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I pull 70# (well really its like 67 or something) I primarily hunt Whitetail. What does everyone else pull and does it really matter?
 

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I hunt whitetail only and pull 72#. It's overkill with the 73 ft-lbs of KE I'm putting out shooting a 410gr arrow, but I can pull the weight easily and my bow is max'd out.

I think 45# is the minimum recommended KE to cleanly kill a whitetail.
 

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Back Yard Champion
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I have 2 bows set up for hunting. One is set to 67 pounds and the other to 62. Can't tell the difference in killing whitetail deer. Probably will turn down the one set to 67 to 62 or so.
 

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I had a torn rotator cuff I'm working back to 70, shot yesterday kind of soar.
Will continue, hard to draw when it is cold. The new Hoyt Z3 cams are smooth.
 

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Retired GI "still serv'n"
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70 pounds for my tree and stalking bow and 60 pounds for my groundblind bow.
I think 60 pounds is quite efficient for deer as long as you are accurate. :wink:
 

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Currently I shoot 64#'s, but my new bow will be a 60# MAX bow. With today's technology and new equipment. 60#'s gets the job done on any N. American game animal.

My shoulders are getting older, and the 60# bow will be sufficient for me. Oh yeah, it will be spitting arrows at 325+fps too! :wink:
 

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i shoot 70# for elk and deer
 

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56#s the last 2 years, as sholders and age are creeping in. My son's best friend killed a 325#, 7x7 with double drop tines, @ 41#s with her Ultra Tec. Complete pass through.

I'm impressed when I read that Randy Ulmer and Bill Winke, former 80# shooters are now shooting 60#. Best of luck and good shootin'.
 

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47# on my recurve and 60# on my Legacy. Both are plenty for deer where I live. The recurve draws smooth and easy, the Legacy I can draw sitting down and hold the bow infront on me a draw it straight back. I can't do that with a 70# bow. Some can I am sure but I ain't one of them. I think most people are over bowed, especially traditional shooters. It dosn't take much to kill a deer.
 

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I pull 70#. Do I need to pull 70#, no, but I am comfortable doing it and I shoot well at 70#.
 

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Team #12 - 2009 Winners!!
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I shoot 70 and 90, the 90# I dont know why, I can so right now I am:wink:, my dad shoots 60# and my girlfriend shoots 36#, she got 2 deer, so is 60,70, and 90 enough? sure is:darkbeer:
 

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Bowhemian
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I had a torn rotator cuff I'm working back to 70, shot yesterday kind of soar.
Will continue, hard to draw when it is cold. The new Hoyt Z3 cams are smooth.
Possum,

This message is puzzling to me. You say you had a torn rotator cuff but are now working your way back to pulling a 70# bow? :eek:

How many times do you pull that draw weight in an average practice session?

What caused your rotator cuff to tear in the first place?
 

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Bow down to the man camz
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Early season I like to pull 70 pounds. Late season I will switch it up to 60 pounds and one inch shorter draw length. When sitting in cold temps I tend to stiffen up. The shorter draw length helps with the heavier clothing. Fifty pounds is all that is needed to kill whitetails all day long with fixed blade broadheads. Good shot placement is the main key.
 

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Bowhemian
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My first bow was a 78# Bear Kodiak Magnum recurve, which I purchased out of sheer ignorance. At the time I was an active bodybuilder in my mid-20s and having pulled my friend's target bow, which seemed exceptionally easy, I felt that the 78 pounder was a better choice for a big strong fellow like me.

So I joined my friend's archery club, spent the afternoon pulling that beast about fifty or so times while learning the basics of recurve shooting -- and was unable to move my right arm for the next two days!

After recovering from that lesson I went at it more cautiously, having learned the hard way that the heavier the draw weight the faster the shooter's muscles fatigue. So I sold the Kodiak Magnum and bought a 47# Bear Temujin, a beautiful, smooth-shooting recurve which was more suitable for target shooting and I was able to pull it at least thirty times before experiencing the first subtle effect of muscle and ligament fatigue.

Today I shoot a 45# compound bow, about fifty times a day, almost every day. I shoot spots only so there is absolutely no reason for me to pull more weight than that.
 
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