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Discussion Starter #1
End of last season and now this season, I'm having a terrible time with r/l variation:

- I typically shoot about a 298 on a 300 Vegas round

- I went from 75% letoff command cams to 65% Accu Wheels

- In a practice session, the more I shoot, the more my impacts move to the left.

- I'm struggling. In my local shop, there are hunters and 3-d shooters but no spot shooters. I'm almost positive this is a bow-arm/shoulder issue. For about 40-50 arrow, I can get my shoulder low, push the bow to the target while achieving good back tension to pull into the "wall" of the cam until the release goes off. The bow goes straight toward the target and I know I've shot an X. Sooner or later, I start feeling my bow arm "fling" to the left upon release. I don't know what is changing.

Anyone care to share a similar experience/fix? Any advice on what to try and notice? My other thought is that this is a draw length issue. I'm trying to find a happy medium between anchor point, draw length and sight picture. If I anchor low and where it "feels good", my peep is too far from my eye to see well. If I anchor high, I feel like I have less control and if I go with a longer draw, I fatigue very quickly and the problem I described is accelerated.

Thanks for any thoughts,

-Scot
 

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I think that you answered your own question:

You're getting tired, and photographs will reveal what changes in your form.

It sounds like two cures are possible:

1. Use less energy

This could be a more recurve-like form, an easier draw, etc.

2. Buld more energy

Cross-train (run, lift, etc.).

It sounds to me that you're on the road to 300!

Good luck,

kgk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I know I'm getting tired. I have backed off on the draw weight (currently at 42 lbs.) and did notice I can shoot longer before I start drifting. I'm looking for that form flaw that's causing the "fling to the left". Photos are a good idea! I'll bring my camera on a tripod and kids and let them take lots of photos.

-Scot
 

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I'm almost positive this is a bow-arm/shoulder issue. For about 40-50 arrow, I can get my shoulder low, push the bow to the target while achieving good back tension to pull into the "wall" of the cam until the release goes off. The bow goes straight toward the target and I know I've shot an X. Sooner or later, I start feeling my bow arm "fling" to the left upon release. I don't know what is changing.

Try to use your skeletal support and just pull the release against the bow. Don't think about pushing the bow to the target. This is very difficult to repeat consistently. Use a straight bow arm, but don't "push" it out any further. Just pull against it and you'll stay fresh a lot longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Paul,

Thanks for the pointer! Asside from wading through miles of inane verbage from Mr. Science wan'a bes, there is excelent information in there. I was glad to see the comment about Dave's shoulder "crawling into his ear" as at the end of a session, I can definitely sympathize!

Jim,

I was looking for some photos of you shooting, I've been looking at Dave, Jeff Hopkins and others to see what their shoulder/arm looks like at full draw. My "push" is actually just as you describe it, lower my shoulder and extend my arm (which is straight, not bent). It's not really a "push", I just imagine "pointing" at the target with my bow arm.

Thanks again!

-Scot
 
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