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Discussion Starter #1
I have always wondered if my draw board was holding my bow the same way that I do. I know if you apply a small amount of up or down pressure on the rope that holds bow back it does alter draw stop timing. So my solution to this was to use a laser level that projects both a vertical and horizontal line. I aligned vertical line on shaft and aligned horizontal line on axles. I thought this would relieve my doubts.
Ok. so after that I decided to have friend line laser up on arrow and axles while I had bow at full draw. To my surprise the bottom axle is about 1/2" forward of plum when I hold bow so that arrow is level. I now adjust drawboard to match that 1/2" out of plum. I saw your pics in another thread using plumbob thru axles. So my question is am i right to adjust out of plum to match my style? By the way it is a Hoyt vector turbo, 29 1/2" draw, 63#. Gold tip pro hunters. And it shoots great out to 50 yards. Not sure if I am worrying too much. I like things to be exact. Thanks for your input.
 

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The amount your bottom cam is ahead of "plumb" depends partly on how far out you are aiming...

Think about it...if you were going to aim at a target 300 yards away, you would be putting that lower cam WAY further ahead of "plumb" than 1/2". What if you were aiming downhill? Then the top cam is going to be ahead of "plumb".

I calibrate my draw board to my actual draw cycle at a distance of five feet...I record the cams with a video camera and then comapre that to what I see on the draw board and then adjust my pull rope on the draw board accordingly.
 

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On my draw board i made i used a 1 inch sold rode . It sit nice in the grip area the same ever time , and im not using a winch to draw the bow . In my set up i have to fixed points . For what i use it for it works good for me and does every thing i need but we all do things a little diff . Bottom line were all after the same thing a well tuned bow . Wasnt picking at u , was amazed that people worry about that is all . But there are things i worry more about and u would think thats a waste of time
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I had the arrow level according to laser.
The amount your bottom cam is ahead of "plumb" depends partly on how far out you are aiming...

Think about it...if you were going to aim at a target 300 yards away, you would be putting that lower cam WAY further ahead of "plumb" than 1/2". What if you were aiming downhill? Then the top cam is going to be ahead of "plumb".

I calibrate my draw board to my actual draw cycle at a distance of five feet...I record the cams with a video camera and then comapre that to what I see on the draw board and then adjust my pull rope on the draw board accordingly.
 

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This is just a question, but is a vector a symmetrical bow? is the nock point and arrow rest both in the middle of the bow? equidistant from both top and bottom axle? I know some bows an not symmetrical they move the grip closer to the middle and this raises the arrow rest above the middle of the bow and I would think the nocking point....
just a thought
 

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So with your arrow parallel to the ground (which we assume is perpendicular to gravity) your bottom cam was 1/2" ahead of the plump line (or lone of gravitational pull)?

In that case, set your draw board for that same scenario...how you do that is up to you (trying to visualize something in my head but it ain't working)

I had the arrow level according to laser.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The arrow rest is above center. You might be on to the reason . still have to think about that one.
This is just a question, but is a vector a symmetrical bow? is the nock point and arrow rest both in the middle of the bow? equidistant from both top and bottom axle? I know some bows an not symmetrical they move the grip closer to the middle and this raises the arrow rest above the middle of the bow and I would think the nocking point....
just a thought
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That is exactly what i did. Just looking for confirmation that is the best thing to do. I also help a few friends with their bows and I guess I will check each with laser level and adjust accordingly.
So with your arrow parallel to the ground (which we assume is perpendicular to gravity) your bottom cam was 1/2" ahead of the plump line (or lone of gravitational pull)?

In that case, set your draw board for that same scenario...how you do that is up to you (trying to visualize something in my head but it ain't working)
 

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With a Hoyt the nocking point is above center along with the rest. The grip throat is the vertical center.

One other point is that changing pressure against the grip and/or moving the nocking point up or down will change cam synch (this is true for ANY dual or hybrid cam bow). So the drawboard is only good for getting just so close. You need to "creep tune" to get the cams synched perfectly for you and your particular setup. You'll be glad you did, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Buster. I will do that this weekend!
 

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With a Hoyt the nocking point is above center along with the rest. The grip throat is the vertical center.

One other point is that changing pressure against the grip and/or moving the nocking point up or down will change cam synch (this is true for ANY dual or hybrid cam bow). So the drawboard is only good for getting just so close. You need to "creep tune" to get the cams synched perfectly for you and your particular setup. You'll be glad you did, too.
Exactly!

No drawboard will hold the bow the same way you do. Neither will any of the supertuners. Yeah, they get you close, but ultimately it's up to you.

Best of luck.
 
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