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I'm getting old Lol. Every half year or so I've been severely straining a shoulder muscle... Too many 80 lb bow tunes! Can anyone describe or show a good way to stretch the shoulder muscles before shooting? Time for me to start taking care of myself better. My son is getting started and I want to be at this game for as long as I can.
 

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I'm getting old Lol. Every half year or so I've been severely straining a shoulder muscle... Too many 80 lb bow tunes! Can anyone describe or show a good way to stretch the shoulder muscles before shooting? Time for me to start taking care of myself better. My son is getting started and I want to be at this game for as long as I can.
Use the LIGHTEST stretch bands you can find.





Especially the 2nd stretch.

You can always grip the stretch band loop, and make a smaller loop or double the loop
to increase the tension during the stretch.

Use a VERY light poundage stretch band,
to substitute for the recurve bows in the pictures.
 

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I have an undergraduate in Kinesiology (despite the fact that I'm now a school teacher).

If you've ever been involved in baseball, there are several stretches that involve the rotator and scapula regions. Things as simple as pulling your arm across your body (across your chest) seem boring and old fashioned, but are very effective. Arms circles is another one. Don't shy away from what's worked for centuries.

If you're looking to make a few purchases, I'd suggest bands like said above and/or a swimming pool noodle. Place the noodle in between your shoulder blades running vertical and allow your shoulders to ease back, stretching the pectoral/frontal shoulder.

Get some light dumb bells and make strength training a part of your weekly routine - should presses, flies - can greatly improve your strength by doing light weight and more reps
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys... Exactly what I was looking for
 

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I have an undergraduate in Kinesiology (despite the fact that I'm now a school teacher).

If you've ever been involved in baseball, there are several stretches that involve the rotator and scapula regions. Things as simple as pulling your arm across your body (across your chest) seem boring and old fashioned, but are very effective. Arms circles is another one. Don't shy away from what's worked for centuries.

If you're looking to make a few purchases, I'd suggest bands like said above and/or a swimming pool noodle. Place the noodle in between your shoulder blades running vertical and allow your shoulders to ease back, stretching the pectoral/frontal shoulder.

Get some light dumb bells and make strength training a part of your weekly routine - should presses, flies - can greatly improve your strength by doing light weight and more reps
+1 from a strength and conditioning major
 

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http://www.leehayward.com/rear_delts.htm


When most people train their shoulders they usually include plenty of exercises for the front deltoids, side deltoids, and the trapezius muscles. But the rear deltoids are most often neglected.

Well developed rear delts will help to keep your shoulders balanced and help to prevent a lot of shoulder injuries and rotator cuff problems. Very often the front delts are strong from lots of pressing movements (bench presses, overhead presses, etc.) so they over power the rear delts.
Strong rear delts will also help to improve your strength in exercises such as the bench press. With a strong well developed upper back you will be more solid on the bench and be able to generate more power. They will also help your squat because the bar is placed across your upper back. By having big strong rear delts and traps you will be able to stabilize the bar better and not hunch over in the squat. Just look at anyone who has a big bench press and / or squat and you will see that they also have well developed rear delts and upper back muscles.
Here are are some exercises that will target your rear delts and upper back. Since this is a small muscle group you should train with fairly light weights and do higher reps, between 10-20 reps per set. Focus on feeling the muscles working with each rep....
 

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Ken another thing some of my friends who compete in Olympic lifting do, their shoulders take some major abuse going overhead with that much weight, is roll something like a lacrosse ball along the fascia in the upper body to relieve some tension in those areas. This picture highlights some of the major zones where fascia can be found in the body.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1363745397.018311.jpg
 
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