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pro shooters with overdraws?I Don't understand.

1363 Views 30 Replies 24 Participants Last post by  jamaro
Why are some of the pro shooters going back to an overdraw.I seen some of the top Hoyt dot shooters at the last ASA.They were shooting the known 50 class.And they had overdraws on there Vantage pro and Vantage elites.I have even seen Jeff Hopkins shooting an overdraw on his C4 what is going on what do they know that I don't?
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maybe it's so that they can shoot a little slower and more forgiving bow and still get their speed. They're only shooting 1 or 2 inches behind the riser.
 

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A guess would be the contact point between the rest and the arrow shaft is directly, or close to being, over their wrist.

I think the theory is that with the shaft/rest position in that location, "the shot" is less prone to the effects of torque or hand position.
 

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They are good enough shots that they dont need as much bh and figure if they can get the arrow off of the string quicker it will probably help:wink:

just a theory
 

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They are good enough shots that they dont need as much bh and figure if they can get the arrow off of the string quicker it will probably help
Not arguing the good enough shot part :), just wanted to note that an overdraw does not get the arrow off the string quicker. BH remains the same regardless. Arrow will be clearing the arrow rest a little quicker, but time on the string remains constant :).

Betting also it has to do with moving the pivot point for the rest/arrow contact closer to the wrist. Doesn't Broadwater already do this, and has for years?

>>------->
 

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A guess would be the contact point between the rest and the arrow shaft is directly, or close to being, over their wrist.

I think the theory is that with the shaft/rest position in that location, "the shot" is less prone to the effects of torque or hand position.
You are more or less correct.... Jesse shoots one as well and has for the past couple years. :)
 

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Not arguing the good enough shot part :), just wanted to note that an overdraw does not get the arrow off the string quicker. BH remains the same regardless. Arrow will be clearing the arrow rest a little quicker, but time on the string remains constant :).

Betting also it has to do with moving the pivot point for the rest/arrow contact closer to the wrist. Doesn't Broadwater already do this, and has for years?

>>------->
Yep...that is pretty much what Jesse and Shane told me as the reason as to why they shoot them...
 

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In essence

You are more or less correct.... Jesse shoots one as well and has for the past couple years. :)
It doesnt make any sense to me, but who am I to tell Mr Broadwater he's whack. I suppose when a guy can aim and execute shots like those pros they can get away with things that others would think twice about attempting. You wont see my bow sporting one of those contraptions any time soon.:confused:
 

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The pivot point is the answer. If you get the pivot point of the rest over the wrist the effect of left & right movement is reduced. Its easy to see, just pick up your bow & wiggle it left & right. Notice how much right above the grip moves, also look just behind the grip & there is a sweet spot that is affected less because the wrist is the pivot.
 

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Not arguing the good enough shot part :), just wanted to note that an overdraw does not get the arrow off the string quicker. BH remains the same regardless. Arrow will be clearing the arrow rest a little quicker, but time on the string remains constant :).

Betting also it has to do with moving the pivot point for the rest/arrow contact closer to the wrist. Doesn't Broadwater already do this, and has for years?

>>------->
BINGO! Nothing to do with arrow speed here. They simply find it a more forgiving setup to get the pivot point over the wrist.
 

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My guess would be that a shorter arrow is obviously lighter and faster, and also shooting a shorter arrow would allow you to go to an arrow with a lighter spine which is also going to be even lighter and faster yet, thus you can cut weight two different ways and pick up a ton of speed.

I am currently shooting X-weave 200s at 29" through my 82nd Airborne and my arrow weight is 322gr with about a 53# draw weight. If I go to the next lighter shaft and cut them at 27" I would be shooting a 275 gr arrow. That would make for a ton of extra speed. My guess would be that I would go from shooting 314fps to about 330fps by being able to shoot a shorter and lighter shaft while still maintaining a proper spine. My math is probably not the greatest, but I'll bet I am close.

Automan
 

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BINGO! Nothing to do with arrow speed here. They simply find it a more forgiving setup to get the pivot point over the wrist.
Yep it has nothing to do with speed....MOST of the guys doing it are spot shooters. They even shoot them indoors.

Say you cut 2"s off your shaft....if you are shooting say a 3-39...that is only going to drop your arrow weight 16-17 grains. That is gonna gain ya nothing speed wise for the most part...:)

Even if you are able to drop arrow spine.....say going from a 3-39 to a 3-28 (for me I could drop). I still wouldn't be gaining a lot speed wise...a 26" 3-39 will weigh 224 grains (just the shaft) and dropping to a 3-28 the shaft will still weigh 211 grains......that's still only gonna be about 3 fps.
 
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