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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Disclaimer:

I know this doesn't apply to everyone. I'm posting this information for those that are in the same boat as me.

Information:

I live in MD, not far from Baltimore. There are very few hills/mountains in this area. Therefore, most of the areas I hunt are flat. The calculations I've pasted below apply to a flat hunting area, and I used simple right triangle geometry!!!

I checked 3 different (typical) treestand heights (see legend). Note that the treestand heights are feet and the distances are in yards. The data plotted below is the difference between a treestand height shot and a ground level shot. You'll note that the differences are minimal (especially for shots > 20 yards).

Picture1.gif

Therefore, I contend that, if you aren't super high in the tree and the target isn't super close to your tree, angle compensation isn't necessary in a range finder for bow hunters that hunt on flat (or relatively flat) areas.

The reason I bothered with this is because I wanted to know if it was worth spending the extra money to get a range finder equipped with angle compensation. Based on this analysis and my hunting area I have decided that it isn't necessary for me. Also, the range finder (with angle comp.) that I was interested in has a max range of 100 yards. This isn't really sufficient for longer range rifle shots. So, I'm looking for an affordable range finder that will range from 20 yards or less out to 300+ yards. Let me know if you have any suggestions. I would like to stay at or below $200 and prefer a model that Bass Pro carries since its only 15 mins from my house.

Long winded, late night, ATer's - enjoy!!! :darkbeer:
 

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I found the feature to be more of a pain. Plus I have never been more than an inchor so high or low when shooting 3-d targets out ot 40yrds with my slow bows.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I found the feature to be more of a pain. Plus I have never been more than an inchor so high or low when shooting 3-d targets out ot 40yrds with my slow bows.
Cool. Thanks for the comment. I was hoping that people would agree based on my "flat" hunting area and the minimal amount of ranging error. With my bow, a 2 yard error in range doesn't make much of a difference.
 

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I try to hunt with a bow fast enough that I can use a single pin and hit the sweet spot inside of 40 without adjusting my pin. I personally have never used mine before a shot but almost always after.
 

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Cosine Angle

For shot to 40 yds from the heights you show on your chart your line of sight and actual shooting distance will only be a couple of yds different, well within the kill zone of a white tail.

Practise from a raised height in the off season and you'll see just how much difference.

The good range finders will let you put in the arrow FPS to get your shootig distance even closer for the angle, but they cost more then $200
 

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Discussion Starter #6
For shot to 40 yds from the heights you show on your chart your line of sight and actual shooting distance will only be a couple of yds different, well within the kill zone of a white tail.

Practise from a raised height in the off season and you'll see just how much difference.

The good range finders will let you put in the arrow FPS to get your shootig distance even closer for the angle, but they cost more then $200
thanks for the info., but i don't want to spend more than $200. i just want to have a better yardage estimate than my eyes and brain alone can provide.
 

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Ad Meliora
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Clever advertising meets facts...and once again, facts prevail. You've put on paper what many of us have figured out with our regular rangefinders...no need for angle compensation in many typical eastern US hunting situations.
 

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I plan on buying the Nikon 550 rifle hunter, mainly because I hunt the West for Elk (and Rams someday) in steep country. As someone who shoots field archery, understanding yardage cuts are an important part of the game. Even though in most cases cutting yardage isn't necessary when hunting (except where range and angles increase such as out west), I'd rather have the info and choose to ignore it, than need it and not have it.
Plus it doesn't seem to add much to the cost. The ONLY reason I wouldn't buy one would be because the angle feature make the unit cumbersome to use. The Nikon seem pretty straightforward though.
 

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BIRD HUNTER
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Last year I bought the 440 thinking I would never need the angle. Then The first deer I ranged had me wondering . ranged 92 yard on the 440. Now I have the rifle hunter. here a photo of that deer


 

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Aim Small, Miss Small
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As far as rangefinder suggestions go, I dont have much of an unbiased opinion since I have only ever owned one, but I have never had any trouble with my Bushnell Yardage Pro Scout...I have also heard good things about the Nikon ProStaff 550s, which are also under $200.
 

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Catch us if you can!
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Bushnell 450 - $150 tops, this is the yardage pro scout
 

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Aim Small, Miss Small
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Correct me if Im wrong, but I dont think the bushnell 450 is the same as the scout...The left one is the scout, the right is the 450...
 

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BIRD HUNTER
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if your Just going to treestand hunt in th east ,I dont think you need the arc. It only make a yard to 1 1/2 differnts in a 20 " tree stand.But if you go out west its nice to have,as you can see from my deer photo. That was steep angle and if it was 80 yards I may have taken a shot.This year if I go back I will range the same spot. Just so I know for sure.
 
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