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Discussion Starter #1
I use only one nock point that I nock just under. It is set approximately 3/8" above center.

Is there any problem with reversing the string when the center serving gets fuzzy at the nock point?

The second nock point would be approximately 3/4" away from the first, providing fresh center serving to use.

Inasmuch as my most frequent string maintenance is replacing the center serving after the serving fails at the nock point, this would double the time between serving replacements.

Ken C
 

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Don't see why not. As long as end loops and silencers don't interfere.

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String servings are designed to offer string protection from contact with the armguard. You're going to lose that protection. Might be a good time to buy a server and some serving material and learn to do it yourself.
 

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c -

Depends.

The upper loop is usually bigger than the lower, allowing it to slide down the limb when stringing/unstringing. You have to remember to string/unstring the bow "backwards".

A generic string will have the center serving centered, (typically 4" aove and 4" below the midpoint) a more custom one may have it offset, and you "might" end up with more serving above the nock than below.

Even with #4 Nylon, the serving shouldn't really start fraying under the arrow nock, and it's a good chance that your arrow nocks are too tight. A better approach might be getting the right size nocks and/or a serving jig with thinner material. Serving jigs are fairly cheap and it's a good skill to have.

Viper1 out.
 
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In addition to the good information above the most common string strand fracture point is at the nock location. When the serving fails at the lock location it is sound srting PM to remove the center serving and inspect the string strands for breakage. If all is good simply reserve the string. A sudden change in nock fit, loose serving at the nock location and or "necking" of the string at the nock location are all signs of string strand failure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nocks are S-nocks and pass the common test: The arrow does not drop off under its own weight and it does not twist the string.

I figure I shot 500 arrows from that string. Should the serving have survived that?

String is 60X dacron, 16 strand.
 

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500????? I bet I’ve shot more than 5000 shots on my current string with no adverse wear to the serving!!!!!! I have bows with strings that I bet have had 10,000 shots without the serving wearing out!

Something is amiss if you are wearing the serving out that fast!!!!!

Bisch


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Agreed my Angel served strings with correct fitting nocks get changed as a PM after 10K shots and I keep them as spares. I would reserve with a good quality serving, assure correct nock fit and check periodically for wear.
 

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"Inasmuch as my most frequent string maintenance is replacing the center serving after the serving fails at the nock point, this would double the time between serving replacements."
Reads to me that he already does his own serving when needed and has the tools/skills to do so ......
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Responders are correct: The S-nocks are too tight. I must have tested a skinny string and not the ones I am currently using for recurve and compound.

I have an inventory of carbon arrows with .244" I.D. and S-nocks--Easton & Bohning. They are too tight on the string. I looked for "large groove" S-nocks but could not find anything.

Inasmuch as .244 is pretty standard and some of my bows still have the factory strings and factory serving I am surprised that the S-nocks are tight.

I do have a serving tool but no string jig.

Any suggestions please? Drill out the S-nocks a bit?

Ken C
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I am the OP. I see that the standard remedy for tight nocks is to dip them in boiling water and pry the arms apart a bit. Not precise, but the price is right.
 

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I am the OP. I see that the standard remedy for tight nocks is to dip them in boiling water and pry the arms apart a bit. Not precise, but the price is right.
I would not call that standard or recommended. Nocks are cheap and easy to replace.
 

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CP -

Jim is correct, and a lot of the newer nock plastics may not respond to the hot water thing.
Just replace them, or get a thinner serving.

Viper1 out.
 

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I would not call that standard or recommended. Nocks are cheap and easy to replace.
Totally agree-- you risk creating fractures in the plastic which could result in a dry fire. I have never put my nocks in hot water but have had a dry fire because of a cracked nock-- they are not that expensive -as CJ and Viper said replace them.

Also I use S nocks on my arrows and have over 15K shots with minimal wear on the serving.
 

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I have never put my nocks in hot water although I have seated my aluminum arrows in chairs around the table prior to a tournament and told them "look you son-of a -b!&@(( straighten up and fly right or I'm shooting carbons!
 

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Reserving the straight part is pretty easy, even I can do it. I definately need some smaller nocks, too, tho. I only get 2-3 k shots before fraying. Caused one of my nocks to slip off mid-draw and resulted in a dryfire
 
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