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Discussion Starter #1
I have always read a bow performs better maxed out for the rating on the limbs poundage (70 pound limbs maxed out at 70; limb bolts turned all the way down)

I have a 70 pound Hoyt Nitrum 34 that I want to turn down to 65-66 pounds. Will the bow perform Ok with the limb bolts turned out a turn or two?

Also.... I think I have seen shims that you can put back in the gap that is created by turning the limbs bolts out.... that way you can tighten the limbs back against the shim. Do they exist and are they effective?
 

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Yes it's ok to do that, don't know about the shims never shimmed any my bows.
 

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It will probably perform a lot better backed off, if it's more comfortable for you to shoot. I've never seen any real evidence that bows work better maxed out. I wouldn't worry about the gap created but you may want to mark the bolts with a silver sharpy because sometimes the bolts will back out slightly from the vibration of shooting and that could screw up your tune.
 

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Yes you can turn them out, thats why they are there, mark the bolts with a pencil so you can keep the limbs even. (some people use paint so they can tell if they back out on their own)
The shims go between the limbs and the cams and are used for horizontal tuning, not required for limb bolts.
2 furs should get you in the ball park on that most excellent Nitrum! Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes you can turn them out, thats why they are there, mark the bolts with a pencil so you can keep the limbs even. (some people use paint so they can tell if they back out on their own)
The shims go between the limbs and the cams and are used for horizontal tuning, not required for limb bolts.
2 furs should get you in the ball park on that most excellent Nitrum! Good luck!
Right... I am not talking about cam shims.
I am referring to a possible shim to go in the gap of the limb and riser... so you could turn the limb bolts back down and it would create a tight fit.
 

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Just check the your bow to know how far you can back them off,
most bows are 8 some are more. Research it and find out before you back them out more than 6 or so.
 

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One turn out of each limb bolt should get you in the ballpark. I recently backed my bow back from 60 to 55 and it shoots just fine.
 

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I have always read a bow performs better maxed out for the rating on the limbs poundage (70 pound limbs maxed out at 70; limb bolts turned all the way down)

I have a 70 pound Hoyt Nitrum 34 that I want to turn down to 65-66 pounds. Will the bow perform Ok with the limb bolts turned out a turn or two?

Also.... I think I have seen shims that you can put back in the gap that is created by turning the limbs bolts out.... that way you can tighten the limbs back against the shim. Do they exist and are they effective?
I think you already know the answer. You have been around this site for a very long time and I am sure you have read other threads on this subject. No you don't need to fill the gap, it would do nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I was thinking maybe filling the gap would make the bow limb position more solid and eliminate a possible tendency of moving.
 

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I was thinking maybe filling the gap would make the bow limb position more solid and eliminate a possible tendency of moving.
You're worrying about nothing!
 

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<------Reese
Reckoning, GEN7X, Fast Eddie XL, Easton 6.5 Matrix, DCA IconX 625
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I have 2 E35's. Mine is backed out 1 turn and my son's is backed out 3 turns. No performance issues.

Regarding Elite - they recommend only 2 turns. However, 3 seems fine on my son's E35. It went from 51# maxed to 41#.
 

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Yes technically the bow is “better” turned up than turned down. But 4-5 lbs is fine. The bow will only shoot as good as you shot the bow though. Ofcourse assuming it is tuned correctly.
However that being said if you buy a 60-70 lbs bow and shot it at 60 your wasting your time IMO. Just buy the 50-60 or 40-50 or whatever it is and keep the limbs more flexed. Same thing goes with DL. Which is why I think I’m gonna switch over to hoyt from Mathews because they offer different cams for which DL you are.
 

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Use the limb bolts thats what they are for.
 

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Shootin and Cussin
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I have always read a bow performs better maxed out for the rating on the limbs poundage (70 pound limbs maxed out at 70; limb bolts turned all the way down)

I have a 70 pound Hoyt Nitrum 34 that I want to turn down to 65-66 pounds. Will the bow perform Ok with the limb bolts turned out a turn or two?

Also.... I think I have seen shims that you can put back in the gap that is created by turning the limbs bolts out.... that way you can tighten the limbs back against the shim. Do they exist and are they effective?
This was VERY true in the "old days" of the late 80s, early 90s. At present it just is not true any longer. At least on the majority of bows.
 

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I was just watching a video by Gillingham (at the ATA show) talking about tuning his new Bowtech. One thing he said that king of surprised me was: the most important thing about a bow is it's limb pockets. I can totally see how previous technology (both limbs and limb pockets) would be more solid when torqued down. And I could see how a shim would be a good idea to ensure this. But with today's product, the testing that goes into them and such, if it were the case, there is no doubt that the companies like Hoyt and Bowtech would have/sell those shims with the bow. I'd suggest like others to back it out to fit you, and if there is any loss in function, it will be more than made up by your comfort...
 
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