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Sponge 4 bowhunting info
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I know adding weight to the bed of a truck when it's pouring rain will help prevent hydroplaning but what about offroad in AZ mud? Is weight your friend their too or does it hinder performance? I just added several hundred pounds to my bed (sandsnakes filled with gravel) which helped alot on the road in the wet...but I'm still learning about offroad stuff. Generally I just accellerate through big mud puddles and sometimes barely make it across. Thinking more weight might bog me down there. But I can also see the opposite being true if you can bite into solid ground. Man that red AZ mud just eats paint.
 

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Can't help with AZ mud advice but I always prefer some weight in my truck bed during hunting season, it smooths the ride on logging roads and better traction on some sketchy side roads I may get into. You have 4 wheel drive? Weight in bed of truck is always a benefit in my opinion. If the AZ mud is like the Wyoming gumbo stuff I have heard and read about it may not make much difference because the tires will be clogged after about 2 revolutions.
 

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Not sure about 2 wheel drive trucks, but 4 wheel drives you want lightweight in mud. Up here in mn an wi I run super swampers on my hunting truck, or sometimes just a BF Goodrich MT. You want a lightweight truck with an aggressive wide tire to help float over mud as much as possible. I also 4 wheel for fun so I have tried just about everything you can think of for better traction in mud. For winter you want just the opposite, a tall skinny tire with extra weight in the bed of your truck.
 

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I would put as much weight in the bed that you have power for. It will absolutely improve rear traction. A good after market limited slip, like a Detroit true trac, or even better, a selectable locker will make a 2WD truck wheel as good as an open differential 4WD rig. That will be much cheaper than buying a four wheel drive pickup or SUV. Good mud tires help too.
 

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mule deer!
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I was in the Payson area just as El Nino was kicking off and using a Jeep Rubicon. I was slippin and slidin everywhere! Slid off the road going around 5mph and had to use the diff locker when 4-lo wasn't cutting it. I definitely would NOT have made it out of there in a 2x w/ nice tires. I could have been DOOMED in some spots if I wasn't as careful as I was. IDK if this helps any.
 

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I have had 2x trucks in the past and decided I wouldn't have another. A front wheel in a shallow ditch of 6" depth and it can be hard to get out. Lockers would be the best-air lockers for selectable and Detroit for automatic with weight in bed, 300-400lbs. LS I don't think would be much benefit unless you have 4x4. Tires are an old argument, I remember my uncle's discussing narrow hard Tires vs wide soft Tires back in the 1970's and explaining why their choice was better. I just use mud terrain Tires like Cooper discoverer STT with good results. Ideally if you have 2x truck just stay on better roads.
 

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Not sure about 2 wheel drive trucks, but 4 wheel drives you want lightweight in mud. Up here in mn an wi I run super swampers on my hunting truck, or sometimes just a BF Goodrich MT. You want a lightweight truck with an aggressive wide tire to help float over mud as much as possible. I also 4 wheel for fun so I have tried just about everything you can think of for better traction in mud. For winter you want just the opposite, a tall skinny tire with extra weight in the bed of your truck.
What he said but not sure about with a 2wd.
 

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WY has crazy mud as well, had never experienced anything like it. I took the locals advice and put chains on my tires. Worked like a charm. I do have 4x4 though. Not sure it is the same kind of mud. Apparently the local mines use this mud as a lubricant and I found out why. You slide even while stopped.
 

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WY has crazy mud as well, had never experienced anything like it. I took the locals advice and put chains on my tires. Worked like a charm. I do have 4x4 though. Not sure it is the same kind of mud. Apparently the local mines use this mud as a lubricant and I found out why. You slide even while stopped.
As much as I hate chaining up, I will do it in the mud. Gives you a huge edge. Learn how to put the chains on before you need them.
I use heavy duty tie wraps to secure the chain keepers/latches, after losing a chain in the mud.
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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Yeah, Seems to me the lighter trucks I've owned- like my Tundra- have been better 4 wheelers than my heavier 3/4 ton diesels.

When the mud gets that bad I usually resort to my Quad....sorry, no good 4wd tips here. The Anti lock braking systems in the new trucks have given me fits when sliding down hills in the mud- they don't let you skid steer just freewheel...so quad is my solution.
 

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Not sure about mud but in sand we would lower the air pressure to about 12-15#. It makes the foot print a bit longer a grabs a little more. Seems like it should work in mud too.
 

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What kind of mud we talking about here?
If its the kind that is only a couple inches deep but sticks to everything. The tires that clean themselves are going to be key.

If its mud that is two feet deep. Then momentum is the key.
 

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Those last two opinions are diametrically opposed. I run 8" wide Toyo AT Xtremes. Some of the mud holes are holding several inches of water.
I realized that we contradicted each other after my post. I think in deep, watery mud, floatation is key. In AZ, I assumed it's slick, snotty mud, where I would weigh down the back of a pickup. I've had 4 jeeps and two trucks that I've hunted in for the last 30 years. While they've all had 4wd, the ones with good after market traction devices did the best. Grand Cherokee and Toyota pickup with open diffs were the worse. Old beater Cherokee XJ with a front locker did the best. I typically hunt pigs in the winter in the coastal mountains of Mendocino and Sonoma. This past weekend, it pi$$ed rain on us for 48 hours straight, and the roads were like vaseline. Even my buddy's Polaris Ranger was sliding in 4wd, but did better when two of us jumped in the back. Came home with a chest cold and sinus infection. :-( Still worth it though.
 

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Sponge 4 bowhunting info
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Discussion Starter #16
My buddy drove one season when my truck broke down on the way out. His Ford 250 Superduty w/ liftgate nearly got stuck several times and came home with a big dent in the door from sliding into a rock. It's slick stuff!
 

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What kind of mud we talking about here?
If its the kind that is only a couple inches deep but sticks to everything. The tires that clean themselves are going to be key.

If its mud that is two feet deep. Then momentum is the key.

this right here....

i have played in the mud since i was a little kid on a farm and in the mountains around southern oregon and northern california. several inches of mud in a puddle is kids play here. we have a lot of areas were you could swallow stock height vehicles in shallow looking water crossings.

momentum is your friend in all aspects of mud and water crossings, but not fast, once you loose your momentum your screwed. 4x4s are king for playing in the mud no question about it. to make a 2wd vehicle okay in the mud takes money. locker in the rear (selectable preferred), good aggressive mud tires (wider is better for mud), and in the end a good winch on the front or hitch mount that has all the tools to get you out of the situation (desert tools or tree straps).

the cheapest route would be the winch. you can setup a winch to remote hitch mount front and rear for around 500 bucks. the selectable locker route is in the $1500 range ($1000 for arb byself before compressor and other odds and ends) unless you buy used parts. then there are tires and you can break the bank getting different tire combos.

i had a rock crawler setup for all these types of shenanigans and found myself with a light wallet and not a very road friendly rig in the end when i finally sold it for far less then i put into it. if you have the funds laying around i would get a little 4X4 toyota tacoma, put some mud terrain tires on it, have a remote mount winch and call it a day.
 

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My buddy drove one season when my truck broke down on the way out. His Ford 250 Superduty w/ liftgate nearly got stuck several times and came home with a big dent in the door from sliding into a rock. It's slick stuff!
I can relate. I try to avoid really bad roads with my Dodge Ram 2500. At 7,000 lbs., it would be really hard to make unstuck. Shovel and a come-along wouldn't cut it. I got it stuck in Lake County one winter in a very steep ditch and had to wait until the next day when a 4wd 2-ton wrecker could pull me out. Never again. Expensive too. :(
 

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Sponge 4 bowhunting info
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Discussion Starter #19
Well so far I've been okay gunning through the mud so i guess I'll keep it up. During the rains we had here recently the flooding on the freeway was sketchy. Added 600lbs of gravel to the bed to prevent fishtailing at higher speeds.

600lbs2.jpg 600lbs.jpg
 

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I had a 2x truck that I put a 55gal drum in the bed on blocks of wood to keep from rolling around. Filled with water as needed. It did OK. If get truck inner tubes, cut them down and fill with sand then tie both ends closed. Should last longer than those bags or tubes and won't roll around in the bed.
 
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