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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never paper tuned any of my bows before and now that I'm shooting further distances I'm looking into paper tuning. Does it really help that much? What's the easiest way to do it? I've never done it before so all advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
David
 

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Get a cardboard box big enough so you can cut out a 12"by12" hole out of the front of it. It does'nt have to be 12 by 12, but make it big enough so you have confidence of getting a arrow thru it. So, cut out a hole out of the front of the box and then cut the entire back off of the box. Then go to the store and get some wax paper. Wax paper is the best stuff to use when paper tuning because you will very easily see what the arrrow is doing as far as bullet holes or what kind of tear you are getting. The tears being it a right tear, or left tear, etc. show up very easily with wax paper. Then get a small card table or stack like 3 totes on top of each other or something, so that when you put your cardboard box with the wax paper over the 12 by 12 opening, it is about at shoulder level. Then find some more totes or a workbench in the garage to set your target on. Make sure your target is far enough back from the paper so your arrow can pass thru, if you have a 28" arrow, put your target like 30-35" away from your paper. Now stand at 6 feet away from the front of the paper and draw your bow and aim for the center of the paper that you have taped to the front of your cardboard box. With paper tuning it is very important to be very relaxed when shooting. Shoot with a relaxed grip and use good form and keep a good follow thru just like you would if you were shooting at long distance. After you have shot the arrow make sure that your arrow hits the target good. Don't have your arrow only hitting a couple inches of the target other wise on your next shot it could miss the target and go thru the wall or whatever is on the other side. Now your goal with paper tuning is to get a perfect bullet hole. You will see a hole with 3 perfect slits coming off of it, just like if you were looking at the arrow from behind. If you have a left tear, that is where your fletching is to the left of your point, if your right handed shooting a release, move your rest to the right. If you have a right tear, fletching to the right of the point, move your rest to left. If you have a low tear where the fletching is below your point move your rest down, high tear, move your rest up. Lets say you get a low left tear, or other combination, always adjust the vertical part of the tear first. And then shoot again to see what happens to the horizontal part. When moving your rest it only takes a 1/16" of movement to make a difference. After a adjustment of the rest shoot thru paper to what it did, keep adjusting till you achieve a perfect bullet hole. If you keep adjusting and the tear is not getting any better, first thing to check is your vanes to see if they have any contact marks on the tips or highest part of the vane, from contacting the rest. If you have contact with the rest the best option is to go to your dealer and see if he can speed up the drop of the rest or mess with the timing of your rest so you can get clearance. If you shoot with the cock vane straight up, that will give you the best clearance. You can also go to www.lawleroutdoors.com and go to the tuning section. They have a lot of good info also. After all that if you get a bullet hole, try and shoot thru paper during another day to verify that your form and everything is still good and your adjustments to the rest are right. Paper tuning will make sure that your arrow is leaving the bow in a straight line and should help a lot for when you put broadheads on the tips of your arrows. Sorry for all the detail, but just wanted to cover a lot of the basics of paper tuning for you. Good luck.
 

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Another important note is lets say you have shot a arrow thru paper and you have a bullet hole. It is also important to shoot all 12 of your arrows thru paper to see if they also are shooting bullet holes. If you shoot a different arrow thru paper and get a left tear or some other kind of tear, rotate your nock 120 degrees and shoot again. A lot of times if you keep doing that eventually one position will give you a bullet hole just like your first arrow. The reason you might have a left tear with the nock in one position and not the other is most likely a spine issue with the arrow. The spine is probably not the same or consistant around the entire shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay thanks for the help. I'll go give it a try this weekend and see how it goes

David
 

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Yes I think so. It helps me to see if the spins is correct. I have seen guys that can't get a bullet hole in paper, but can shoot 300 and 60 x's. are go the other way around too. Paper tuning is just the first step in tuning. Group tune and than walk back tuning.
 

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Good rundown on the process, Bonz. A lot of target archers - particularly those who shoot Hoyt bows - like to paper tune for a slightly high left tear, and then fine tune from there for accuracy. But for those of use mainly concerned with hunting, we are trying to get field points and fixed broadheads to shoot as close to the same spot as possible. The paper tuning is a good start to that process. But ultimately you are going to need to compare the impact of the two heads and fine tune you setup for the best broadhead flight.
 
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