Archery Talk Forum banner

Premier Archery Patriot Compound Bow with Pendulum Sight

1366 Views 18 Replies 14 Participants Last post by  Mr. Ken
Has anyone owned or ever seen another model of this bow? I understand that bows don't hold their pedigree as firearms do but it's a shame to ignore such craftsmanship and not give credit where credit is due. I was gifted this bow some time ago and recently had it refurbished to total functionality by kballer1. Since then I have outfitted it with the same gear I received with it plus a new arrow rest. I am asking for curiosity's sake, discussion, and of course to help other owners and enthusiasts as I haven't been able to find much at all. Even the sight (which I have been told is an Eliminator) seems to have a short dead-end in history and information. It shoots well and I'm not selling but just curious.
Wood Twig Wire Cable Fashion accessory
Wood Luggage and bags Bag Clothes hanger Wire

Bicycle tire Musical instrument Automotive tire Bicycle fork Wood

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Gas Machine Electrical wiring

Leg Dog Wood Asphalt Fawn

Font Electronic device Electric blue Gadget Handwriting
  • Like
Reactions: JeffB
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

· Shootin and Cussin
Joined
·
27,296 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: JeffB

· Registered
Joined
·
2,619 Posts
Kballer did a fantastic job with the cables. I was the man that re-cables the bows when I worked at Archery shops in the 70s and 80s and I can say that he did a fantastic job, and he probably did it with no cable specs.

I still have a PSE Lazer Magnum with cables, and it was a great bow to shoot. I took it out last year and could not believe how I could love that bow. Compared to the bows I shoot today, that bow felt terrible. 46" axel-to-axel and with horrible hand shock. It had no speed and was hard to hold on target, yet I shot my highest scores in my life with that bow because it was the best we had back then.

Your bow might feel great now but try a bow made in the last 5 years and you will not believe the difference. I can understand using such an old bow if you are strapped for cash. But if you have $300, you can buy a used bow under 5 years old and I can guarantee that it will shoot smoother, be faster, and make you a much better shot and hunter. Take it from a guy that has shot bows since the 50s and saw the improvement in bows over the years.
 

· Registered
2009 PSE bow madness xs
Joined
·
1,688 Posts
That is a great rebuild. Beautiful job. Take care of it and enjoy shooting it. I would get some xx75 aluminum arrows just to put everything in the same time era. Don’t get rid of it unless you don’t like archery anymore. Great history
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've seen a Springy Thingy but never shot with it. Such a simple device, I'll keep it in mind and I'll ask around. Maybe a friend might have one I can try out. Thanks!
Kballer did a fantastic job with the cables. I was the man that re-cables the bows when I worked at Archery shops in the 70s and 80s and I can say that he did a fantastic job, and he probably did it with no cable specs.

I still have a PSE Lazer Magnum with cables, and it was a great bow to shoot. I took it out last year and could not believe how I could love that bow. Compared to the bows I shoot today, that bow felt terrible. 46" axel-to-axel and with horrible hand shock. It had no speed and was hard to hold on target, yet I shot my highest scores in my life with that bow because it was the best we had back then.

Your bow might feel great now but try a bow made in the last 5 years and you will not believe the difference. I can understand using such an old bow if you are strapped for cash. But if you have $300, you can buy a used bow under 5 years old and I can guarantee that it will shoot smoother, be faster, and make you a much better shot and hunter. Take it from a guy that has shot bows since the 50s and saw the improvement in bows over the years.
Yes kballer1 did a great job! Everyone around here were not skilled to finish the job yet he has it done in less than a day or so.
I've shot some of the newer bows and you are right they shoot straight, smooth, and accurate without much fuss. They certainly have evolved. I was admiring this bow at my local pawn shop and my daughter bought it for me for my birthday. So it's become rather hard to give up. I'll hold on to it for awhile especially as it's usable again.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That is a great rebuild. Beautiful job. Take care of it and enjoy shooting it. I would get some xx75 aluminum arrows just to put everything in the same time era. Don’t get rid of it unless you don’t like archery anymore. Great history
Thank you. I planned on target shooting for fun. It will be around for awhile. I've grown fond of it due to it's wood construction as it's something you don't see anymore. And it's how it's all started so I find it rather special.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,955 Posts
Nothing prettier than old style laminated recurve limbs.

Enjoy!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nothing prettier than old style laminated recurve limbs.

Enjoy!
In researching some of the esthetics of this bow I did run a search for "recurve compound bow", but came up with some new hybrid model. Does this old recurve design offer any advantages as I've seen it before? I suppose the newer models are better but just curious.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,955 Posts
In researching some of the esthetics of this bow I did run a search for "recurve compound bow", but came up with some new hybrid model. Does this old recurve design offer any advantages as I've seen it before? I suppose the newer models are better but just curious.
For a long time, there was a line of thinking that recurve limbs on a compound bow would be a smoother draw than a straight limb because of their construction (a hold over from traditional archery) . That's pretty much BS once you introduce wheels/cams/eccentrics- usually straight limb bows of the time were shorter than recurve limbs in length and produced less overall bow length and brace height, which made the bow store more energy for a given draw length, so they seemed more stout as you were drawing them. It wasn't the limb itself being smoother (or not) because of it's construction, it was the overall geometry differences between the two.

Laminated limbs are often touted as strongest. Really depends on how well they are made- back in those days, straight limbs were often cheap molded glass construction, and laminated limbs were often better. Not all recurve limbs back then were laminated though- some were solid glass (Golden Eagle, e.g.) With modern materials and construction, recurve limbs went the way of the do-do- I'm guessing Hoyt was probably the last holdout into the Y2Ks.

Aesthetically though, I have fond memories of my old recurve limbed bows from Golden Eagle, Hoyt, Bear/Jennings, High Country and others.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
For a long time, there was a line of thinking that recurve limbs on a compound bow would be a smoother draw than a straight limb because of their construction (a hold over from traditional archery) . That's pretty much BS once you introduce wheels/cams/eccentrics- usually straight limb bows of the time were shorter than recurve limbs in length and produced less overall bow length and brace height, which made the bow store more energy for a given draw length, so they seemed more stout as you were drawing them. It wasn't the limb itself being smoother (or not) because of it's construction, it was the overall geometry differences between the two.

Laminated limbs are often touted as strongest. Really depends on how well they are made- back in those days, straight limbs were often cheap molded glass construction, and laminated limbs were often better. Not all recurve limbs back then were laminated though- some were solid glass (Golden Eagle, e.g.) With modern materials and construction, recurve limbs went the way of the do-do- I'm guessing Hoyt was probably the last holdout into the Y2Ks.

Aesthetically though, I have fond memories of my old recurve limbed bows from Golden Eagle, Hoyt, Bear/Jennings, High Country and others.
How things evolve.....I remember buying my first compound bow, a Bear, at a Kmart. It too was similar in design to this recurve. I've been to my local archery shop recently and none of the current bows are made of wood. Even the recurves are a composite of sorts. I'd pay for a good recurve take down made similar to my compound out of laminate wood. Matching set? Lol!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Thank you. I planned on target shooting for fun. It will be around for awhile. I've grown fond of it due to it's wood construction as it's something you don't see anymore. And it's how it's all started so I find it rather special.
I got a bunch of xx75 arrows I won’t ever use I’d let u have some if u want to pay the shipping if so just pm me
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,163 Posts
Kballer did a fantastic job with the cables. I was the man that re-cables the bows when I worked at Archery shops in the 70s and 80s and I can say that he did a fantastic job, and he probably did it with no cable specs.

I still have a PSE Lazer Magnum with cables, and it was a great bow to shoot. I took it out last year and could not believe how I could love that bow. Compared to the bows I shoot today, that bow felt terrible. 46" axel-to-axel and with horrible hand shock. It had no speed and was hard to hold on target, yet I shot my highest scores in my life with that bow because it was the best we had back then.

Your bow might feel great now but try a bow made in the last 5 years and you will not believe the difference. I can understand using such an old bow if you are strapped for cash. But if you have $300, you can buy a used bow under 5 years old and I can guarantee that it will shoot smoother, be faster, and make you a much better shot and hunter. Take it from a guy that has shot bows since the 50s and saw the improvement in bows over the years.
The PSE Lazer was the 1st compound that I shot in bowhunter class back in 1985 and 1986. I shot a 291 on an NFAA 5 spot with fingers shooting that bow. While shooting at another outdoor match, the cast riser broke in my hand while at full draw. PSE replaced it with a Laser Magnum very quickly. I thought it had the smoothest draw cycle of any bow. I still like the built up grip on the riser of that PSE Laser. Sometimes I almost wish I had another one with 50 pound limbs and 29 inch draw to play around with. You can not find a PSE Lazer or Lazer Magnum bow anywhere.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top