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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to all of this Traditional and I just got a Hoyt Gamemaster II 50# - 28". I am using the rest that came with it but it is falling apart. What is a good rest for a recurve bow? Thanks, Brad
 

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Hello Brad,

New to all of this Traditional and I just got a Hoyt Gamemaster II 50# - 28". I am using the rest that came with it but it is falling apart. What is a good rest for a recurve bow? Thanks, Brad
Falling Apart??

Just by what I am reading here, you may have some problems.
Two off the top of my head for starters:

1. Wrong spined arrows.
2. Shooting with vanes instead of feathers.
3. Form problems.

That rest should last quite a while. If it doesn't, that means there is contact with your arrow someplace.

Granted, I cannot see your setup, know what it is, or see what is happening, your rest off a new bow should last a while.

You can buy a 3 or 4 dollar flipper rest that will last quite sometime, and will serve you very well.

Dwayne
 

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Hoyt felt rest

Hey

Those felt rest are not very lasting. I had a similiar rest that falls apart very easy. You can furniture pads that stick to the pegs of the chair bottoms and build youself one that will hold up better. There was a thread with this type of rest, I will try to get latter.

thanks
Fingershooter
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello Brad,



Falling Apart??

Just by what I am reading here, you may have some problems.
Two off the top of my head for starters:

1. Wrong spined arrows.
2. Shooting with vanes instead of feathers.
3. Form problems.

That rest should last quite a while. If it doesn't, that means there is contact with your arrow someplace.

Granted, I cannot see your setup, know what it is, or see what is happening, your rest off a new bow should last a while.

You can buy a 3 or 4 dollar flipper rest that will last quite sometime, and will serve you very well.

Dwayne

As stated earlier, I am new to all of this. I just bought some Easton 2117 but they came with the regular vanes not the feathers. Is it better to shoot with feathers??
 

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As stated earlier, I am new to all of this. I just bought some Easton 2117 but they came with the regular vanes not the feathers. Is it better to shoot with feathers??
I believe that you are over spined for the bow. The guys that I shoot with usually shoot a little under "spine." @ 50 lbs, one guy uses 1913 aluminum but others are shooting up to 1916... but most do shoot aluminum as do I.

It just seems to be more forgiving in the long run.
 

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Yes, you are a little overspined...

Overspined on top of using vanes is probably 90 percent of your problems, if not 100 percent.

A overspined arrow will not do the proper paradox at the moment of truth. Depending upon spine, drawweight, Drawlength, etc, There is a chance the vanes are contacting with your rest as it tries to do the proper paradox or snake like move at the moment of truth to where it passes the rest.

Yes, Use feathers. If there is any contact at all, feathers will be a little more forgiving....On your rest, as well as your shot when things are not perfect.

Dwayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you guys. I will use these 2117's up and then knock her back a little bit. If anything, I can use these 2117 to get used to the bow. I can always fine tune it from there.
 

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There is nothing really wrong with those 2117's...

Using a overspined arrow will sometimes do to the rest, what is happening to you now (improper paradox), and a overspined arrow will shoot to the "left" of where you are aiming (if you are a right handed person).

The other thing that will happen (which is a plus, depending upon how you look at it) is that your "release" will become more critical.

In other words, your finger release becomes touchy, in which *you* must work on to become smoother and more consistent. :smile: This, in the long run, will make you a better archer.

The SAME exact scenario exists when shooting a 25 to 30 pound bow compared to a 40+ pound bow.

When a bow reaches a certain poundage, the string is so tight that it wants to slip out of the fingers on its own. On lighter pound bows, you must "LEARN" to release your string. Not only that, on lighter pound bows, you must LEARN to keep your form until your arrow hits its target. Small mistakes are amplified because of the lightness of the bow, the weight, and the speed.

About the best example I can give, is the difference between a Muzzle loader and a rifle shooter. Most rifle shooters (who have never shot a muzzle loader) can even hit a icebox at 50 yards. Why? because a rifle is "instantaneous when you pull the trigger, allowing you to make slight mistakes, and a Muzzle loader has "two" fires, slower flight, and must be held up WAY longer than a rifle. Thus, they drop the barrel too soon after pulling the trigger.

Dwayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is exactly what is happening to me right now. I am shooting to the left consistently.
 

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Hello Brad,

That is exactly what is happening to me right now. I am shooting to the left consistently.
Then aim a little to the right, enjoy shooting those arrows, and have fun to the content of your heart. When doing so, you will be honing your skills and especially your finger release. When you finally decide that you don't want to aim as much to the right, have money to waste, and want to change arrows, then go buy yourself the proper spined arrows. You won't lose either way.

Dwayne
 

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With your question, I was just about to recommend you use the felt pads also. But since you already have cut fur, maybe I should ask you where I'm going wrong!:wink: Congrats.
 

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Got ya..... Thanks for the help and two rabbits died already!!
Sounds like there is going to be a shortage of easter eggs next year...:wink:


Dwayne
 

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Get a good, quality elevated arrow rest that will allow to to tune your bow. The NAP rest has a problem of the head falling off, a lot, and it isn't the bst out there. You need a rst that has an arm that will move out of the fletchings way. The Cavalier arrows rests are some of the best, extremely simple to use, set up, and built to hunt with.
A lot of guys are now shooting vanes out of the metal risered bows with great results, and the new vanes, like the Bohning blazers, or the Bi-Delta vanes offer a lot better arrow control then do the feathers, and they are a lot more durable.
The GM is a bow that is designed to give you tunability that you can't get shooting it off the shelve, and a good rest will open your eyes to the bows tunability. Put some heavier field points on the arrows, pull the arrow rest in towards the riser, and the arrows will fly a lot better. The 2117's are a tough arrow to beat up, and they will take it.
 
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