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I won’t weight in on the void, but just another reminder to keep putting arrows/bullets in the animal until it stops moving, if you have the opportunity.
I’ve seen too many times people shoot, animal goes down or is flopping, they start celebrating.
My son missed on his first shot once and didn't take a follow up because he didn't want to get known as always shooting twice.

I told him "double tap" was a cool hunting nickname and throw bullets until its down.
 

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My son missed on his first shot once and didn't take a follow up because he didn't want to get known as always shooting twice.

I told him "double tap" was a cool hunting nickname and throw bullets until its down.
Officer: Why did you shoot your husband ten times ma'am?
Wife of dead man: cause I couldn't find the bigger magazine!
 

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My son missed on his first shot once and didn't take a follow up because he didn't want to get known as always shooting twice.

I told him "double tap" was a cool hunting nickname and throw bullets until its down.
Haha unless he’s laying there not moving, keep sending them! And even when he stops moving, stay on him for a minute just to make sure!
 

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This is an illustration and not a photo, but it closely reveals the height of the spinal processes above the spine and well above the thorasic cavity where the lungs and heart are located. As noted in several posts, the inflated lungs of a living deer extend right to the top, so any shot below the spine is going to impact the lungs in some manner. So people examine a dead deer lying on its back for field dressing and get a false impression of the actual physiology. DQ aptly noted that the reaction of the buck is consistent with arrow impact of a spinal process which can cause temporary paralysis......thus your buck flopping over. An immediate and accurate follow-up shot would have sealed the deal, but you already understand that now. I've done this once in 46 seasons and tracked the doe for close to a mile before losing the blood trail. A meat hit above the spine is muscle....no "void" or "no man's land" People have been shot in a war battle and lived, but there was not a "no man's land" for them to escape injury....just immediate death.
Jaw Organism Working animal Terrestrial animal Snout
 
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