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I've recently been messing around with a compound, and find using backtention seems easier. But I go back to using my recurve and copy the back movement and it seems fine. But my point is I have to concepts of backtention
1. moving back muscles by shoulder blades togather, like a circle until release goes off or clicker goes off. My coaches describe as a circular motion which should "explode" and send arms out
2. moving the back by shoulder blade inward towards the center of your back while pushing out with your bow arm (this one I notice to be common among friends of mine who shoot compound)

My coach tells me to make my mind up on how to do my form as in consistant everytime and was wondering what to do love to hear from anything on what to do with backtention on a recurve.
 

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I've recently been messing around with a compound, and find using backtention seems easier. But I go back to using my recurve and copy the back movement and it seems fine. But my point is I have to concepts of backtention
1. moving back muscles by shoulder blades togather, like a circle until release goes off or clicker goes off. My coaches describe as a circular motion which should "explode" and send arms out
2. moving the back by shoulder blade inward towards the center of your back while pushing out with your bow arm (this one I notice to be common among friends of mine who shoot compound)

My coach tells me to make my mind up on how to do my form as in consistant everytime and was wondering what to do love to hear from anything on what to do with backtention on a recurve.
My experience is that you need to engage the appropriate muscles in your back earlier with a recurve than a compound. I like to engage them and get them involved at the set or earliest part of the shot.

check stance/set body
set front arm
check hand
check string fingers (visually)
look at target
apply some pressure to the string *engage back muscles now and start thinking about rotation*
blah blah blah, rest of shot


is how I try to do my recurve checklist. I put it later in the list with a compound, after I'm at full draw.

The coaching cue I use is to think about the rotation of the LAN2 area (tricep area) through the entire shot in the recurve.
 

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I've recently been messing around with a compound, and find using backtention seems easier. But I go back to using my recurve and copy the back movement and it seems fine. But my point is I have to concepts of backtention
1. moving back muscles by shoulder blades togather, like a circle until release goes off or clicker goes off. My coaches describe as a circular motion which should "explode" and send arms out
2. moving the back by shoulder blade inward towards the center of your back while pushing out with your bow arm (this one I notice to be common among friends of mine who shoot compound)

My coach tells me to make my mind up on how to do my form as in consistant everytime and was wondering what to do love to hear from anything on what to do with backtention on a recurve.
I have spent a great deal of time after reading Total Archery to get comfortable executing the expansion by method 1 you describe.
I found that for me there is nothing consistent about that method.
For me it is a uncomfortable, unnatural method of pulling through the clicker and staying on target. Method 2. Is a much more comfortable, natural way for me to expand through the clicker. Take a look at "The Simple Art of Winning" section on this topic, for that matter just about all others.
Method 2. if done correctly will aslo produce an expansion of teh chest.
I seem to rcall that the pulling shoulder blades together has been recounted by the author.
 

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I seem to rcall that the pulling shoulder blades together has been recounted by the author.
Correct. While the mechanics of terminology is probably OK, the image it invokes seems to create other problems.

The "thought" of pulling the shoulder blades together seems to invoke a "pulling" of the bow arm towards your back and will not keep the shot clean.

The thought of moving the LAN 2 straight back (not away from the target but at 90 degrees from the target or down the shooting line behind you) seems to create the better image. This creates the back tension and still allows you to "reach" for the target with the bow. This image also seems to help with proper rotation around the back shoulder and engages the proper muscles.
 

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Correct. While the mechanics of terminology is probably OK, the image it invokes seems to create other problems.

The "thought" of pulling the shoulder blades together seems to invoke a "pulling" of the bow arm towards your back and will not keep the shot clean.

The thought of moving the LAN 2 straight back (not away from the target but at 90 degrees from the target or down the shooting line behind you) seems to create the better image. This creates the back tension and still allows you to "reach" for the target with the bow. This image also seems to help with proper rotation around the back shoulder and engages the proper muscles.


Thanks foor the clarification.

I have also spent some time with the LAN 2 thing and have concluded that LAN 2 is analogies to putting a rubber band around your wrist so that you remember to do something else; rotating an imaginary body part to achieve tension in the back muscles.
I realize this reminder method works for some, but why not focus on what is trying to be accomplished by focusing attention on the target area. All this reminding doesn’t seem to fit well with a biometrically efficient discussion.
 
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