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Discussion Starter #1
what method do you use to allow your release to fire? I think some hold the release with a more elongated hand, and then relax their index finger and tighten their middle finger to rotate the release. I've been trying a method of holding the release deep in my grip and keeping all my fingers tight, but with a relaxed hand and arm while pulling with my back and waiting for it to go off. How do ya'll do it?
 

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If I don't have everything from my upper arm to my fingers relaxed... my back tension release will not go off in the appropriate amount of time and have to let down. I have just enought tension in my finger tips to hang on to the release. I rotate no part of my hand, or change any tension in my fingers to get the release to go. 'Just back tension' :wink: You should get lots of responses for this thread.

Nick
 

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Nick1959 said:
If I don't have everything from my upper arm to my fingers relaxed... my back tension release will not go off in the appropriate amount of time and have to let down. I have just enought tension in my finger tips to hang on to the release. I rotate no part of my hand, or change any tension in my fingers to get the release to go. 'Just back tension' :wink: You should get lots of responses for this thread.

Nick
Ditto to the above. If you are manipulating your fingers to get the release to go off . . . well that it is a finger release, not a back tension release.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nick1959 said:
... I have just enought tension in my finger tips to hang on to the release....
Thanks for the reply, how deep do you hold the release with your fingers? Is it near the first joint away from the hand, so you are almost holding a fist, or near the second joint from the hand, next to the actual finger tips so your hand and fingers are extended?
 

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You will get lots of responses to this and I doubt there is a "correct" way. A good resource for how "back tension" works is Larry Wise's book Core Archery.

There are some winning pro's that advocate manually rotating the release with your hand.

There are winning pro's that advocate a totally relaxed hand, applying backtension and allowing the release to rotate in your hand. This is the method I like to do. However, I feel that back tension is NOT pulling straight back. The best way to describe it for me is to pretend you are going to wrap your draw elbow around the back of your head. While you can't actually do this, the initiation of that motion will cause the release to fire.

I hold the release between the two middle knuckles. This gives you the most relaxed grip in my opinion.
 

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LEADWORKS said:
Thanks for the reply, how deep do you hold the release with your fingers? Is it near the first joint away from the hand, so you are almost holding a fist, or near the second joint from the hand, next to the actual finger tips so your hand and fingers are extended?
I hang on to the release just past the first finger joints. I've tried the deep hold and it doesn't work for me.

Nick :cocktail:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've been trying just about every way that other people are using to activate the release and the hardest part is deciding which method works best for me, because they all work, but I'm still figuring out which works best for me. Breaking in a new release is a pain!
 

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LEADWORKS said:
I've been trying just about every way that other people are using to activate the release and the hardest part is deciding which method works best for me, because they all work, but I'm still figuring out which works best for me. Breaking in a new release is a pain!
DITTO
 

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LEADWORKS said:
I've been trying just about every way that other people are using to activate the release and the hardest part is deciding which method works best for me, because they all work, but I'm still figuring out which works best for me. Breaking in a new release is a pain!
Me too!

I'm think that before you settle on the way that you will manipulate your release, you have to decide exactly how you will use your back muscles, the amount of travel that you will have in your release and the micro adjustment of your bow's draw length.

All of these things are inter-related you have to balance all the factors to get the one that shoots the best for you.

Are you going to push your elbow straight back in line with the arrow or are you going to pull your elbow around behind you? Is your release set with lots of travel or a hair trigger?

If you push your elbow straight back, this usually means that you will need to slightly relax your index finger and let the release turn in your hand that way.

If you are pulling your elbow around behind you, usually you just have to keep your hand and fingers relaxed. Just the motion of your arm moving back will set it off unless you have a lot of travel in which case, you may have to soften your index finger.

If you have a lot of travel in your release, you may have to manipulate your release with fingers or wrist no matter how you move your elbow.

I hope the Eric Griggs and / or Nathan Brooks post on this one. They seem to have their releases set up with a lot of travel. It would be great to get their take on this as well as other successful shooters.

GRIV recommended the elbow straight back with softening of the index finger. I think that this is the one that I will finally settle on, but it feels awfully easy & stable to shoot the elbow back method.
 

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Last week i purchased CORE ARCHERY by Larry Wise. Best investment i have made yet in terms of archery. In the book, an exercise is described on how to practice proper back tension while using your release, AND NOT USING YOUR BOW. get the book, you will be glad you did !! easy enough reading, and only about $12.
:tongue:

south-paaw
 

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IMO as long as your back is holding the weight and taking over the shot it really doesn't matter how you activate the release,what does matter is that the tension used to set off the release comes from the back muscles.Tension in the hands and/or arms will spoil the shot,relax the hands and arms and the back muscles will hold and shoot the bow better,those back muscles are slow to react and strong to hold the weight without fatique less likely to allow panic to take over.How you hook up to the release is all a matter of personal preferance you just have to figure out which method is comfortable and successful for you,I don't beleive in giving in to the release by relaxing your fingers or hand in any way,this IMO can cause you to collapse upon release.More pull or hook-up of the outside fingers of the release hand will help rotate the release as long as the hand and wrist stay relaxed and it doesn't over controll the shot or interupt the back tension.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm going to buy "Core Archery" by Larry Wise, I've heard so many people recommending it.

Currently, when I increase the tension in my back muscles to commit to the shot, my elbow starts outside the line of the arrow a bit, and moves to the left. My release hand is positioned palm horizontal, so my elbow moving back to my left causes the release to fire....eventually. I have pretty short travel set on the release cam, so I don't really move or relax my fingers at all, they are tight, but my hand, wrist, and the rest of my arm are relaxed... theoretically.

My wife holds the release with more relaxed fingers, and she allows it to rotate a bit in her fingers at the same time her elbow is moving back.
 

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LEADWORKS said:
I'm going to buy "Core Archery" by Larry Wise, I've heard so many people recommending it.

Currently, when I increase the tension in my back muscles to commit to the shot, my elbow starts outside the line of the arrow a bit, and moves to the left. My release hand is positioned palm horizontal, so my elbow moving back to my left causes the release to fire....eventually. I have pretty short travel set on the release cam, so I don't really move or relax my fingers at all, they are tight, but my hand, wrist, and the rest of my arm are relaxed... theoretically.

My wife holds the release with more relaxed fingers, and she allows it to rotate a bit in her fingers at the same time her elbow is moving back.
LEADWORKS:

Core Archery is an excellent book.
You will enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
AKDoug said:
AKDoug, thanks that thread is awesome. It's convinced me to try adding a little bit more travel to my cam, because sometimes my release fires prematurely as I'm relaxing my hand/wrist/arm before it's completely relaxed and I'm ready to further increase back tension. Scares the crap out of me. I'm trying it now in my basement. I like it, it lets me get a lot more relaxed before the thing goes off.
 
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