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There is so much talk about back tension and releases and target panic but I was wondering what is the mental approach to releasing an arrow using a trigger release. I can see where a back tension release seems optimum because all you think about is aiming but with a trigger release you have to be conscious of when to finally release your arrow.

My approach starts when my pins have settled, then I start with some back tension but not alot. At some point my sight picture will settle down even more and then I begin squeezing the trigger. No matter how much I try this is still requires conscious effort which causes me to quit thinking about aiming. Is there a way to get the trigger release to be unconscious act? I wear it fairly snug so pulling on my riser until it slips enough to release the arrow don't seem possible. Just curious what other serious shooters do.... thanks
 

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I have a fully adjustable release and I've found that adjusting the trigger pressure to near zero helps, also same as shooting a rifle, squeeze your whole hand around the release like you're making a fist instead of pulling the trigger.
 

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I shoot a trigger release and I do it totally conciously. I know exactly when the shot will go off. Trigger control is something that I am lucky enough to have been blessed with. I shoot HP rifle sillouhette in the summer months and have done it for years. Unlike shooting a bow there is no way around target panic on a rifle. No back tension. If you have target panic you need to find a way to get over it, and I think practice is the only way. I started shooting spots fairly seriously this year and had a flinch. I dont have it with my rifle but had it with the bow. I shoot almost daily with the bow and have since gotten over my flinch. I average around 55 xs on the five spot and have shot as high as 59. Just today I shot a 28x on the vegas target so I know you can be a great shot with a trigger release. You have to practice. If you can shoot an air rifle or a .22 to work on trigger control, do it. Shoot off hand (no bench or slings while standing) and shoot at a can or something at 10yds. move back to 20 when you get comfortable and keep moving back as you improve. It most likely wont happen in a short time. The one key to all of this is be PATIENT! Gun or bow, the pin or crosshairs will eventually float over the x and wham, pull the trigger. If you get tired and start to shake let down and start over. If you plan on shooting well with a trigger release lighten up the trigger as light as you can and still be safe. This way you don't have to "squeeze" this may not sound conventional but the best off hand rifle shooters shoot like this and therefore use very light triggers so they can in a sense "slap" the shot off. I believe a trigger release with a bow is no different. Back tension releases are a great way to shoot but if you can overcome target panic I think you can shoot a trigger just as well. The bottom line is that if you have your trigger set nice and light you can concentrate on aiming until you are ready to "touch" the shot off. No squeezzing involved. This is what I do anyway and Im sure you'll get plenty of advice!

Good Luck
 

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Back Yard Champion
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Mixed right and wrong thinking. Back tension can be learned to set off any release is more correct. It's a matter of learning. I don't know if the article is up yet, but try John Dudley's site. Knowing where and what back muscles coming into play helps. I'll probably make it sound easier than it is and maybe not totally correct, but here goes: Draw, anchor, aim, place finger on trigger (feel it and if too light set heavier), aim, aim, and aim while tightening the back muscles between the back bones and shoulder blade. Note; keep drawing elbow level - it should go straight back, not down or up. Also read back tension in General Archery Information.
John's site - http://www.dudleyarchery.info/articles/usarcher1FT.pdf
 

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I should've added this so it makes a little more sense. Squeezing a trigger is exactly what you would want to do with a rifle off a bench. But shooting off hand you dont want this. Too much movement. Thats where the light trigger comes in. You can just touc the shot off and have a near zero effect on your aiming when you shoot.
 

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One thing in any sport is that there is no concrete (written in stone) way to do something. If you are successful at it use what works for you! There are a lot of different methods to get the desired result. This works for Justin, and practice pays divedends like with anything. No one bats the same, shoots basketball the same, etc.


I shoot a trigger release and I do it totally conciously. I know exactly when the shot will go off. Trigger control is something that I am lucky enough to have been blessed with. I shoot HP rifle sillouhette in the summer months and have done it for years. Unlike shooting a bow there is no way around target panic on a rifle. No back tension. If you have target panic you need to find a way to get over it, and I think practice is the only way. I started shooting spots fairly seriously this year and had a flinch. I dont have it with my rifle but had it with the bow. I shoot almost daily with the bow and have since gotten over my flinch. I average around 55 xs on the five spot and have shot as high as 59. Just today I shot a 28x on the vegas target so I know you can be a great shot with a trigger release. You have to practice. If you can shoot an air rifle or a .22 to work on trigger control, do it. Shoot off hand (no bench or slings while standing) and shoot at a can or something at 10yds. move back to 20 when you get comfortable and keep moving back as you improve. It most likely wont happen in a short time. The one key to all of this is be PATIENT! Gun or bow, the pin or crosshairs will eventually float over the x and wham, pull the trigger. If you get tired and start to shake let down and start over. If you plan on shooting well with a trigger release lighten up the trigger as light as you can and still be safe. This way you don't have to "squeeze" this may not sound conventional but the best off hand rifle shooters shoot like this and therefore use very light triggers so they can in a sense "slap" the shot off. I believe a trigger release with a bow is no different. Back tension releases are a great way to shoot but if you can overcome target panic I think you can shoot a trigger just as well. The bottom line is that if you have your trigger set nice and light you can concentrate on aiming until you are ready to "touch" the shot off. No squeezzing involved. This is what I do anyway and Im sure you'll get plenty of advice!

Good Luck
 

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I shoot both back tension and trigger. At spots and practicing I like to shoot back tension, however on the 3-D course I pull out the Carter Quickie Trigger.

When your practicing with a rifle you have a steady hold on a sand bag, so it is easier to squeeze the trigger (Mentally).

With a bow you do not have a sand bag, therefore when your pin begins to move around your mind may give up easily, in return you begin to punch your trigger when your pin is on the target.

The key to shooting a trigger effectively is to 1st learn how to aim. The 2nd is to mentally control your squeeze. It is completely mind over matter. However if can't aim you can't squeeze.

I have trained myself to squeeze and if my pin is not steady, I let down.

Learning how to aim:

1.Stand at 10 yards and just aim at the target. Over and over again. Then go to 20, 30, 40 and 50. This may take you hours, days or even weeks. Do this until your completely comfortable at aiming solid. Do no fire a shot until you are comfortable aiming. This is very important, you have to be disciplined enough to not shoot until your mind tells you can aim.

2. Tie a 30lb dumball to a rope(Or Less depending on how strong you are). Hold it up in place with your arm straight. This will build your muscles up with your aiming arm.

3.Mentally prepare yourself to only squeeze your trigger while aiming.

4. Go shoot.

There are alot of good releases on the market. I choose to shoot a carter quickie 1+ because it has no trigger travel and it feels like your sqeezing against a wall unitl it releases. I have found with other releases if you can feel trigger travel it will also cause you to punch. But shoot what feels good for you.

Thats what I do, maybe it will help you.
 

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i can fire a trigger release with zero thought going into the release. it's not hard to shoot a trigger release with back tension no different than shooting a hinge release.
when shooting my trigger release i just wrap my finger around the trigger and try to pull my hand out through the wrist strap (so to speak) there is no movement at all in my trigger finger. and the shot happens with out thought.
watch the micheal braden video he shows and explains the proccess pretty well.
 

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I've done a lot of standing match rifle shooting and you really need to adapt your trigger release to take into account the unsteadiness of your aim. The last thing you want in this type of shooting is a surprise release - the result will indeed surprise you, and not pleasantly.:eek:

Ditto archery. I shoot an Overkill Tournament 1000 release aid and I chose this because it feels like a top quality match rifle trigger and is fully adjustable for weight. Mine is set fairly light so that I can touch it comfortably and hold my finger on it until I am ready to release.

If you are shooting indoors, it really doesn't matter what type of release aid you use, although I would still use the Overkill, but outdoors, shooting a full FITA round (90, 70 50 and 30metres) in a wind, the last thing you need is a surprise release. A nicely executed back tension, surprise release happening just as your bow is blown right off target is not going to please you, so you need to use the standing rifle technique.

This technique involves either resting your trigger finger lightly on the trigger or pulse touching it, and hold the bow as still as you can and when a slight lull occurs in the wind and your sights settle briefly into your normal hold area, you then deliberately, but gently commit to the shot without any hesitation by smoothly and quickly triggering the release.

The hardest thing to learn about this technique is not to tense up at the instant of release. This requires a lot of practice. Also, when I say you must "commit" to the shot, I mean that you execute it immediately without any hesitation at all and it needs to be done quickly before the wind affects you again.

A 20 knot gusting crosswind is going to test any archer, particularly at 70 and 90 metres. Don't make it harder for yourself by not having any control over when the trigger releases.:)
 

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Francis
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I have fought off bad target panic quite nicely by learning how to shoot using "back tension" weight transfer might be a better term, with all style releases.

Even though I have become an excellent at this technique I still find a lighter trigger works best for , less effort to fire and more consistent shot to shot.

however when shooting outside when it might be windy, bad terrain ect... there seems to be nothing as accurate as just hitting the trigger when the pin is where you want it

I am thinking of going back to an index finger release and trying to master this technique for all my outdoor shooting whether fita or 3d

curious what release you use for your shooting ?
a light trigger and timing the trigger is what screwed me up to begin with, but I feel confident enough now that I can play around again.

between scott , truball, or trufire, a crisp trigger with no felt movement is the key for me , what triggers have you tried that you liked?
 

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Francis
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a former pro archer has offers instruction in dvd or cd format I think on how to shoot a trigger release like this, I dont remember the name....could it be Frank Pearson?
 

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Shooting indoor spots is one thing. Trying to shoot through a calm patch on a windy day out doors at 100 yds is some thing else.
 

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more tension

I found that adding more tension to the release trigger helped me. Try it yourself and see what you think. You definatly will feel the difference.
 
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