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I would like some personal opinions on the proelite vs vantage elite I have a proelite that shoots well ,is the vantage better?
 

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My instructor has both and loves them both. He did tell me thought that the Vantage Elite is a awesome and forgiving bow. I'll try and tell him to reply to your thread.
 

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I'll muddy the water a bit, and say take a look at the Vantage Pro too. I love mine. It's the non-shoot through version of the Vantage Elite.

I have now sold my Pro Elites, and replaced with Vantage Pros.
 

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the solid hard wall of the VE is the diff.

yeah, changeover to the VE much better than the PE although may take you about 1 week to come 'round to it. I've had both, now PE is obsolete.
 

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I had a friend who has shot the proelite, ultraelite, and vantage elite tell me this. He said he loved the way the proelite aimed, but shot better groups with the ultra. With the vantage he says it holds like the pro and groups like the ultra. To him it's the best of both worlds.

I have another friend who was shooting a proelite and has just switched to a vantage. He absolutely loves the Vantage. But in the end it all comes down to how you feel and shoot with the bow. There is definatley nothing wrong with your proelite. And the expense of a Vantage is considerable. Personally, once I get the chance I think I will pick up a Vantage and make the switch.
 

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I love mine!!

I have a pair of VE's & they are tack drivers.. My first outing this season on the field round & I shot a 560 over the period of 2 days. 14 targets each day. I was impressed to say the least. If you are going to spend the money, go for the Elite rather than the Pro any day.

Mine at 29.5", 60 lbs, 373 grain Pro Tour X10 is doing 281 FPS!!! It aims like a dream!

-Adam
 

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I shot proelite with c2 for two years. No doubt it is a great bow and i received my new VE yesterday. After set it up and shoot for short and long distance....i decide to sell off my proelite.
 

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Vantage Elite

I absolutely LOVE my Vantage Elite, I have owned the Proelite (XT3000 and Spirals) and the Vantage feels much more solid and aims VERY easy, so easy in fact that my pin doesn't "float" on the spot, it just sits there. I told a buddy that I am scared that I will develop target panic because I can hold on the spot so steady! I am very excited for all my field tournaments this year!
 

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I agree with BowOnly.

To me it is more related to limbs configuration:
I owned a Protec with XT2000 and spirals.
Now I own two Ultraelite, originally fitted with same limbs, one with spirals and the other one with C2. I have changed the limbs to XT3000, cause they better fits me.
The feeling has changed a lot!
I had to tinker a little bit more to have the ones with XT3000 aims as steady as the others.
XT2000 gives you a very solid feel both at aiming and at release. You feel just a little "STUP" and nothing else.

I've tried the Vantage Elite, that has more or less the same AA lenght, and I got back the same old good feeling: very solid at release and dead steady in the middle of the target. It will be for sure my next bow.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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I should probably start a new thread for this but why clutter up the board right?

Anyways I am about 99% sure that I am going to own a VE for indoors, haven't shot one yet but I am trying to find one that I can wing some arrows out of. This bow will be used mostly for if not completely for indoor (5-spot and vegas). I am thinking about getting 50-60 limbs but part of me thinks that it would be better with 40-50 limbs. Can anyone comment on that? Also I am not sure which limbs to get 2000, 3000, 3500; I am leaning 3500 being 6'4" the extra length does not worry me much, any suggestions/comments on that as well? Benifits/drawbacks?
 

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I should probably start a new thread for this but why clutter up the board right?

Anyways I am about 99% sure that I am going to own a VE for indoors, haven't shot one yet but I am trying to find one that I can wing some arrows out of. This bow will be used mostly for if not completely for indoor (5-spot and vegas). I am thinking about getting 50-60 limbs but part of me thinks that it would be better with 40-50 limbs. Can anyone comment on that? Also I am not sure which limbs to get 2000, 3000, 3500; I am leaning 3500 being 6'4" the extra length does not worry me much, any suggestions/comments on that as well? Benifits/drawbacks?
I see no reason that the standard 2000 Limbs would not work for you. Not even sure if they offer a longer limb config for that bow, since it is somewhat parralel limb design. I suggest sticking with the 50-60 lb limbs. The cams are not as harsh as everyone thinks.. I shot my spiral VE @ 60 lbs for everything.

-Adam
 

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I see no reason that the standard 2000 Limbs would not work for you. Not even sure if they offer a longer limb config for that bow, since it is somewhat parralel limb design. I suggest sticking with the 50-60 lb limbs. The cams are not as harsh as everyone thinks.. I shot my spiral VE @ 60 lbs for everything.

-Adam
Adam,

I see what you are saying, on the limbs I am looking at the added brace height and wondering if that would be worth the extra length? Also since it is going to be a spots killer is there any reason to have it set at 60lbs? I see alot of guys that are around that 55-60lbs range for indoors and I wonder if its really needed, and maybe it is to shoot those aluminum lincoln logs with 300 gr. in the front, maybe having it that high of a draw weight is needed i don't know. I just got into this spot killing game so I have a lot to learn yet, but I am hopelessly addicted, in fact I think my addiction to spot killing is worse that my addiction to coppenhagen was.
 

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Adam,

I see what you are saying, on the limbs I am looking at the added brace height and wondering if that would be worth the extra length? Also since it is going to be a spots killer is there any reason to have it set at 60lbs? I see alot of guys that are around that 55-60lbs range for indoors and I wonder if its really needed, and maybe it is to shoot those aluminum lincoln logs with 300 gr. in the front, maybe having it that high of a draw weight is needed i don't know. I just got into this spot killing game so I have a lot to learn yet, but I am hopelessly addicted, in fact I think my addiction to spot killing is worse that my addiction to coppenhagen was.
Here are my thoughts on draw weight....

Overall, it is going to boil down to HOLDING weight... Considering your height, you are likely 31" + on your DL. Remember that Holding weight is goign to offset MASS weight. This means that the more holding weight you have at full draw, the more mass weight you may be able to successfully stabilize at full draw. This means a more stable sight picture for you.

Now.. That being said, you may not want, or need a large amount of mass weight on the bow for it to be stable for you, which in turn means less of a requirement for holding weight.

Bottom line is that 50-60 lb limbs are going to allow you the ability to have a good range of holding weight at full draw which will likely cover what you need.

My VE required a lot more mass weight than my Mathews C4 did.. My C4 was right at 6.2 lbs, and my VE is over 7.5 lbs. I set the bow up based on the feedback it provided me while shooting over a period of time.. Added weight here & there. Moved it around, & tweaked it until the bow told me that was what it wanted with me behind it. ;)

After adding 1/4 ounce to my front stabilizer on Sunday, I shot a 6 arrow group at 100 yards that looked like I had done it with a rifle!! ha ha

Again, I cover all this good stuff on ArcheryLessonsOnline.com if you are interested. It'e more intersting with pics & vids too.. :)

-Adam
 

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Here are my thoughts on draw weight....

Overall, it is going to boil down to HOLDING weight... Considering your height, you are likely 31" + on your DL. Remember that Holding weight is goign to offset MASS weight. This means that the more holding weight you have at full draw, the more mass weight you may be able to successfully stabilize at full draw. This means a more stable sight picture for you.

Now.. That being said, you may not want, or need a large amount of mass weight on the bow for it to be stable for you, which in turn means less of a requirement for holding weight.

Bottom line is that 50-60 lb limbs are going to allow you the ability to have a good range of holding weight at full draw which will likely cover what you need.

My VE required a lot more mass weight than my Mathews C4 did.. My C4 was right at 6.2 lbs, and my VE is over 7.5 lbs. I set the bow up based on the feedback it provided me while shooting over a period of time.. Added weight here & there. Moved it around, & tweaked it until the bow told me that was what it wanted with me behind it. ;)

After adding 1/4 ounce to my front stabilizer on Sunday, I shot a 6 arrow group at 100 yards that looked like I had done it with a rifle!! ha ha

Again, I cover all this good stuff on ArcheryLessonsOnline.com if you are interested. It'e more intersting with pics & vids too.. :)

-Adam
Okay I see where you are going with that and it definately makes sense. I will keep that in mind when it comes time to order my new bow, it will be a while yet but its never to soon to start my research.
 

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I'm just getting into target archery, but I have found the same thing that "Scmelik" says to be true. There is a holding wt/bow wt combination that is stable and feels right for you. You have to build the system around you. If you aren't very strong, then a light bow with a low holding wt will probably be the best for you. If you are strong and shoot a lot then more holding wt and a heavier bow will be better.

If you separate the two, you will get an imbalance, such as low holding wt and heavy bow. Then you use your bow arm to support the wt and it's like holding a broom at arms length. You can do it, but it quickly becomes unsteady. By the same token, high holding wt and light bow is more sensitive to slight changes in the muscle tension needed to hold the bow at full draw, and more sensitive to the reaction of the bow on release.

I shoot a 38 Pro, and I've been learning back tension. I was shooting a higher holding wt, but still had too much wt in my stabilizer. Changed to a lighter one that balanced the system, and it got much steadier.

My friend just changed from PE to VE, and he loves the new bow and shoots very well (better) with it.
 
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