strings that are more efficient but give the bow limbs a harder, sharper stop. Vintage bows? Not so much.
- Can all bows have an elevated rest? or shot from shelf?
Mostly. Most trad hunters seem to prefer the simplicity and reliability of shooting off the shelf. Nothing to break. Many also like simple rests like the springy rest.
 

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Like anything new, the answers you get to your questions will seem like greek at first. You might want to spend some time on all of the traditional sites to pick up as much information as possible. As far as your first bow, there are a lot of nice sticks out there for a fraction of what a new bow will cost. If your experience is only with the compound you want to drop down in weight at least 25%. A recurve will provide an easier transition from a compound then a longbow only because of the grip and the weight. Once again, knowledge here will help the most with your pick. One warning, traditional archery is an addiction you will find yourself wanting to shoot more, learn more and above everything else you will have more fun doing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies all, I see alot of good input coming in and I will consider it all. First and formost this bow is going to be for fun, enjoyment, maybe a little video screen shooting and after tons of practice, maybe then hunting. I know it is not the same as a compound, but I shoot my compound at 68 lbs. I may buy an extra set of limbs as I get more profiecent.
Since I don't plan on buying for maybe a month or so, I will head back to the shop and shoot a few and see how fast muscle fatique sets in. Thanks again for the input.
 

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i had a deerslayer which is pretty much an older version of the deer master. shoots well off the shelf and tunes easily.
 

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First and formost this bow is going to be for fun, enjoyment, maybe a little video screen shooting and after tons of practice, maybe then hunting.
Than there is no real need to meet a certain draw weight requirement as of now.

I know it is not the same as a compound, but I shoot my compound at 68 lbs.
Generally speaking...most experienced compound arches can handle 60 - 70% of their compound bow's peak draw weight in a trad bow.

I may buy an extra set of limbs as I get more profiecent.
Great idea.

Since I don't plan on buying for maybe a month or so, I will head back to the shop and shoot a few and see how fast muscle fatique sets in. Thanks again for the input.
Another great idea. If you struggle with attaining or maintaining your form at a particular draw weight my suggestion would be to go lighter...until you can completely focus on form rather than focusing on drawing the bow or holding it at anchor.

Ray :shade:
 
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