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I just bought my first bow. Bear Encounter. I am brand new to archery so I don't really know how to do anything myself. The place i bought the bow from say they don't ever paper tune thier own bows. I am curious should I take it somewhere to have it paper tuned? What should I expect to pay to have it done? I live in Utah near Provo if region makes a difference. Also is it something I should have done?

Thanks for all the help in advance.
 

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'13 KTM 450 SX FE
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It is something you can do yourself. You want to set a paper that you can get square to and shoot your arrow thru it at about 2-3 yards. You will want the paper some what tight and needs to be away from your target so the arrow has a clean pass thru. Depending on how the hole is tearing you will need to adjust your rest accordingly. If you have a right tear, in most cases you will need to move your rest to the left. If you have a high tear then you would lower the rest. What I mean by a tear is you can see where the point goes thru the paper and where the fletchings / vanes go thru. What you want is a perfect bullet hole with the 3 fletchings and a perfect circle in the middle. It is essential that you do not torque the bow and that the release is clean. I have also run into arrows that are not perfectly balanced and they can also give you some irratic tears, point being you might want to use 2-3 arrows initially and possibly eliminate the 'flyer'.
 

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If you torque the bow grip while shooting everything Xmxer stated will be for not. Try using a wrist sling that attaches to your front stabilizer hole, and use it, letting the back part of the grip settle in your palm. With fingers open, as to not impart any torque on bow grip.
 

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Im still new to archery myself but ive come a long way since i started. What these fellas are explaining is simple once you get the hang of it. This is what i do that seems to be easiest for me.
Get you a box about two foot by two foot square and cut out the face on the biggest side.. I try to leave about an inch all the way around from the corners so that the box has enough strength to stay together and stand up straight. Then do the same on the other side of the box. I like to fill the bottom inch of the box with dirt so it has a little weight to keep the wind from moving it around.
I then take a roll of last years christmas paper or get a news paper and tape a sheet of paper over the opening. It should be fairly tight on the box.

Now i set my box up four feet or so infront of an arrow stop. The reason you want several feet between the two is so your arrow has passed completely through the paper before it hits your arrow stop. For an arrow stop i like to use a stack of cardboard atleast 12"-16" thick and i use clear packing tape to tape all the cardboard together. Ive used this arrow stop for hundreds of shots and its my prefered target... Its light weight (sort of anyways) and its free.

Back up say nine feet and shoot arrow through paper and into arrow stop. As stated above use more than one arrow and shoot several times. Id say shoot four or five times and see if all the tears are the same before you adjust anything.

If all of the tears are the same then its clear you are not getting a false tear due to a poor grip... When you hold the bow.. Do so very easy and try not to twist the bow handle one way or the other.

If your tear in paper shows the feathers are ripping above the tip then this is called 'nock high' and generally that the arrow is on the bowstring to high and needs to be lowered. If the nock end or tail end of the arrow is below the tip then the tail is to low on the bow string. (theres a whole lot of other issues that cause this... But for now focus on the basics and only move the tail end of the arrow up or down to correct this.)

Fix the up/down tears first and dont worry about the side/side just yet...

When you adjust something only adjust one thing at a time... This is possibly the most common issue with people new to archery... They seem to adjust more than one thing at a time... And it makes it hard to see if what adjustments they have made have done any good.. Also makes it hard to see what might have made something worse or better if they dont know what they did to make it worse or better.

Okay.. Play with up or down on the string till the tip and tail of arrow are close to the same heigth.

Now if you started off with a tear like this ( / ) and the feathers are on top then you got high and right tear. Aftet lowering the tail end on the string you might get a horizontal year like this one ( - ). so you got the tail high corrected and now got a sideways rip.. In this case a tail right/nock right rip.. Now to work on the sideways rip......

If you are using an adjustable arrow rest that will move side to side then pick a direction and adjust it slightly either way. Trust me when i say it wont take long before you see it get better or worse...and common sense says if its getting worse then the adjustments youre making are the wrong way.

When you get a tear that has the tip of the arrow and the tail of the arrow less than half an inch apart then my advise is to move back six or eight feet and do it again. It wont take long till you realize what adjustment does what to the arrow. Then youll have an eaiser time with it.

Some people dont paper tune... But its a good idea to in my opinion because its easy but if youre twisting the bow then paper tuning can get frustrating...

I realize and ill tell you in advance that there are a ton of things that will throw your arrow off. Ive been shooting a ton for over a year and i still twist the bow a little.

This is the start of trying to get your bow shooting good but its only scratching the surface.

WARNING!!! It is not a good idea to shoot a bow unless you know your arrows are stiff enough for your bow. Since you said youre new to this i need to explain SPINE

Spine is the softness or stiffness of an arrow. You should make sure your arrow is stiff enough for your bow because if its two weak it will flex alot more than it is supposed to and in an extreme case the arrow will snap in half and go through your hand durring the shot. A compound bow will go through a deer... Your poor hand will not stop an arrow very well.... And if youre out of town somewhere and this happens to you youre gonna be freaking out and hurt bad with only you to drive yourself to get help.

Its serously dangerous to attempt to shoot a weak or damaged arrow. This is a fun and very rewarding sport but i promise you dont want a hand full of arrow.

When you get a rip thats fairly small then shoot like that for a while and see if you want to get a rip thats perfect... Its hard for most people to get a perfect rip every time... When its pretty close to perfect then cut the feathers down off one of your arrows and shoot it around twenty feet and see if the arrow flew straight or landed somewhat sideways... Without feathers on an arrow it has no real way to line itself out...

When you get this all figured out its time for you to click on the link titled "the nuts and bolts of archery"

With all i just said the above sentence is the only one that means anything;-)
Cheers mate
 
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