Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
always wanted to learn how to shoot a recurve, but Im not sure what I need to start out with. Im 6'3" tall so Im not sure what size bow I would need and what poundage to start out with ,so if someone could give me some info I would love to start looking for a bow to shoot. Thx for all the help!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,677 Posts
I would recommend a bow that is 64" or longer - 62" would work - but the longer the better. I would consider ILF. You can get a Tradtech Pinnacle Riser for $249.00 and a set of Tradtech BlackMax limbs for $129.00 - a great deal and a great bow.

If you have the time and can afford it - I would highly recommend Rick Welch's shooting clinic it is $500.00 and it is one on one for a weekend with him. If you cannot do that - get his DVD's Instructional Shooting Volume II and/or The Accuracy Factory - all of this is available at www.dakotabows.com.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,572 Posts
Chris -

See if this helps:

First Traditional Bow and Accessories - suggestions
Revised 4/4/11

Bow –
Recurve or longbow? While certainly a personal preference, the grip, physical weight and balance of a modern recurve will typically lessen the learning curve over most longbows. However, whatever bow you chose must appeal to you on some gut level. If you’re not happy with it, you’re not going to want to shoot it!

These days, I’m hard pressed to recommend anything other than an ILF rig for a new shooter. The functionality, versatility and tuneability can not be matched with any one piece or simple takedown bow. Most adult males interested in traditional archery should start in the 30 - 35# range AT THEIR DRAW LENGTH. The bow must be light enough so that the draw weight doesn’t factor into the shot sequence.

Risers –
The 23” Hoyt Excel ILF riser is an excellent choice for archers preferring a longer bow in the 64” – 68” range, The 21” Excel a better cruiser length bow and can be equally at home on target range or in the hunting field, lengths are between 62” and 66”.
Any of the longer risers are more suited for dedicated target rigs.

Chris, in your case, think LONGER for a first bow, 66" would be a minimum and 70" for a training bow wouldn't be out of the question. If you plan on hunting, you can go shorter later on.


Limbs –
The Samick Privilege and Sebastian Flute Axiom limbs are inexpensive and excellent
shooting limbs. Stick to wood core limbs with fiberglass or carbon surfaces, as carbon
core limbs provide no advantage to beginner or intermediate shooters. The older KAP TRex limbs are also good, but were discontinued a while back. Hoyt limbs are good
shooters, but tend to be pricier, without any added benefit.

Lancaster Archery Supply (LAS) / Trad Tech Archery (TT) is selling Samick limbs with a matte black finish, that are quite reasonable in price and possibly more aesthetically
pleasing to potential traditional bow hunters. Performance is similar to the standard
Samick target limbs, but they are available in higher draw weights.

Limb length (short, medium or long) depends on draw length. Most people with or near a 28” draw should opt for a 62- 64” or longer bow for the first time out. Most ILF limbs will gain or lose 1# per inch of riser length. For example, a 40# pair of
limbs rated on a 23” riser will actually weigh 42# on a 21” riser and 38# on a 25” riser
The Black Max limbs have been weighed / rated on a LAS/TT 17” riser and not the more standard 23” and 25” risers. Due to the difference in the angle the limbs attach to the riser, the limbs will weigh approximately the same on a 21” riser as they do on a LAS/TT 17” riser. (Yes, it can get confusing. If you have doubts about the weight, call the vendor and have them weigh the combination YOU ARE BUYING before they send it out.) You should be able to find an Excel riser and appropriate starter limbs in the $250 – 300 range with a little shopping around.

The above bows are called “take down” bows meaning they come apart into a riser
section and a pair of limbs. Other than the obvious advantage in transport, this design
allows you to buy extra limbs when you decide you want more weight or change length, without having to buy a whole new bow.

Vintage bows –
Another option for new traditional archers is a vintage bow. Bows made in the late 1960’s through the early to mid 1970’s are available from some dealers, eBay and even
(sometimes) garage sales. The same criteria applies: keep the weight in the mid 30#
First Traditional Bow and Accessories- suggestions range, the length over 62” and the price as low as possible! If possible, examine the bow for cracks or glue line separations before buying.

Strings –
For modern ILF bows, a 14 strand D97 string of the appropriate length will handle any weight from 20# - 50# and provide perfect nock fit when used with a .020” serving and small groove “G” nocks (see below). For vintage bows, only use DACRON strings, typically a 12 strand string will be appropriate for bows in the recommended weight range. Having a spare string is also a good idea.

Bow stringers –
Bateman or Cartel bow stringers. Yes, you need one! Please do not string any bow by hand with the “step- through” or “push-pull” methods – for your safety and that of the bow!

Rests –
For modern bows with plunger holes – NAP Centershot Flipper or a rest/plunger combination.

For vintage bows – Bear Weather rest or similar. Most vintage bows will allow you to shoot off the shelf, but for a new shooter, it adds an unnecessary complication.

Stabilizer –
Not really necessary on a traditional bow, but I’ve been using them so long most recurves just don’t feel right without them. A short, 4” – 6” hunting stabilizer can be bought or made.

Bow cases –
Several hard cases are available from Neet, Cartel, and a number of others for take down bows. One piece bows can be carried in hard or soft cases.

Arrows –
Start with aluminum arrows. Even the Easton Blues are acceptable, if you can deal with blue arrows. Any xx75 grade aluminum shaft is fine. Typically traditional shooters use screw in points of 100 – 125 grains on aluminum arrows.

Quiver –
Personal choice. Almost any side, hip or back quiver will work. Consider one with an accessory pocket to carry things like extra nocks, strings etc…

Tabs (finger protection) –
For target oriented shooters – Cavalier/AAE. The tab size is based on the width, not the length.

For bow hunting archers – SAM (Super Archery Mitt) currently sold by Martin archery. It has an unusual design, but is the most (finger) protective one out there.

There are a number of other tabs on the market, from Saunders, Neet, etc., and most are usable for new shooters; avoid tabs with “hair” layers. Their durability isn’t great.

I would avoid “gloves” for new shooters. While they seem simpler, they can make the release trickier and finding the right size may be problematic. For more experienced shooters, it becomes a matter of preference.

Arm guard – Any one you like, just keep it simple! (Yes, you’ll need one.)

Accessories –
Nocking points, bow squares, etc. can be fabricated from some household items or borrowed from the local range or club.


Other than that, a decent coach or instructor who can work with you over time will be your greatest bang for the buck.

Viper1 out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
68-70" would be even better, less than 30lbs draw at 28".
Why make learning something new any harder then it has to be?

-Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
If you're using a longbow I would have to agree with the longer bow or if you are shooting targets. If you plan on hunting with it I would go with a shorter faster bow that wouldn't be so cubersome in the woods. Since you are just getting started I would try to stay around 50# bow. You could go to an archery shop and try a few out of different draw weights and see what you are comfortable pulling without having to man handle it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
If you're using a longbow I would have to agree with the longer bow or if you are shooting targets. If you plan on hunting with it I would go with a shorter faster bow that wouldn't be so cubersome in the woods. Since you are just getting started I would try to stay around 50# bow. You could go to an archery shop and try a few out of different draw weights and see what you are comfortable pulling without having to man handle it.
This is pretty questionable advice for someone just starting out. Telling a tall guy to get a shorter bow of 50# has the potential to set him back a long ways.

-Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Well everyone is entitled to thier own opinion Grant. He could get a really long bow that he will be beating up in the woods or unable to shoot out of a ground blind. Or he could get a 35# bow that isn't legal to hunt with in most states. As stated he should go to a bow shop and find one that is comfortable that doesn't have to be man handled, meaning comfortable to draw and hold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
Well everyone is entitled to thier own opinion Grant. He could get a really long bow that he will be beating up in the woods or unable to shoot out of a ground blind. Or he could get a 35# bow that isn't legal to hunt with in most states. As stated he should go to a bow shop and find one that is comfortable that doesn't have to be man handled, meaning comfortable to draw and hold.
Who said anything about hunting? It sure wasn't the OP.
He stated that he wanted to learn how to shoot a recurve. That implies that he wants to learn how to do it well, which is not something he's going to learn with a short heavy bow.

-Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,114 Posts
Short, hunting weight bows are useless to learn on, much less for someone 6'3". Master the 68"-70", 30# bow first and THEN see what might fit you if a shorter and heavier bow is required. Hint: if you ever have to "fit to the bow" instead of the bow "fitting to you", things will always be suboptimal in the shooting department. Like trying to run a marathon on shoes 2 sizes too small. Works for a short while but a short while only.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
You guys must need to do some pushups or something. 50# is not alot of bow to handle. I shoot a 67# hunting bow and 55# for targets with no problem at all and I'm 6'1" and only medium build. Like I said, everyone has their own opinion on what works. I normally don't get on these forums for just this reason, most people think that their opinion is the only one that matters. When I want to find something out I want ALL opinions, not just one. You guys enjoy!

ArcherChris3 Good luck!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,114 Posts
Savage, it's not about strength, but that is a common misconception in Trad shooting. Using a much lighter bow than you can manhandle is just plain smart for learning and for competing. There's nothing to gain from shooting a 50 - 55# bow unless you need it to hunt. We can all pull em back, we just know working easier is smarter for other venues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
I understand that Sanford but you must also understand that not everyone is the same either. What may be comfortable to some may not be to others. You can't just throw out a standard 30# to everyone you talk to. I think he would be better served to try out a few and see what he is comfortable with. We also need to see what his intended use is for the bow. Some people cannot afford to buy 2 bows or different sets of limbs. Being 6'3" tall I am going to assume that he is a grown man. Even a bow in the 40's would most likely be fine and if it were his intention to hunt, he would be able to without having to purchase another bow or limbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
Its a question of developing technique, if the bow causes any fatigue before you've shot 100-200 shots in a session then its too heavy for learning. Archery uses muscles in ways that no other activity does.
What do you think builds more muscles:
<50 arrows a day from a heavy bow or >100 arrows a day from a light one.
When you learn something you need to do it a lot, you just can't do a heavy bow lots.

I shoot a 32# bow almost daily, my average session is 100-200 arrows. Sometimes more, rarely less. I can shoot everything up to my 75# longbow with the exact same form, just less arrows. There is no disadvantage to a lighter bow, not in building form or strength.

-Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,114 Posts
Savage, it does depend on what the purpose is. If someone is stating they are starting out, regardless of their physical stature, they need a very low weight bow. 30# ain't even low for that purpose. There are muscles that need to be developed that have nothing to do with the heavy pulling. It takes fine motor control to shoot consistently accurate and a low weight bow is how you work some of the lesser muscles needed to maintain good form for when the heavier pulling is in place. I can easily manhandle 55# bows and have a few. I target shoot at 38#. My practice limbs are 26#. You do hit on a good point. It's more than a one bow (limbs) venture unless you just want to shoot arrows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
If your going to hunt then the cost of another set of limbs is a drop in the bucket. A set for a Sage is what, $70? You can get ILF limbs for $90.

Lighter limbs give you a lot more feedback on your form. The loose becomes more critical and its a lot easy to see if you are actually using backtension.

-Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,882 Posts
Spend your first $20 on a book called Shooting the Stickbow. Follow the guideline setup in there and you'll be on the right track and save yourself time, money and frustration. Good luck with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,047 Posts
You guys must need to do some pushups or something. 50# is not alot of bow to handle. I shoot a 67# hunting bow and 55# for targets with no problem at all and I'm 6'1" and only medium build. Like I said, everyone has their own opinion on what works. I normally don't get on these forums for just this reason, most people think that their opinion is the only one that matters. When I want to find something out I want ALL opinions, not just one. You guys enjoy!

ArcherChris3 Good luck!!!
My buddy came back from Marine bootcamp and was up shooting bows one day. He'd been really into working out and getting stronger and after coming back from bootcamp commented on how much fun it was, yes- he's a bit crazy! He's 5' 9" and 180 lbs, and after shooting a variety of bows I had he ordered a 40#'er, even though he could pull back the 76# monster I have hanging on the rack.

I personally like bows in the 65-70# range for everything from hunting to 3D and target shooting, but I've seen lots of 40-45# bows that could shoot like demons to know that they shouldn't be so easily dismissed either. Light and comfortable but with plenty of power with the right arrow...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Savage wrote:
"What do you think builds more muscles:
"<50 arrows a day from a heavy bow or >100 arrows a day from a light one."

50 arrows from a heavy bow builds more muscle, pure and simple.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top