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Discussion Starter #1
I’m trying to figure out if my pin float is fixable or normal and I just need to deal with it. I’ll start by saying I shoot a elite ritual 70# 28” with a axcel single pin carbon pro, I have a 10” beestinger pro hunter with 4oz on the end. Some days I hold rock steady and can’t hardly float off a 2” circle at 50 yards. Then other days my pin floats 6” either side of the dot. I’ll float 6” left and 6” right and same up and down. Is there something I can do to fix this? Would a back bar help me? I’ve shot with more weight, less weight, and no weight. Can’t notice a difference. Should I just do holding drills with a lot of weight to where when I back it off to less weight to shoot it’s easier to hold? Any help is appreciated.


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Hey first off I'm not an expert at all, but recently I've been using a much longer stabilizer like 28". I also added the quivalizer to my halon which a lot of people don't like, but it sticks out quite a ways and I've found that a longer stabilizer makes a big difference. I used to have a 12" and I can say there's no comparison. I don't know what your hunting situation is, but if you can handle a longer stabilizer then I recommend it.

P.S. In my opinion the quivalizer is awesome. It's quick to move from the quiver position to the stabilizer position when spot and stalking and I don't find that there's any greater effect from the wind than a regular stabilizer and quiver.

I’m trying to figure out if my pin float is fixable or normal and I just need to deal with it. I’ll start by saying I shoot a elite ritual 70# 28” with a axcel single pin carbon pro, I have a 10” beestinger pro hunter with 4oz on the end. Some days I hold rock steady and can’t hardly float off a 2” circle at 50 yards. Then other days my pin floats 6” either side of the dot. I’ll float 6” left and 6” right and same up and down. Is there something I can do to fix this? Would a back bar help me? I’ve shot with more weight, less weight, and no weight. Can’t notice a difference. Should I just do holding drills with a lot of weight to where when I back it off to less weight to shoot it’s easier to hold? Any help is appreciated.


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Smilin' Bob
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Do you shoot holding against the wall or from the middle of the valley? You might take out a few twists in the cable and hold more firmly onto the backend of the valley/ wall.

IMO, form is what holds the pin still and accessories as there to accentuate it.


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The best thing to help your float is STOP trying to control your float. 3 things that control float. Or I say the top 3.
1. Correct draw length.
2. Front shoulder out and down
3. Back shoulder down., Elbow above your ear.

Now with those keep a relaxed bow hand, soft elbow, extended but relaxxeeddd.pull into your wall and keep a steady eassssyyyy pull and the arrows gone. Let your pin float around the 10 ring at 20 yards but keep your eye on the X.
 

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Hunter of many things
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Do you shoot holding against the wall or from the middle of the valley? You might take out a few twists in the cable and hold more firmly onto the backend of the valley/ wall.

IMO, form is what holds the pin still and accessories as there to accentuate it.


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Agree. ^^^. OP its hard to say, but if it comes and goes then its not your equipment. Everyone has good days and bad even the best archers.


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Discussion Starter #7
The best thing to help your float is STOP trying to control your float. 3 things that control float. Or I say the top 3.
1. Correct draw length.
2. Front shoulder out and down
3. Back shoulder down., Elbow above your ear.

Now with those keep a relaxed bow hand, soft elbow, extended but relaxxeeddd.pull into your wall and keep a steady eassssyyyy pull and the arrows gone. Let your pin float around the 10 ring at 20 yards but keep your eye on the X.
I’m not fighting it. I draw and set up. I keep my eye on the dot and wait for my pin to settle on the dot. I’m a fairly decent shot but I feel as if my pin float is not normal. I shoot a lot of 3D shoots so I’m trying to get all I can.


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Discussion Starter #8
Don't focus so much on holding steady and watch how much steadier you hold. Takes a bit to shut your brain off tho
I do that. I draw back and set up. Get on target and relax and let my pin float. When it settles on the dot I squeeze my shot off. Some days i hold dead on and can’t hardly float off a dot. Other days I can’t hold on a 6” diameter circle.


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Discussion Starter #9
Do you shoot holding against the wall or from the middle of the valley? You might take out a few twists in the cable and hold more firmly onto the backend of the valley/ wall.

IMO, form is what holds the pin still and accessories as there to accentuate it.


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I hold firm on the back. I don’t hold a lot of pressure like some people do. I switch from shooting hard on the back wall to shooting softer on the back wall. I don’t notice a difference either way.


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Smilin' Bob
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Il I don’t notice a difference either way.
Not trying to sound jerkish, but not noticing a difference is a long ways from documenting no difference.

Run each method for a week or more and keep score and more importantly notes on how it feels and the resultant sight picture. You may notice a slight dip at first in any method, but if your scores get higher over time you’ve found something to work with.



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Hey first off I'm not an expert at all, but recently I've been using a much longer stabilizer like 28". I also added the quivalizer to my halon which a lot of people don't like, but it sticks out quite a ways and I've found that a longer stabilizer makes a big difference. I used to have a 12" and I can say there's no comparison. I don't know what your hunting situation is, but if you can handle a longer stabilizer then I recommend it.

P.S. In my opinion the quivalizer is awesome. It's quick to move from the quiver position to the stabilizer position when spot and stalking and I don't find that there's any greater effect from the wind than a regular stabilizer and quiver.


I want to start with I am no expert either. I used to fight it until I too went with a longer stabilizer. It really helped me settle down. I use a 14" Bee Stinger.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I want to start with I am no expert either. I used to fight it until I too went with a longer stabilizer. It really helped me settle down. I use a 14" Bee Stinger.
I like to keep it under 12” due to staying in a bowhunter class for 3D shoots.


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If you can't go longer on the stab then get a back bar. They do help. You may have to tinker more than the front bar since you can change the weight and the angle of them.

That said, IMO consistent issues tend to be gear issues and inconsistent issues tend to be shooter issues. Pay attention to your grip and how you set up before the shot. I've started to notice that I have a way that I'll get my grip wrong and I feel it as I draw. It seems to put a bit of torque into the equation. I've started letting down and re starting when I notice it. I can feel the skin at the base of my thumb twist up and bind as I draw. It never seems to end well. So there may be something you are not doing as consistently as you think you are that could be contributing to the float.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you can't go longer on the stab then get a back bar. They do help. You may have to tinker more than the front bar since you can change the weight and the angle of them.

That said, IMO consistent issues tend to be gear issues and inconsistent issues tend to be shooter issues. Pay attention to your grip and how you set up before the shot. I've started to notice that I have a way that I'll get my grip wrong and I feel it as I draw. It seems to put a bit of torque into the equation. I've started letting down and re starting when I notice it. I can feel the skin at the base of my thumb twist up and bind as I draw. It never seems to end well. So there may be something you are not doing as consistently as you think you are that could be contributing to the float.
Thanks. I went through a bunch of shot form videos by rcrchery on YouTube. Gonna try to concentrate on the things he talked about.


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I actually found that a properly set up side bar really does help. I tried to use one on each side and it was okay, but took the one off the right size and my float slowed down a ton. It's worth having one in my opinion.

If you can't go longer on the stab then get a back bar. They do help. You may have to tinker more than the front bar since you can change the weight and the angle of them.

That said, IMO consistent issues tend to be gear issues and inconsistent issues tend to be shooter issues. Pay attention to your grip and how you set up before the shot. I've started to notice that I have a way that I'll get my grip wrong and I feel it as I draw. It seems to put a bit of torque into the equation. I've started letting down and re starting when I notice it. I can feel the skin at the base of my thumb twist up and bind as I draw. It never seems to end well. So there may be something you are not doing as consistently as you think you are that could be contributing to the float.
 

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The Ranch Fairy
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You have target panic a little bit.
EZV Sight will solve.

Target panic is not form flaw. Its your brain not wanting to see anything in front of what you want to hit.
It’s ok man. 50-70% of archers have target panic and compensate for it somehow.
Very hard to manage a shot sequence when your brain is doing loops and heart pounding in a hunting situation. Simple wins when adrenaline runs wild.

Trust me. I had it for years. Shot a longbow for 10 years because it was so bad.
But, No more man. Just don’t tell everyone.....every video on my channel, every pig, day, night, tree, ground......
EZV Sight.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You have target panic a little bit.
EZV Sight will solve.

Target panic is not form flaw. Its your brain not wanting to see anything in front of what you want to hit.
It’s ok man. 50-70% of archers have target panic and compensate for it somehow.
Very hard to manage a shot sequence when your brain is doing loops and heart pounding in a hunting situation. Simple wins when adrenaline runs wild.

Trust me. I had it for years. Shot a longbow for 10 years because it was so bad.
But, No more man. Just don’t tell everyone.....every video on my channel, every pig, day, night, tree, ground......
EZV Sight.
I disagree. For one I can hit an animal no problem. My problem isn’t hitting a pie plate at 50 yards. I still group arrows at 50 yards. I just have to punch my release. And before someone tells me how punching isn’t right and blah blah blah. A lot of good shooters punch. I don’t anticipate my shot I just punch my trigger. I feel like some of the replies I’m getting assume that I’m a bad shot. I shoot top ten on pretty much every shoot. And most people would say I’m a good shot. Not trying to brag by no means or be cocky at all. I’m not trying to control my shot like some people have said. I do think my form may be off somewhere. I think it’s in my stance and back and shoulders. I get a lot of shoulder fatigue after shooting a lot of arrows at once. I’m going to work on my form this week. I guess I need to shoot a group at 50 and post a picture. I know most people wouldn’t complain about my groups but I’m complaining about my pin float. When I shoot a back tension release my group is probably 6” in diameter at 50 yards. When I shoot a thumb trigger it’s probably 2”-3”. It’s not bad with my thumb release. But when I shoot back tension and don’t know when it’s gonna go off. My group falls apart.


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When I shoot a thumb trigger it’s probably 2”-3”. It’s not bad with my thumb release. But when I shoot back tension and don’t know when it’s gonna go off. My group falls apart.


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Let me guess, it's taking longer for your hinge to go off than your thumb release? I love shooting a hinge. But I simply don't have enough time right now to get my firing engine running right. It was taking too long on the 3D course. So I went back to my index. The longer it takes for the shot to go off the more the float starts to break down. Could be wrong, but that's my first assumption.
 

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One Shot
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The best thing to help your float is STOP trying to control your float. 3 things that control float. Or I say the top 3.
1. Correct draw length.
2. Front shoulder out and down
3. Back shoulder down., Elbow above your ear.

Now with those keep a relaxed bow hand, soft elbow, extended but relaxxeeddd.pull into your wall and keep a steady eassssyyyy pull and the arrows gone. Let your pin float around the 10 ring at 20 yards but keep your eye on the X.
For my shooting, this is the best advice in the thread.
And yes back bars work, if forced to choose I'd take a back bar before a front bar personally.
 
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