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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Today I was paper tuning my bow and noticed that at close range a bad release would give a marked horizontal tear.

It will become my standard release drill from now on!

Note: I shoot a ProTec 2 under; good releases gave bullet holes (bow was correctly tuned).
 

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Hm how about stiffer (indoor) arrows? - they don't oscilate and bend as much as those outdoor which are generally not as stiff... Two different types should leave different marks, rite?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's not about tuning.

A well tuned bow with a good release will leave bullet holes in the paper.
A bad release will imprint an horizontal motion to the arrow. Bigger, smaller, doesn't matter.

That's what one shall look for.

BTW, I was shooting CT whitetails 45/60 - .425 spine, 29" shaft, 125g points (+inserts) at 43#.
 

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Jorge Oliveira said:
It's not about tuning.

A well tuned bow with a good release will leave bullet holes in the paper.
A bad release will imprint an horizontal motion to the arrow. Bigger, smaller, doesn't matter.

That's what one shall look for.

BTW, I was shooting CT whitetails 45/60 - .425 spine, 29" shaft, 125g points (+inserts) at 43#.
Jorge, you said you felt they were weak... With those 125gr points even the FOC is messed (by tap it's 13.36%) - Did you try the 100 grain ones? TAP gives 10.76% foc, which is great - and you might even can crank your bow back up again?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dado

Some data was missing: CB unibushings 9g, G nock 7g, CT insert 11g. So FOC is very close to 12%.
And the 7~12% FOC range is not cast in stone - a higher FOC arrow is considered better for long distance shooting, many indoors shooters, due to overspined fat shafts use very heavy points.

But if I need to I will go to 100g points for sure
 

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Jorge Oliveira said:
Some data was missing: CB unibushings 9g, G nock 7g, CT insert 11g. So FOC is very close to 12%.
And the 7~12% FOC range is not cast in stone - a higher FOC arrow is considered better for long distance shooting, many indoors shooters, due to overspined fat shafts use very heavy points.

But if I need to I will go to 100g points for sure
Yeah... How heavy are your feathers/vanes?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Actual - 4" Duravanes, 8.7g each

Going to 3" Vanetecs - 7.6g each.
 

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Jorge Oliveira said:
Actual - 4" Duravanes, 8.7g each

Going to 3" Vanetecs - 7.6g each.
Geez duravanes are so lighter than my 4'' bohning (I think they are 12gpi)...
 

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The Bohning vanes seem to be so much more resilient than the Duravanes. I've been considering changing the shop over to the Bohning Killer and X-vanes as standard. I had not realized that they were so much heavier. The low profile X vanes are quite a bit lighter however and are just as effective.
Are you happy with the Bohning vanes overall?
Not trying to hijack your thread Jorge, but its hard to find people using the Bohning vanes out there to get opinions from :smile:
Sounds like you are making headway with the Whitetails.
Keep in mind that on your paper tears, that a wrist flick can cause you to tear different also. Still would be good feedback to have however.
I've been considering shooting fingers this winter. I only started using a release a few years ago . I could use the practice again and who knows, may never want to use a release again. ;)
Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hello, Jerry

[A note re my first post in this thread - the drill involves shooting bare shafts!]

Just to bring the thread on topic again :D

Today I went to the range and shot bare shafts at paper.
For the first 30 min or so most of the shots were bullet holes, and just to chek I shot 3 arrows at a target - shaft hitting shaft at 15m.

Then I started to loose my form :confused: , bullet holes started to become tears - horizontal , vertical and in between, and no matter how hard I tried just a few were bullet...
Some were horrible horizontal tears, some 3~4" wide!

And off topic again :D :D

It would be interesting if you could do a compare between the Bohring and Vanetecs.
 

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I'm sorry to disappoint you guys, but I only went for bohning because I got a deal on CE LineJammers ($45/dz.) and since they were so stiff I tried to make up the spine with 145gr. points, which then made FOC skyhigh, so I basically looked for any vanes that were heavier than 'average' vanes. I was aiming to have 40 grains in fletching, but I could have had that only with quik-spins which were too expensive and some archers pointed out that they are too rigid and that I needed them only if I knew what I was doing :) - so 3 bohning 4'' vanes weighing 36 grains seemed like the next best thing. Having said this, I can't really compare them because I only got this one old arrow fletched with duravanes. Besides they're looking lighter they also seem a bit less stiffer, even though the bohning doesn't look like they're made of solid plastic they are a bit more 'firm'... That's all I can say, I can't tell which would help arrow stabilize better.
 
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