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Ready Aim Pluck
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Hello everyone!
I got off the phone with tech support at Carbon express today about a problem with the Nano SSTs I recently ordered. I ordered the 700 spine shafts which according to the charts say I need the #2 size 100-110gr points but the problem is that the front of the shaft has a bit of a lip as shown in the picture.
DSC_1993.jpg

Now the carbon express rep said that all her prostaff have been using some sandpaper to make sort of a bevel on the front of the shaft to get rid of the lip and I was wondering if some of the more arrow savvy people can weigh in on their thoughts about putting a bevel/sanding on a full carbon shaft? I've always been taught that once the original structure of the carbon has been compromised, the shaft isn't safe to shoot. However I'm concerned of the lip splintering if I don't do anything. What should I do?

Thanks in advance,
V
 

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I guess you could sand it down with a 800-1000 grit paper. IIRC old Beman all carbon shafts had similar instructions when using their in-out points...
 

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I'd generally say for target points you really shouldn't do that. Damage to the carbon is bad as you say. It is however at a point where there's steel reinforcing the whole shaft... If cx say do it, then you're probably ok but you wouldn't find me doing it.
 

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Williamsburg, VA.
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If you do bevel/taper the shaft, you may want to consider a thin 'wipe' of CA adhesive to help avert any fraying in the future...

r/
Dave
 

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I've been taking the "sharp edge" off my cut carbons all along I mean you've already cut the shaft, what harm can come of putting a very small radius to the sharp edge. You have to be careful though, like mentioned, I use about a 800 grit silicon carbide paper and put it on a hard surface like glass or metal so the paper lays flat. AND be careful you don't sand uphill, against the fiber direction. I do it while the shaft is still chucked in the lathe and spinning.

A thin wipe of CA glue on the radius may also be a good idea to consolidate the edge further.
 

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USAA Regional-L4 Coach
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better way to "bevel the edge" than across the grain of the shaft (shaft spinning) is to sand or cut only with the grain and towards the cut end, not towards the shaft. Very fine (800-1000 grit) paper and only slide the paper with the grain and in the direction towards the point.

If you used the MFG recommended method of cutting the shafts, you have already cut across the carbon fibers with a fine grit wheel, carbide or diamond saw at very speed. a gentle beveling of the end is not going to compromise the integrity of the shaft.

DC
 

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better way to "bevel the edge" than across the grain of the shaft (shaft spinning) is to sand or cut only with the grain and towards the cut end, not towards the shaft. Very fine (800-1000 grit) paper and only slide the paper with the grain and in the direction towards the point.

If you used the MFG recommended method of cutting the shafts, you have already cut across the carbon fibers with a fine grit wheel, carbide or diamond saw at very speed. a gentle beveling of the end is not going to compromise the integrity of the shaft.

DC
Yes true. My lathe is turning pretty slow about 300 rpm and the high speed Dremel is advanced toward the place to cut in the tool holder turret. That way the cut off wheel is actually making a scoring cut all the way around. I take a sanding block and move the block towards the end in one pass, lift the block and then come down to sand forward again to eliminate any cross grain sanding of the fibers.
 

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Genesis 21:20
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Don't worry about it. The bulge on the point is going to open a big enough hole that the shaft won't be an issue.
 

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sometimes reality hurts
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I dress the ends of my shafts before installing components, but it's way short of anything that would be considered a bevel - I'm talking taking a few thou off. I use a Lee case deburring tool. this variety takes a very fine cut so you can just dust a tiny amount off the end of the shaft:

http://madcommando.com/eStore/images/90109 Chamfer tool.JPG

I would not recommend this variety, it would cut far more material than desirable.

http://media.midwayusa.com/productimages/880x660/Primary/325/325963.jpg
 

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Easton Vectors used to have the same issue. I sanded them down with no probs. Some Easton Navigators had too big a lip when someone tried using ACE points, I saw few of them fraying and breaking from the tip.

I put very light bewel to all of my shafts, It's more just sanding down any edges that have formed while cutting, but in 45 degree angle that puts a bit of bewel in. I use diamond file for that.
 

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Does Top Hat make a point that is supposed to fit your arrow? I found that Top Hat points are much nicer fit/finish to the shaft.
 

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Caspian has the best solution....get a case deburring tool available at any reloading shop and it works very quickly and accurately. Don't fully deburr the edge, just cut the outside only just down to the thickness of the point. JIM
 

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Caspian has the best solution....get a case deburring tool available at any reloading shop and it works very quickly and accurately. Don't fully deburr the edge, just cut the outside only just down to the thickness of the point. JIM
To my mind, I rather have the cutting or abrading done parallel or with the grain / fibers. Seems anything that cuts across the grain or fibers will tend to dislodge or push the fibers to one side.
 

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sometimes reality hurts
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a sharp tool cuts the fibres fine, especially when removing minute amounts.

try sanding the end of an old shaft and see what happens. you'll get dust and a cut finish. if it was kevlar it would be different.
 

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Seems anything that cuts across the grain or fibers will tend to dislodge or push the fibers to one side.
Maybe, but back in 1987, I received my first Beman Diva all carbon shafts. No idea at first how to cut them. Been using pipe cutters for aluminums. Then I had a "brilliant" idea; Put the shaft into the chuck of a drilling machine, drill a hole on a piece of wood and put the shaft through it to stabilize the other end, mark the cutting point and use abrasive wire to cut tiles to eat through the shaft... Of course I had to sand down the shafts to exact length, but afterwards had no problems with points or shafts...
 

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a sharp tool cuts the fibres fine, especially when removing minute amounts.

try sanding the end of an old shaft and see what happens. you'll get dust and a cut finish. if it was kevlar it would be different.
Only true IF you typically sand back and forth on the cut end (going backward towards the cut end) then, of course you'll turn up fibers. I'm talking about sanding using a hard fixed shape abrasive of about a 1200 grit at a angle and ONE direction, from back to front of arrow.
 

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I think I would try a chamfering tool for ammo cases. They make an external and internal one. There pretty cheap. See if that works. It's a tool that puts a slight bevel on a shell casing for seating a bullet.
 
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