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Guys, gals,

I know some of you have written about having pain in the elbow or shoulder. Well, I just wanted to know what you did about it...other than laying off shooting for several weeks. I know there were some graphics on proper form and the hand, but I can't find them now. I was wondering if you could direct me to the correct area for them. I just added a 7"stabilizer to my bow and hope this will help my elbow. I'm new to archery and my bow is set to 72 pounds. It's a High Country SSR and I really like it. It's pretty fast and accurate for me. I just want to be able to hunt with it and bag a few deer...that's all I'm asking for. As of now, I'm pulling back and keeping my left hand open when I release the arrow...my elbow is locked. I also had a limb saver placed on my Muzzy Zero Effect arrow rest to take some of the shock out of the bow. Suposedly, the carbon risers are made to decrease vibration, but I guess you can't take all of the vibration out of the bow. I'll post a photo of my bow if anyone is interested.

Govtman
 

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You might want to back the weight down a bit until you get used to shooting and build up the archery muscles. Me personally I don't anything above 58lbs. There's just no need for it.
 

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I may do that if my elbow doesn't get better. Do you think it has something to do with the vibration though as in tennis? Or, do you think it's the pull-push thingy?
 

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If it is your bow elbow that hurts, than yes, vibration can cause that. There can be ways to tame the vibs. Make shure you are shooting at least a 360 grain arrow It would be better if it were around 400 or back down the poundage, It will have the same effect.

make shure it is tuned and timed, a tuned bow is always smoother and quieter.

Add all the rubber you can get, Doinker stabilizers, sims limb savers, sims enhancer 2000, cat wiskers, string leachs, you name it.


OR, get a new bow, one that is smoother to begin with :) :) ;)
 

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Try a Legacy

There is no shock. Smoothest bow you will ever shoot. My elbow has no soreness when I shot my all last year.
 

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I'm new to archery and my bow is set to 72 pounds.
I think that's your problem. It takes a loooong time for your body to get used to the stresses that are developed drawing through that much weight.

I'm assuming you don't want to back down because of the impending ruminant slaughter.

This might sound weird, but how about practicing with just one or two arrows?

You would be shooting a lot less arrows, which would ease the burden on your body. When I do this, it puts a whole new perspective on the shot - really forces you to make that one shot count. I have found that practice like that is often better than shooting a lot of arrows, because the quality of practice goes way up.

I wouldn't stop shooting. Sometimes that does more harm to your body.

Good luck!

Scott
 

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My RazorTec shoots as smoothly without the Sim’s stabilizer, limb savers, and leaches as it does with them. The only reason I even use them is sound dampening.

In fact, I often leave them off for practice. The stabilizer does add a bit of balance to the bow.

I can pull much more poundage than I do. But I shoot better and can control the bow better, shooting only what I can comfortably draw straight back, no pointing the bow up or down. For me this is 65-68 lbs.
 

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Make sure your bow sling isn't too long.....if the bow jumps out of your hand and falls a fair way it will jerk your elbow. Also, you say your elbow is locked; just try relaxing it a little so it is straight but not locked into place.
 

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as Shirley says you say your elbow is locked; just try relaxing it a little so it is straight but not locked into place.


and turn it down
 

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The SSR is a very light bow. Try adding some mass weight (heavier stabilizers) to make it a little heavier. A heavier bow absorbs vibration more.
Monty53
 

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I would sell a bow that vibrated so bad it hurt my arm to shoot it....:D But then if everyone knew it did who would buy it....
 

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I have had bouts of bow arm elbow tendonitis and other problems. The first case came when I started shooting alot-8 years ago-my Orthopaedist had been an Olympic team doctor and immediately noted that I was hypertextending the elbow. stopped that-the pain went away. when I switched to recurve in 97 or soI would get occasional soreness after shooting many arrows in a week, It never got bad til the start of this spring season. I had started shooting a Martin Aurora in the indoor season with 40-42 pound limbs. No problems. However, when I went outdoors and went up to shorter 44 pound limbs (holding about 47) the elbow really started hurting. Hard to say why-I went back to shooting my old SKY bows (same weight) and the elbow calmed down. The change from heavy aluminum (2114 with 125 grain point) to X10's probably didn't help either.

An expert in bow design told me that the sky was a "softer riser" and thought that might be the reason or the grip difference. I have started indoor training with the Aurora again and there is no problems so it might have been overtraining as well though I know that other stiff risers, such as the aerotech tend to cause it to ache a bit more
 

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That locked elbow and the high draw weight is, most likely, your problem. You can still have a straight elbow without completely locking it. When you lock it, you are making the cartilage take almost all of the stress. Try reducing your draw weight by ten pounds. Your bow is fast enough at 62lb to kill anything in North America. If the pain has become constant already whether you are shooting or not, start taking two Advil with every meal. Do this for a couple of weeks. Even if it stops hurting after a few days keep taking the Advil. Its a great anti-inflamitory. If all else fails, a cortizone shot may be required to get you through bow season.
 

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PAIN...ELBOW & ELSEWHERE

As ccwilder3 has already noted, LOCKING the elbow will cause the bow's vibration to be transfered INTO the elbow and the bow-shoulder. UNLOCK that elbow.

Also, as he noted, you are shooting much more pull weight than is really needed,..."How far do you want the arrow to drive into the dirt on the opposite side of the deer?"...
Years ago we all use to shoot very high poundage bows and anything under 70# was considered puny because we just couldn't get the speed that we wanted without shooting 80#, or at the minimum 70#. THAT WAS THEN THIS IS NOW!!!
With the improvements in cam design and bow technology all around,...that higher poundage is just NOT NEEDED. (Unless you are going hunting for a Mack Truck!!!)

Lastly, I also like the idea of practicing by shooting just one(1) or at the most two(2) arrows, (second arrow could be shot to correct something noted as being incorrect form on the first one...consequently leaving a positive/confident attitude). The "one arrow practice" is a great way to prepare for your hunts and to keep you sharp throughout the season. As has already been noted,...you will get only one shot at that trophy of a lifetime.

bowtinkerer :cool:
 

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I really wouldn't worry about the vibration deal. Your setup is most likely fairly shock free, unless your arrows are way under 350 or 360 grains. I agree 100% with everyone that's told you to back the weight off and unlock your arm. You don't have to actually bend your arm, just relax it enough so it isn't locked.

I don't care if you lift weights and can bench 300 pounds, your muscles have to get used to shooting a bow to start with. Those muscles just aren't isolated the same way in day to day activity. You might be strong enough to build up to 70 or so pounds, but back it down to 62-65 for a while and slowly work up if you want to. Good luck!

peashooter
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks

Thanks to all for the information. I just returned home and cranked the poundage down to 64 pounds and it feels a lot better. Although there is still some pain, it's not as bad as it was before - - I took Motrin for a week plus. Now it's 60 degrees here in southern Illinois and I'm ready for 1 Oct 03! I'll post a picture of my setup in the Bowhunting section later. Thanks again.
 

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i think...

the problem is the drawing of that high weight not the vibration. back it off and stop shooting for a week or so in order to heal.

Heck go down to 60 lbs. Thats all you need. 50 will do also.

good shooting
 

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I too made the mistake of buying too heavy of a modern bow after a long layoff from buying any new equipment.

A 55# High Performance bow today will shoot faster than my 12 y.o. 70# bow. Why do I need 70# any more?

After watching a video of a buddy shooting a complete pass through of an 8' grizzy shooting 400 grain total weight arrows with a 55# bow, I am now a believer. That arrow even broke a rib on the way out.

My next bow will be 60# max.
 
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