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You have a slight rearward lean, which has absolutely nothing to do with your draw length. When you draw, you need to remember to push your bow arm forward into position. Draw should be a push to position THEN pull the remaining draw to anchor.

Regarding your draw length, because everyone will make a comment on it, in order to double check your alignment, we need to see another photo from behind / above. Your shooting structure is a 3 dimensional organisation of bones, and without 2 photos, we simply cannot see all 3 dimensions.

So in order to go further, i ask two questions:
- How is your bow side elbow oriented? Is it horizontal or vertical.
- Is there any pattern to your mistakes? When a shot goes bad, does it have a tendancy to go, say, low and right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You have a slight rearward lean, which has absolutely nothing to do with your draw length. When you draw, you need to remember to push your bow arm forward into position. Draw should be a push to position THEN pull the remaining draw to anchor.

Regarding your draw length, because everyone will make a comment on it, in order to double check your alignment, we need to see another photo from behind / above. Your shooting structure is a 3 dimensional organisation of bones, and without 2 photos, we simply cannot see all 3 dimensions.

So in order to go further, i ask two questions:
- How is your bow side elbow oriented? Is it horizontal or vertical.
- Is there any pattern to your mistakes? When a shot goes bad, does it have a tendancy to go, say, low and right?
Is this what your looking for?
 

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Perfect!

Ok, i reckon your draw is very bloody close. For me, the most glaring fault, now that i can see your arm without a jumper on (you call them sweaters i think?), is that your elbow alignment is not good. It will seem like a total uphill struggle (guys always find it harder than women for some reason), but you need to work on getting that elbow around until its much more vertical.

Go to the gym and do some tricep pulldowns. Focus on high reps, even up into the 30's, not high weights. Slow reps are even better. While youre there, do some chickenwing lifts to work on the deltoids, because they are supposed to take the mass of the bow, and at the moment, they are not. Once you start trying to get your elbow around, youll notice its hard to hold it there (your triceps brachii are not strong enough for long enough) and youll find the bow feels a lot heavier. When youre starting out with getting it around, ditch the stabilisers. Mass weight makes the job harder.

Once you confidently have your elbow around, you need to work on asserting your front arm forward in order to get your core straight. Push, then complete the draw. Bring the string to your head, dont run away from it. You may even want to drop the poundage (for practice / training purposes) so that you can work on getting your body and arms correct relative to each other. This should naturally correct the other fault i see - your shoulder alignment is steering a little bit away from the target.

Get a friend, holding one of your arrows to stand behind you. Once youre at full draw, get the friend to rest the arrow across your shoulder blades. Ask them where the arrow is pointing. It should, in an ideal world, be pointing at the target or, even better, your bow wrist. This would mean that your bones are taking the load, not your muscles. The process of fixing this is the same as above - you need to assert the draw in the right way. Make sure your core is upright and relaxed, and that you feel like you are steering the arrow with a line drawn along the back of your shoulderblades. It might make your draw feel slightly short when you get it right, and i think it might be, but it wont be much. Maybe let out 3 or 4 twists of the string once you get settled with the right technique.

And good luck with it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Perfect!

Ok, i reckon your draw is very bloody close. For me, the most glaring fault, now that i can see your arm without a jumper on (you call them sweaters i think?), is that your elbow alignment is not good. It will seem like a total uphill struggle (guys always find it harder than women for some reason), but you need to work on getting that elbow around until its much more vertical.

Go to the gym and do some tricep pulldowns. Focus on high reps, even up into the 30's, not high weights. Slow reps are even better. While youre there, do some chickenwing lifts to work on the deltoids, because they are supposed to take the mass of the bow, and at the moment, they are not. Once you start trying to get your elbow around, youll notice its hard to hold it there (your triceps brachii are not strong enough for long enough) and youll find the bow feels a lot heavier. When youre starting out with getting it around, ditch the stabilisers. Mass weight makes the job harder.

Once you confidently have your elbow around, you need to work on asserting your front arm forward in order to get your core straight. Push, then complete the draw. Bring the string to your head, dont run away from it. You may even want to drop the poundage (for practice / training purposes) so that you can work on getting your body and arms correct relative to each other. This should naturally correct the other fault i see - your shoulder alignment is steering a little bit away from the target.

Get a friend, holding one of your arrows to stand behind you. Once youre at full draw, get the friend to rest the arrow across your shoulder blades. Ask them where the arrow is pointing. It should, in an ideal world, be pointing at the target or, even better, your bow wrist. This would mean that your bones are taking the load, not your muscles. The process of fixing this is the same as above - you need to assert the draw in the right way. Make sure your core is upright and relaxed, and that you feel like you are steering the arrow with a line drawn along the back of your shoulderblades. It might make your draw feel slightly short when you get it right, and i think it might be, but it wont be much. Maybe let out 3 or 4 twists of the string once you get settled with the right technique.

And good luck with it!
ok thanks for the info! I'll work on what you have said then probably send you some pictures later to see if I made any improvements.

Elliott
 

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Rytera Nemesis, Easton Pro Hunters, Muzzy 3 blade, tru-Ball hinge release.
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Looks good

Perfect!

Ok, i reckon your draw is very bloody close. For me, the most glaring fault, now that i can see your arm without a jumper on (you call them sweaters i think?), is that your elbow alignment is not good. It will seem like a total uphill struggle (guys always find it harder than women for some reason), but you need to work on getting that elbow around until its much more vertical.

Go to the gym and do some tricep pulldowns. Focus on high reps, even up into the 30's, not high weights. Slow reps are even better. While youre there, do some chickenwing lifts to work on the deltoids, because they are supposed to take the mass of the bow, and at the moment, they are not. Once you start trying to get your elbow around, youll notice its hard to hold it there (your triceps brachii are not strong enough for long enough) and youll find the bow feels a lot heavier. When youre starting out with getting it around, ditch the stabilisers. Mass weight makes the job harder.

Once you confidently have your elbow around, you need to work on asserting your front arm forward in order to get your core straight. Push, then complete the draw. Bring the string to your head, dont run away from it. You may even want to drop the poundage (for practice / training purposes) so that you can work on getting your body and arms correct relative to each other. This should naturally correct the other fault i see - your shoulder alignment is steering a little bit away from the target.

Get a friend, holding one of your arrows to stand behind you. Once youre at full draw, get the friend to rest the arrow across your shoulder blades. Ask them where the arrow is pointing. It should, in an ideal world, be pointing at the target or, even better, your bow wrist. This would mean that your bones are taking the load, not your muscles. The process of fixing this is the same as above - you need to assert the draw in the right way. Make sure your core is upright and relaxed, and that you feel like you are steering the arrow with a line drawn along the back of your shoulderblades. It might make your draw feel slightly short when you get it right, and i think it might be, but it wont be much. Maybe let out 3 or 4 twists of the string once you get settled with the right technique.

And good luck with it!
I have a student who anchors where you do and it looks very much the same, your good to go , things may appear to be slightly different then some guys but its because of your choice for anchor. Keep trucking:shade:
 
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