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When using proper BT does your bow arm scapula/rhomboids need to be contracted and pulled toward your spine. Like your drawing arm.
 

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bttsj1 -

You might want to try upstairs in the FITA section for a more detailed answer. I stopped teaching bt decades ago. If you start worrying about which muscle does what, you're IMHO, missing the boat. Most people don't think/work that way. If your string hand comes back cleanly and your bowarm remains still (ie folow-through is correct), you've already got the bt working. Interestingly, the target guys I teach seem to do pretty well that way.

Techincal answer ;), only so much as to keep the bow from hitting you in the face. If both sides pull equally, then the bow will fly to the left (for a right handed shooter) on release. The string side muscles need to take a greater load than the bow side, and should (IMHO) be thought of as more of an alignment issue than a muscle one.

Viper1 out.
 

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Second that

I'll second what Viper said about pulling left when using BT equally on both sides. I actually think it's a little better and providing some minute tension on the bow arm toward the target. You don't want to over do this, or else you are placing torque. As far as back tension I apply it on the pre draw, and then i don't focus on it. All of my focus is on the target throughout the draw and fire sequence.
 

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Just my opinion, fwiw......back tension is one of those things you should be doing and should not be thinking about.....
 

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Just my opinion, fwiw......back tension is one of those things you should be doing and should not be thinking about.....
It seems that "should" probably also means that many of us don't. So, for those of us who are not, how do we fix that without thinking about it? Is there a method that gets one to use the muscles right without the need for "visualization" and such?
 

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Warbow -

With new guys, once a solid anchor is achieved and repeatable, I start making sure that the drawing hand comes straight back during and after the release (full pull-through). Even if it's synthetic at first, once it becomes "natural", I know the guy is using back tension, even if he doesn't (know it). Much better to "visualize" the follow-through that which muscle is doing what.

Viper1 out.
 

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thanks

I was just going to post up the same question. What I'm doing right now is when I get almost to full draw I can get my back muscles to finish to full draw. Once I get those muscles taking the tension I just concentrate on pulling staight back and finishing with my release hand as close to my shoulder as I can. It seems to working pretty well.
 

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I find it helpful to realize that the final portion of the draw is not so much as pulling motion as a rotational one. The string arm, and it is helpful to consider especially the elbow, is rotating around the spine. You might find it helpful to focus your mind on your shoulder blade (scapula) and the muscles that move it toward the spine while you are learning the process. And you may find it helpful to draw below your anchor and then rise up to it.

But ultimately, as Viper says, the proof is in the follow through. If the string hand moves straight back, the elbow moves back and around, and the string hand ends up behind your neck and limp, you must have done something right. Ultimately it is the result of your motions that matter, not the process. And if the result of them is correct....where did the arrow go? Where do you think? - lbg
 
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