Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi!

I got an old PSE compound bow from my uncle, but as is usual with old equipment, some things were missing. I'm looking for a manual, year of manufacture, model number or anything that will help me get more information about this bow. Specifically I'd like to decrease the draw weight from 60lb to 50lb, as I'm not yet quite strong enough to comfortably use it at 60lb. Someone was worried about the lack of a cable guard, but it looks to me like this is a bow with a single string instead of separate string and cables, which might be why there's no cable guard.

old-pse-bow.jpg
The bow

specs.jpg
Is 'Pacer' the Model?

old-pse-sight.jpg
Sight

old-pse-top-cam.jpg
Top cam

old-pse-bottom-cam.jpg
Bottom cam

Any help will be appreciated.

Cheers,
Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,381 Posts
WOW I cant help you much but that's a cool bow to have, I would hang onto it if I was you. Its amazing the changes since then isn't it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,060 Posts
You can back out the limb bolts to reduce weight just be sure not to back em out so far that the pockets cant hold them in place. keep at least part of the limb recessed in the pocket.

The bow has a string and cables. The cables are steel with plastic covering and have the "teardrops" on the ends that the string loops onto. I would think there would be a cable guard as well unless the cams are wide enough to separate the strings from the cables to give vane clearance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
The Pacer didn't come with a cable guard. We used to get the universal fit guards made by Cobra.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
You can back out the limb bolts to reduce weight just be sure not to back em out so far that the pockets cant hold them in place. keep at least part of the limb recessed in the pocket.
Ideally I'd like to have some manual information or the like about how far it is safe to back them out. But thanks for confirming the general idea.

The bow has a string and cables. The cables are steel with plastic covering and have the "teardrops" on the ends that the string loops onto. I would think there would be a cable guard as well unless the cams are wide enough to separate the strings from the cables to give vane clearance.
Oh, I see what you mean. I just same some designs where the string only seemed to be connected to the cams and not to the cables. Here are pictures about the cams from a different angle and the clearance they provide:

cam.jpg

IMG_20170511_101316.jpg

Cheers,
Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,036 Posts
That bow really didn't need a cable guard as long as you shot it with the odd colored fletch out. Away from the riser. Not really enough clearance to shoot any other type of arrow rest with that bow anyway.
Also with tear drop cables, use a Dacron string only, also I would shoot aluminum arrows only. If you have to shoot carbons, make sure they weigh at least 450 - 500 grains to be safe.
The weakest link on that bow is the tear drop cables which have been about impossible to find. The plastic wheel isn't all that strong either, so stay with heavy arrows if you plan on shooting it.
There's really no way of knowing how long the cables will last. They could last another 35 years or could break on your first shot.
Just finding them to replace is getting very expensive when just 3 years ago they sold for about $8.00 a pair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,025 Posts
Sold and tuned a lot of PSE Pacers when I worked at an archery shop in the 70s and 80s. The wide plastic cam eliminates the need for a cable guard. From the pictures I see, the cables seem to be in good shape, but check for any flaws.
The string has stretches or is too long by at least 1" to 2" and the cam is over-rotated. Back both limb bolts counter-clockwise evenly until 50# is reached. The cables have double-teardrops, so a press is not needed to change string. Simply pull bow a couple of inches and hold it while a friend puts the new string on the empty teardrops. Since the new string will be shorted, the original string will be loose when you relax the bow bow back down making it easy to remove original string.

With the string too long, the bow will be about 65# and when shot , it will have quit a kick. With a shorter string, the bow might feel OK at 60# and the shot will be far smoother.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top