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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I'm just lost trying to figure out how field rounds are scored. I have the latest issue of Archery and they have all the field results inside.

For instance, on the Midwestern Sectionals, they list 28 Field + 14 Hunter + 14 Animal then a total. I also see that at the NFAA Great Lakes Outdoor Sectional and the Mid-Atlantic Sectionals they had 28 Field, 14 Animal, and 28 Hunter. Is there no standardization? How would the shooter at the Midwestern Sectional rank himself vrs. the shooter from the Mid-Atlantic when they don't shoot the same targets/distances/number of targets? I don't get it..????

Scores for the champion in the Midwestern section were: 551 278 291 for a total of 1120.

Could someone explain to me what the total possible score would be for each category and how each is scored (eg 12 - 10 - 8 - 5 - 0) and whether or not the distances are known or unknown.

I'm sure that it's old hat for most of you, but I just look at these scores and assume that they're very good, but how good? For instance, a friend that I've met at the some of the NFAA indoor 300 shoots told me at Yankton that he shot a field round and got a 1000-something. Not knowing what to say, I said, "Oh, that sounds really good..." and felt like a bonehead.. :lol:

Thanks.
Tom
 

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hear in the east field targets are the same color black and white the field target has a black center with an x in the middle the next ring is white and the next ring is black scoring is I believe 5-3-1-0 the hunter targets are all black and the center ring is white with an x there are lines on the targets that show you where the rings are in the hunter targets and also scored 5-3-1-0 the 12-10-8-5-0 that you have mentioned is for 3-D shooting. its been awhile since I shot field so if I gave you any wrong info will someone please correct me but I think I am correct. on a 28 target course the highest score you can get is a 560 and that is based on shooting 4 arrows at each target. hope this helps you out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
OK, I just read http://www.nfaa-archery.org/field/info.cfm about 4 times and I think that I understand....

So every distance is known.....

On field targets, 4 arrows per target, 5 max points per arrow, 20 max points per target..... (does the arrow scoring go 5-4-3-2-1-0??)

Hunter is a black face with a white spot. Again, 4 arrows per target, 20 max points per target...

Animal is a 2D animal picture on a bale. With an X-ring bonus, vitals, and non-vitals. 3 arrows, 1st arrow from farthest distance scored 21-20-19. What I don't understand is that to shoot the 2nd and 3rd arrow, do you have to miss the ENTIRE animal to move up to the next stake and shoot 2nd arrow scored 18-17-16. And the same for arrow #3, scored 15-14-13.???

What I'm still not understanding with the animal, if you hit anywhere on the animal (outside of the vitals) with arrow #1 you don't have to shoot at that again? So a shot in the animal's butt at the farthest distance with arrow #1 is better than an X-ring from the second or third stake??
Sorry if these sound like dumb questions. I'd like to try it sometime, but would like to know how it all works before just going out there.

Thanks
 

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All the 14 target units are STANDARD...and MUST have the same number of shots from the same distances...however, the ORDER of the target sequences is up to the individual clubs.

A 28 target round consists of TWO 14-target units, scored 5 points for the bullseye and X-ring, 4 points for the next ring, and 3 points for the outer ring.

Field faces have a black dot with a white X-ring in the middle of it (scores 5 points for all of it), then a white area separated with a line halfway out (this is for expert scoring, which isn't used much)...this entire area scores 4 points. Then the outer black area, divided in half with a white line(which is for expert scoring) all of which is scored 3 points. TOUCHING the area or line gives you the higher value.

On the HUNTER targets, the target is all black out the outer area and has a white spot with a black x-ring in the center. All of the dot and x-ring counts five points. The next area is 4 points, and the outer circle is 3 points. outside of that is zero.

Field distances range in 5 yard increments from 15 yards thru 80 yards, plus a "bunny" target that is 35 feet, 30 feet, 25 feet, and 20 feet, with on arrow from each of those distances).

Hunter rounds vary in distance from 15 yards thru 70 yards, with most of the targets being "walkups", which means you either shoot 2 arrows from two distances on the target, or one arrow from each of 4 distances on the target. The differing target is again the bunny, shot at 11 yards...with one arrow at each of four target faces placed vertically on the butt.

All total score possible for 14 targets is 280 points, with the total possible for 28 being 560. You shoot 4 arrows per target, for 112 shots per total round.

The animal round differs in the fact you basically get one shot at each target...if you hit the animal at all. If you miss the animal, then you take a second shot from a different stake, for a possible lesser value. Max number of shots is 3. You take the score you get once you hit inside either the dot, the vital, or the animal body. Only ONE arrow scores

Each Section or State decides how many "targets" will be shot for their championship.

So there IS absolutely STANDARD scoring for each target, and a set number of distances are also standard. The differences only lies in the numbers of targets shot depending upon the tournament.

They are easily compared once you know that 280 is possible on 14 targets of field or hunter, and 560 is possible on 28 targets of field or hunter.

280 or 560 is possible on the animal as well, but the "dot" on the animal counts as an additional point..so the "actual" total possible on the animal is really 588.

What makes field so much fun is the sequence of the layout of the targets you will shoot, and of course the lay of the land. you might shoot an 80 yard walkup, and the next target could be a 15 yarder....or it might be a 35 fan.

But one thing for certain...on each given 14 target half (called a "unit"), you will only have ONE 80 yard walkup, ONE 35 fan, one 45 yarder, one bunny, one 15 yarder, etc, etc, etc. You cannot have two 35 fans or two 30 yarders in the same 14-target unit.

But you COULD shoot two 80 yarders within a couple of targets, depending upon where you start on a given 14 target unit and what the sequencing is on the next one.

field14
 

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Tom
Then if you do as a lot of ATers did a couple of months back and shoot the international version IFAA Field there is no extra point on the animals. The shaft must cut the line to score the higher value and you do not straddle the shooting line your foot must be within 6 inches from the side or behind the peg not in front.
Of all the ATers that shot the World championships Got Lucky (Miss Lucky) came away with the most improved score (it was her first field shoot) so go and have a go, you could become a world champ. You never never know if you never never go:thumbs_up
Cheers
Peter
 

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here's the typical, avg guy scoring that everyone uses unless specified as 'expert' scoring. then, it becomes 5-4-3-2-1 scoring on the field face.



animal round is a bit different. this is just the highlite of the important part. you carry 3 arrows, yes. you dont need to shoot all 3, if you shoot a hi zone with the first arrow, no need to shoot another. yes, all distances are known.....but it doesnt automatically guarentee a spot. YOU still have to make the shot and PUT the shot in the X

if you shoot a low first arrow and a hi second arrow, only the first arrow counts. highest scoring arrow will be scored. it is important you number your arrows and shoot them in the proper order so you get the proper score. shooting off the paper with arrow #2 at say 53 yds, you move up to 48yds and shoot a spot with the #1 arrow, you will only get the second arrow score of 16+1, for a total of 17, not a 21(20+1). there have been tournies lost, won and protested because of scoring issues.

4. Shooting Rules: A maximum of three marked arrows may be shot, in successive order, and the highest scoring arrow will count. In the case of walk-up targets the first arrow must be shot from the farthest stake, the second arrow from the middle stake, and the third arrow from the nearest stake, in order to be scored. No archer shall advance to the target and then return to the stake to shoot again in the event of a missed arrow.

5. Scoring:
5.1

20 or 18 for the first arrow
16 or 14 for the second arrow
12 or 10 for the third arrow
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys, that helps a lot. It sure looks like fun. I guess that I better start practicing that 80 yard shot.....
 

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The X moves,

Actually, in reality, it would serve you better to just get a decent 80 and 70 setting, and practice the heck out of everything from 45 yards in....those are points you can ill afford to miss! Take your "4" on the 80 and the occasional "5"....but you can't afford too many 19's or 18's or less on ANYTHING from 45 yards in.

Only 2 shots from 80 and 2 from 70 the entire 28 targets....but lots of arrows are shot from 45 yards and closer.

field14:confused: :tongue: :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Gotcha. Thanks Field14. Sounds like excellent advice. Going to really have to practice. I've been working hard on indoor 20 yard NFAA 5-spot faces. Approaching the 300 barrier, but not quite yet! :mad:

Once I get confidence built there, who knows? I'd sure at least like to try field rounds at least sometime next year.

Thanks again for the great info.!!! :) :)
 

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field14 said:
The X moves,

Actually, in reality, it would serve you better to just get a decent 80 and 70 setting, and practice the heck out of everything from 45 yards in....those are points you can ill afford to miss! Take your "4" on the 80 and the occasional "5"....but you can't afford too many 19's or 18's or less on ANYTHING from 45 yards in.

Only 2 shots from 80 and 2 from 70 the entire 28 targets....but lots of arrows are shot from 45 yards and closer.

field14:confused: :tongue: :wink:
Yeah . . . what he said. I'm a newbie to field myself this year and I shoot Bowhunter-class equipment. (Though a couple goofy NFAA rules actually put me in unlimited). But regardless, I only worry enough about the 80 yarder to get it on paper. As long as I score a 3 with it, I'm usually happy. Typically, I get a 4. The 70 yarder isn't all that hard if you have a 60 yard pin. I can usually get it close.
 

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Hi X,
I just shot my first season of NFAA outdoor target and had a great time. Don't let the marked yardage fool you, you still have to execute the shot. You also shoot 112 arrows plus 8 practice on a standard 28 target field round, that's a lot of shooting. I just shot the Indiana State Outdoor shoot last weekend. 28 field targets Saturday followed with 14 hunter and 14 animal on Sunday. Don't forget there's a lot of walking invloved too. It makes for a challenging weekend, but loads of fun. I picked up a bow for the first time last winter and started shooting indoor dots and have shot some type of archery tournament or league every week since. I can't get enough. Happy shooting.
 
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