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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All!

I've been a wheel bow hunter, but I want to get into traditional, and my girlfriend does too. I picked up an awesome little York Crescent, 64" recurve, 26# at 28". Put a new string on it. Lovely bow. The guy at the shop told me not to shoot it because it would be unsafe and might break because it is old. He said it was okay for her to shoot though, because her draw is short. I don't know whether that is right or not. It doesn't stack at my draw, and feels smooth, and nice. He said I should get my own bow (not an old one, aka, one from his shop).

I've got a 32" draw with my compound, but only a 29" draw with a recurve. She's got a 24" draw with a recurve.

At the shop, we found the bow draws to 30# at my draw, and 22# at hers.

What do you all think? Is it likely that I'm going to break this bow by drawing it to 29#? (Also, I've got an old bear from 1961, 40#@28", 66" long, that I love, but I want to get my form right at a lower draw, as the bear is closer to 45# at my draw).

Thanks for any and all advice!
 

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Without looking at that specific bow I can say the design will be fine so long as there aren't any flaws.

As for draw length, you shouldn't be losing any going from compound to recurve unless you have major form issues with the compound. If anything you should gain a little. That advice comes from coaching a few competitive compound shooters into reasonably competitive barebow shooters. None have lost dl.

Grant
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you grant! The bow has no obvious flaws (tight tips, no delamination, etc). As for DL, I've just found comfort w a different anchoring point for recurve.

Others, thoughts on safety/longevity w an older 64" bow drawing back to 29" or 30"? Love to hear opinions.
 

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I have a 32 inch plus recurve draw and about 31 with a compound shooting fingers. It is hard to fully expand and come to proper alignment with a recurve, which is not as big of a problem with a compound. I would expect you to pick up some serious draw length as your form develops, unless perhaps, you are overdrawing the compound.

As far as old bows are concerned, be cautious. I had one explode into three sharp shards, two almost hitting me in the eyes. I test suspect bows on a draw board first. My experience is that lighter bows are not as big of a problem due to their greater flexibility. I shot an old 60 inch Bear Cub longbow that is somewhere around 20 pounds, with no problem at all. It is very flexible.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Hank! How do you test them? I've been drawing it back to 24", checking it out, then occasionally to 29 or 30". It is smooth. No funky noises, no hard stacking, no irregularities or flaws showing up in the limbs, etc.., it just draws like it should. Anything else you look for?
 

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The bow, with the poundage being given at a draw length of 26", is often indicative of the intended user's profile (beginner/youth and/or something in that neighborhood). That said, I would tend to side somewhat with the advice given from "the guy" at the shop.

On the other hand, 64" should normally accommodate a longer draw length...and especially as that bow is most likely fiberglass laminated. Myself, I would not typically have much reservation shooting the bow even with my longer draw length...but I am a very large advocate for doing as I say and not as I do. I have a lot of vintage bows...but I have also learned to be critical of every aspect of bow behavior...especially very minute sounds.

No bow offers an infinite number of shots...whether it's the first shot, or you put all the zero's you want after the one, all bows are on an unpredictable road to breaking. The reality is that this is a shooting sport...and one should never overlook or become apathetic to genuine concerns. Good Luck with your decisions (and your new bow)...and Enjoy, Rick.
 
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