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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading more and more lately on the many tunning methods for bows and arrows .
I've come across a few different articles, post and even publications of ( this is how i do it ) type tunning guides that mention the importance of the nock alignment and to ensure all your nocks are the same. I've yet to see an explanation of what you are referencing to aligned the nock with ??
Are they talking about your cock fletch or the most consistent spine line or what exactly ?????

I SHOT IT WITH MY P.S.E. HAMMER!
 

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They could be talking about nock tuning. Which is just rotating your nocks so a different vane becomes the cock fletch. If you number your arrows you may notice that there may be a couple out of a dozen that don't fly with the rest of the arrows. So what you do is rotate your nock 120 degrees and shoot to see if it hits where you are aiming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They could be talking about nock tuning. Which is just rotating your nocks so a different vane becomes the cock fletch. If you number your arrows you may notice that there may be a couple out of a dozen that don't fly with the rest of the arrows. So what you do is rotate your nock 120 degrees and shoot to see if it hits where you are aiming.
I have heard of that (I thought the moves we're smaller increments ) but I don't think that's what they are talk in about. They say the nocks must be exact and perfectly aligned ??? Aligned exactly and perfectly with what ??? "My question"

I think reindexing with a diff. fletch or smaller increments would be a trial and error way to find the laminated spine line for better consistency of arrow flight , which I do not disagree with , however; I just don't think that is what they are talking about??? Any other ideas out there?

I SHOT IT WITH MY P.S.E. HAMMER!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Maybe they are talking about : while bare shaft tunning arrows (on an already tuned bow) to make small incremental adjustments to the nock location to obtain the best performance out of the arrow... marking the nock location then fletch your arrows accordingly with the cock fletch aligned with the predetermined nock location ???

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either when bare shaft tuning or nock tuning your fletched arrows, what you are doing, is indexing the backbone of the arrow's spine to a consistent orientation, so that the shafts all dynamically flex the same direction when shot out of your bow. the more consistent that dynamic reaction is, the better they will group.
on a lighter note.... "nock location"......the nock usually always goes on the end opposite the point!
 

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Normally, when folks talk about alignment with arrow components they are talking about them being square. Whether it is the tip/insert or nock/unibushing system, it is important for them to be square. Any wobble at the nock end can show up as poor flight consistancy.
 

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Nock tuning is probably what they are talking about. I start by using a spine tester and placing the stiff side up. Then I use a hooter shooter to get bare shafts to hit the same hole before I fletch them. A 90deg turn in a nock will move poi around quite a bit. Without a hs, just shoot through paper and turn nocks until identical tears for each arrow.
The other thing they may be talking about is squaring the ends of the carbon that the nock seats against. When I put a pin bushing in an arrow, I check the runout of the pin. I can usually get it to .001, but will accept .002. To do this the face of the bushing and the face of the carbon must be square.
 

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The process of nock tuning can be simple or elaborate. It is simply aligning the dynamic spline (stiffest side of the arrow) on all of your arrows.

Many on AT object to the word "spline" (with an L). It is frequently misused. Arrow stiffness or deflection on a spine tester, is it's spine (without an L). The side of the arrow with the least deflection is the spline.

Spine testers, paper and hooter shooters can hasten the process, but you are not finished until you nock tune by actually shooting the arrows. The better tuned your bow, the more accurate the results from nock tuning.

Nock tuning by actual shooting is pretty simple. Number your arrows, set up a paper plate on your target, go back to the maximum distance that you can normally keep the arrows on a paper plate sized target, then work on your form. Keep track of arrows that don't play well with the others. Ignore arrows that were your fault.

When you find an arrow that doesn't group, it will almost always hit in the same relative position to the group. Twist the noch by 1/3 and see what difference that makes. If it's still out but in a different relative position to the group, twist it again.

Sometimes rotating the nock doesn't bring the arrow into the group, just shifts it's point of impact in relation to the group. This usually means an arrow that's damaged or defective. Consider it a cull. Throw it away or keep it for blank bale shooting or a tomato stake.

If you are shooting well, you can also do a little micro tuning to shrink your groups a little. The Easton guide has a pretty good description of this.

Most archers really don't have to do this. Just line up your cock vane on the arrow lable and you will get at least 2/3 the value of the testing above. Just number your arrows and keep track of the flyers. Of course, there is no reason not to try the rigorous nock tuning, but as with all tuning, you can tune only as good as you can shoot.

Hope this helps.
Allen
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wow thanks to everyone ! I understand for sure now , funny though about how people do misuse the word spine ..I think it's sometimes because typing on a device that has predictive text ON it will enter spline as opposed to spine LOL this has actually happened to me on a post a while back and I got 4 EA responses systematically explaining what arrow spine was !
I will be nock tunning my arrows soon. Now I have a good reason to make me a spli oops a spine tester ( 1.94lbs center of 28" supported shaft section right ??)

I SHOT IT WITH MY P.S.E. HAMMER!
 

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Nock tuning is probably what they are talking about. I start by using a spine tester and placing the stiff side up. Then I use a hooter shooter to get bare shafts to hit the same hole before I fletch them. A 90deg turn in a nock will move poi around quite a bit. Without a hs, just shoot through paper and turn nocks until identical tears for each arrow.
The other thing they may be talking about is squaring the ends of the carbon that the nock seats against. When I put a pin bushing in an arrow, I check the runout of the pin. I can usually get it to .001, but will accept .002. To do this the face of the bushing and the face of the carbon must be square.
Winer. Winer chicken dinner lol this is really the right way to tune arrows for best result
 

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If you want a quick & easy spine tester, go to Sam Harpers website:

http://poorfolkbows.com/spine3.htm

Scroll down to the "Thin Man" design.

I replaced the nail and carpenters square with a dial indicator. No better, just more precise.

Allen
 
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