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What do you add to the real DL number to come up with the manufacturer DL? I made a draw board, with no scale. I'm just measuring from the hook to the inside of the grip. I know I'm to take that number that I get from the draw board and add another number to that, but I don't remember what that is. Also is this number different form one bow to the next?
 
G

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the bows made today are allready measured at AMO spects. if you want to find how well they measured it you will need to find the true draw and then add 1.75" to that. True draw is measured from the throat of the grip to lowest point of the draw cycle.

Sean
 

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Dl

the bows made today are allready measured at AMO spects. if you want to find how well they measured it you will need to find the true draw and then add 1.75" to that. True draw is measured from the throat of the grip to lowest point of the draw cycle.

Sean
True draw - so this doesn't necessarily mean with the string all the way back to the hard stops? Can you explain the lowest point in the draw cycle?
 

· (aka lug nut)
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True draw - so this doesn't necessarily mean with the string all the way back to the hard stops? Can you explain the lowest point in the draw cycle?
Measure to the point where the hard stops will not allow you to draw back any further.

Use a tape measure from the deepest part of the curve on the grip
to
the spot where the nock groove touches the bowstring.

Write down this measurement.

Add 1.75-inches to the number on the piece of paper.
 

· (aka lug nut)
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Some folks,
like to "shoot"
from the "valley".

The "valley" of the draw cycle,
is where the draw weight goes to the lowest level
in the draw cycle.


Let's say you have a 60 lb bow.
Let's say you have a 80% letoff cam.

So,
this would mean the holding weight should be 12 lbs.

Usually,
this means to adjust the cam starting position,
so that you HOLD 12 lbs, when you reach the END of the draw cycle,
where the hard stops do not allow the cam to rotate any further.


Some folks,
like to shoot at the bottom of the valley,
which means you will FEEL the draw weight start to drop
less and less
during the back half of the draw cycle.


Maybe about 85% through the draw cycle,
the weight you FEEL reaches the MINIMUM weight.

Now, you continue to pull back the string,
and get to 90% of the draw cycle,
and you FEEL the weight start to increase a tiny bit.

Now, you continue to pull back the string to 100% of the draw cycle,
and you FEEL the draw stops prevent you from pulling back any further.
 

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yes thats corect 1.75'' it sounds like ur all set alan
 

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1.75"...............however the bowtechs that I have measured dont add up.
 
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True draw - so this doesn't necessarily mean with the string all the way back to the hard stops? Can you explain the lowest point in the draw cycle?

if your bow is set up correctly the lowest holding weight and draw stops of todays bows will be the same. Years ago many used round wheels but pulled into the stops alittle this helped with backtension. Bows today don't allow for this extra pull due to the flat back cams which will go from the lowest valley point directly onto the limbs. Either way just add 1.75" to the distance you draw the bow measured from the grip to the string at full draw
 

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1.75"...............however the bowtechs that I have measured dont add up.
From my experience with several different bow brands, Bowtech is the worst for dl. I had one that was 5/8" too long and the rest were all 3/4" to long. Thats alot.

Having said that, I haven't owned one bow that was spot on in dl measurement.

My dl is 29.5. I used to shoot 29" draw with a short loop and would twist my string to down to get to 29" amo. Recently, I just started buying bows in 28.5" to save the time.
 

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If my physical draw length is 28 3/4", should I subtract the 3/4" for the nock loop in order to determine the AMO draw length of 28".
I realize this is only a starting point since bow companies are not all following their AMO draw length definition ("the distance at full draw from the nocking point to the pivot point of the grip plus 1 3/4 inches).
 

· (aka lug nut)
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If my physical draw length is 28 3/4", should I subtract the 3/4" for the nock loop in order to determine the AMO draw length of 28".
I realize this is only a starting point since bow companies are not all following their AMO draw length definition ("the distance at full draw from the nocking point to the pivot point of the grip plus 1 3/4 inches).

No.


Bows do not come tuned from the factory.

If a bow has a sticker that says 28.0-inch AMO DL,
then this means when you have the bow at full draw...

this measurement should read 26.25-inches.



Distance from the deepest part of the curve on the grip
to the center serving should read 26.25-inches with a tape measure.


If the tape measure reads MORE than 26.25-inches...

say, the tape measure reads 1/4-inch too much
say, the tape measure reads 1/2-inch too much....


a) check that ATA (axle to axle length) is correct.
b) check that the brace height measurement is correct.

IF the ATA measurement is correct
and the brace height measurement is correct....

then, the bowstring is too long,
and you or your pro shop needs to add twists to shorten the bowstring.


So,
back to your question about the d-loop.


Yes,
the d-loop size affects how the bow will FIT YOU.

No,
the d-loop length is not part of the AMO DL of the bow.

YES,
you do need to select a AMO DL for a bow SHORT ENOUGH,
to allow room for the d-loop.
 

· (aka lug nut)
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So why is the answer to my question "No"?

To fit me = my physical draw length: 28 3/4"

Nock Loop = 3/4"

AMO draw length = short enough to include loop: 28"
Depends how you want to use the terminology.

The d-loop length affects the shooter's anchor point.

So,
when you say the "shooter's draw length"...

usually, that means what Bow DL fits the shooter.

So,
let's say you really fit a 28.0-inch dl Bow.
Then,
the shooter draw length would also be 28.0 inches.

The bow dl really just sets the position of the NOCK on your face.

So,
if you like a 1/2-inch D-Loop,
this only affects where the release lands on your face.

A 1/2-inch d-loop might work really well with your wrist strap release.


Well,
let's say you switch to a T-Handle release.

You still want the nock to be on the same spot on your face.

Maybe the T-Handle release works best with a 3/4-inch long d-loop.


The handle length (neck length)
AND
the d-loop length both work together
to position your RELEASE HAND on your face.


The position of your RELEASE HAND on your face
depends on the size of the release and the d-loop.

So,
when you say the shooter's DRAW LENGTH,
you really mean where the nock lands on your face.



So,
pick a bow DL setting that puts the nock directly under your eyeball.




Adjust the d-loop to fine tune where your hand lands on your face.

Longer release neck length?
Shorten d-loop so the release hand lands on the same spot on your face.


Switch to a shorter release neck length?
Lengthen d-loop so the release hand lands on the same spot on your face.


Using a wrist strap release?
Adjust the strap to trigger length
AND
adjust the d-loop length,
so the release hand lands on the same spot on your face.


Switching back and forth between different size handle releases...

you still want the nock to be directly under the eyeball.



Another way to put this...
the bow DL setting only affects the front or target half of your body...

bow arm,
bow arm elbow bend
where the nock lands on your face (hopefully under the eyeball)


You like LOTS of bend on the bow arm elbow?
Choose a shorter DL setting for the bow.

You shoot with a target shooters, straighter bow arm elbow?
Choose a slightly longer DL setting on the bow,
so you can get the nock under the eyeball.


The d-loop
and the length of your release handle neck length...

only affects the rear half of the shooter
(release arm half of the body).
 
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