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Discussion Starter #1
I am a wannabe Big Game Hunter who's getting my equipment together and trying to learn as much as I can. I am looking at getting a hunting backpack so I can hike all my gear, shoot at my game animal and kill it and then pack it out back to my vehicle.
My silly newbie question is, after you quarter and cut all the meat away and place it in your game bags, see you then just put the whole bag full of meat inside of your backpack with your sleeping bag and tent and clothing and everything else?
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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I am a wannabe Big Game Hunter who's getting my equipment together and trying to learn as much as I can. I am looking at getting a hunting backpack so I can hike all my gear, shoot at my game animal and kill it and then pack it out back to my vehicle.
My silly newbie question is, after you quarter and cut all the meat away and place it in your game bags, see you then just put the whole bag full of meat inside of your backpack with your sleeping bag and tent and clothing and everything else?
Only if you kill a yearling Coues deer! JK... ;)
You'll most likely be making several trips with meat and then worry about camping gear.
A lot of guys use a plastic garbage bag to line the inside of their pack... to keep the blood off. If you do that, you DO NOT want to put fresh meat that's still warm in plastic! It'll go south in a hurry. Some packs are made to haul meat on the outside of the pack. Which let's some air get to it, at least.
 

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Shootingairborne
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Elk has a lot of meat. When we went it was four of us. All of our packs were ole school. The pack comes off of the frame. So you just use the frame and strap the meat to it and hump it out. You gotta come back for your gear.

Good luck.
 

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As above plan on multiple trips.

in addition you will want a cooler or coolers with some ice at your vehicle or at least know where ice is so you can get the meat on ice fast.

You want the meat clean and cooled quickly. The longer the meat (not air temp) sits above 40 degrees the higher the chance that bacteria can start multiplying.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I guess my main question is, how do you keep the inside of your pack clean and without getting blood everywhere?
 

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I guess my main question is, how do you keep the inside of your pack clean and without getting blood everywhere?
I haven't had to haul many out on my back, Horses or planes but when I have the first trip out was the gear I brought in and the rack, cape etc etc . After that it was meat hauling and I took the bag off the frame and strapped the bags of meat to it for the walk out. Always bone them out even with the horses as I don't want the weight , Only bring out quarters if it is a pretty short trip and it is someone else animal . Don't put meat inside your pack no blood worries and cooler meat.
 

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I guess my main question is, how do you keep the inside of your pack clean and without getting blood everywhere?
I either line my pack with a heavy duty trash bag, or put my gear in the trash bag to keep it clean and not worry about my pack getting bloody.

It's situational dependent for me, but the standard for this style hunting seems to be a contractor trash bag to line pack.

Sometime it's easier to deal with a bloody pack at home or a motel after the fact.
 

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Catty Shack
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You'll need something along the lines of a pack with a "freighter frame" for hauling the numerous trips you'll be making. I had a Camp Trails pack 20 years ago that I think was called the Outfitter pack or something like that.

It was a huge central pack with two long pouches along the sides. Actually my buddy and I had the same pack for our Colorado DIY hunt, and we used those to haul out my elk. The other 2 guys hauled the smaller game bags over their shoulder - they were whipped when we got back to our spike camp.

The pack was large enough that we sleeved two 5 gallon buckets in the bottom (on top of the lids) and filled them with food, clothing whatever and continued filling the pack the rest of the way. When we got the camp set up, the 4 of us each had a bucket to sit on around the campfire. WE kept our food in them and used one to haul water back from the river to filter into our drinking container. This worked out extremely well.
 

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Kill the animal. Locate it. Take photos. Move/adjust animal for optimal field dressing. Note time. Eat something. Take two Ibuprofen. Lay out the knife, game bag, water, plastic/tarp, rope, second knife, plastic gloves (two or three of them) and extra headlamp. Clear out a place for where you want to put the meat. Field dress and de-bone. Lay meat out on tarp/log/sticks/bag to cool. Move guts about 100yds away. Put meat in the game bags. hang some of them as high as you can. Line the pack with contractor-grade trash bag. Locate the meat that is most cooled. Load about 40lbs of meat in your bag. Go to your car. Unload into cooler. Go back to kill site. Load 40 more lbs. Go back to car. Do this until all your meat is done. Eat something. Go back to camp and get your stuff. Snack. Go home. Take two more Ibuprofen.

Easy peezey.
 

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Kill the animal. Locate it. Take photos. Move/adjust animal for optimal field dressing. Note time. Eat something. Take two Ibuprofen. Lay out the knife, game bag, water, plastic/tarp, rope, second knife, plastic gloves (two or three of them) and extra headlamp. Clear out a place for where you want to put the meat. Field dress and de-bone. Lay meat out on tarp/log/sticks/bag to cool. Move guts about 100yds away. Put meat in the game bags. hang some of them as high as you can. Line the pack with contractor-grade trash bag. Locate the meat that is most cooled. Load about 40lbs of meat in your bag. Go to your car. Unload into cooler. Go back to kill site. Load 40 more lbs. Go back to car. Do this until all your meat is done. Eat something. Go back to camp and get your stuff. Snack. Go home. Take two more Ibuprofen.

Easy peezey.
Easy Peezey. LOL. The REAL work can come after the kill.
 

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Kill the animal. Locate it. Take photos. Move/adjust animal for optimal field dressing. Note time. Eat something. Take two Ibuprofen. Lay out the knife, game bag, water, plastic/tarp, rope, second knife, plastic gloves (two or three of them) and extra headlamp. Clear out a place for where you want to put the meat. Field dress and de-bone. Lay meat out on tarp/log/sticks/bag to cool. Move guts about 100yds away. Put meat in the game bags. hang some of them as high as you can. Line the pack with contractor-grade trash bag. Locate the meat that is most cooled. Load about 40lbs of meat in your bag. Go to your car. Unload into cooler. Go back to kill site. Load 40 more lbs. Go back to car. Do this until all your meat is done. Eat something. Go back to camp and get your stuff. Snack. Go home. Take two more Ibuprofen.

Easy peezey.
Gotta ask why you would waste the time to gut if your processing in a way that your doing a pack out? I'm guessing you have a good reason?
 

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We use the gutless method on moose, we will put the quarters into game bags, and strap the quarters to the outside of our bags or put them inside the bag if the quarters are small enough. I have never worried about blood on the bag.
We will stagger out to the closest road with as much as we can carry in one trip. Farther from the road or rougher the terrain we carry less. Last two moose we packed out were less then a mile so my buddy and I each had 150lbs of moose in each bag. We have to help each stand up under our bags. For deer we are usually only wearing day packs and use heavy duty prospector bags made for rock samples. Usually one black tail in two bags deboned is easy for two
Guys to carry out in one trip and then in our day packs there is no blood on our packs. Especially important if we still plan on
Making our trip a couple more days. Blood on gear in bear country is bad news.
For moose we don't care as we will be headed home or to base camp to clean up before we head back out.
When I get home from my hunting trip I soak backpack in my wife's brand new soaker tub. I try to do that as soon as I get home and preferably when she's not home. I wash the tub good when I'm done and air dry my pack.
I use a mr nice 6500, and a badlands 2200, and an outbound 40 l pack for hunting.
 

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I like packs that have a load shelf, so the meat goes between the frame and the bag, a load shelf is a key feature for me.

The best bang for you buck, imo, is the horn hunter full curl system, best do all pack for under 500 bucks.

I just game bag meat and pack it, then clean the pack.

Soak the pack in water, pour a bunch of baking soda on it, rub it in really well, then rinse really well. I did that process several times this year, and my pack never got nasty.

Don't skimp on your pack, it is a super important aspect, it needs to function and haul a lot of weight comfortably. I lime my horn hunter quite a bit, handles weight awesome, last day I used it to haul meat, I took a front quarter and rear quarter from a Roosevelt bull our first trip out, just shy of 3 miles, I would have not tried that with my kuiu pack.

I'm going to upgrade to an EXO this year, just a little more refined pack.

Good luck!
 

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Gotta ask why you would waste the time to gut if your processing in a way that your doing a pack out? I'm guessing you have a good reason?
It seems like it's still 50/50 on people who gut, and people who go gutless. I switched to gutless a few years ago, but in that time, have still gutted 2, both solo elk, and dead in a really bad spot, had to gut so I could manage them without having them slide way further down the ridge. Gutless I would not been able to get to the other side without possibly knocking it over the edge.

To me I would rather take the few minutes to gut than pack half an elk a couple hundred yards up a near vertical ridge.

Some also have the misconception that gutless is more wasteful, which it isn't.
 

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Dart368, there are LOTS of other things you will need to consider before tackling this adventure. Standing over a dead elk is no time to wonder what you need to complete the task.

Lots of essential items, knives, something to sharpen them with (or a havalon with a real knife for backup) it's also no place to learn your one knife will dull before you are done.

Headlamps are huge dealing with downed game at night. It only took one time processing a bull by myself in the dark with a flashlight in my mouth to realize how important it is to forget a headlamp.

Especially elk hunting, stay aware of how far you are from your rig or camp, it is hot often times during elk season, you need to hunt within your means, by that I mean killing it, processing and packing, getting the meat cooled in a timely fashion before it spoils.

It takes a lot of work to get an elk out of the woods, especially solo when it's 80 degrees. I have packed quite a few bulls out by myself, and even a mile from the rig, depending on terrain, it can take all day and then some.

I'm not trying to scare you away from it, quite the opposite, I just want to make sure you are prepared. I had no hunters in my family, or mentors, and I have always pretty much hunted solo.

It's far from impossible, and gets easier every time, but there is a learning curve, and it can all be figured out on the fly, as long as you keep it realistic.

It's all easy stuff, it's a straight up caveman activity, don't over think it, but try to gather as much basic knowledge as possible, the rest comes with days spent in the woods.

Hunting has to be the coolest form of recreation a person can participate in, you never quit learning, it never gets so easy it's boring, we can always challenge ourselves, and there is no better way.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you everyone for all of your input and suggestions. I just got what I think is a killer deal on a pretty much new Eberlestock J107 Pack.
I had my heart set on a almost new Slumberjack which does have the meat Shelf so you can put your game bags outside of your pack. I was looking at used packs because that is all I can afford. The guy with the Slumberjack decided not to sell it so I went with the j107 at half the cost of brand new.
I know I have a lot to learn and I'm thinking realistically not actually going for anything big game until maybe 2019. But I like to plan ahead and gather up everything I will need instead of waiting for the last minute.
 

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Wild animals will go to the gutpile and eat first before finding the meat
Why not just carry the meat away from the carcass? Minus a reason like Roosie's it's just a waste of time and then your left working around the mess it leaves behind.
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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...
I know I have a lot to learn and I'm thinking realistically not actually going for anything big game until maybe 2019. But I like to plan ahead and gather up everything I will need instead of waiting for the last minute.

Vallejo, eh? Thats close. PM me in the spring and I will take you carp shooting....

My advice- just do it...don't wait until 2019....those Mtn trails are too good not to experience
trail red.jpg

First, know shot locations
far side mark spot.jpg

Next, develop a shot sequence for hunting....and practice for hunting shots [hint; its much different than target shooting]
cropped recurve bear1.jpg

Lastly; get them on the ground....plenty of ways to pack them out
180lb sow at laguna 1983.jpg

Yeah, a compactor bag in your pack works too- grin
 
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