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I have a question for you guys, when i raise my bow arm and my bow is to the right of the target and arrow to left this is obviously the rotational draw the arrow goes where i want most of the time but if i try to bring the bow right up on target my shooting goes down the drain, am i doing something wrong you think? i know its hard without a video i just cant figure out what would cause this?
 

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I'm not a fan of pointing your bow in any direction, but on target. Reason: well the main one is I'm pointing it on what I want to hit, but after 30 years of swing draw and rotational draw I can say it's not good on your bow arm shoulder joint. That's from a chiropractor.

Bowmania
 

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n -

Ah, that's not a rotational draw. While a linear draw is the easiest and most consistent to start with, your optimal draw pattern has to be between you and your coach, and no, just posting a video may not help. A good coach will be able to see if you are working with your anatomy or against it. Yes, to really answer that question, you really need someone watching you - in person.

Viper1 out.
 

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I've watched Arne Moe's video on rotational draw. I see what it is, but what is the purpose of drawing this way?

Emrah


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I've watched Arne Moe's video on rotational draw. I see what it is, but what is the purpose of drawing this way?

Emrah


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To use your back muscles to draw and get yourself into proper alignment at full draw so you can hold the weight with minimal effort.
 

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I've watched Arne Moe's video on rotational draw. I see what it is, but what is the purpose of drawing this way?

Emrah


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To use your back muscles to draw and get yourself into proper alignment at full draw so you can hold the weight with minimal effort and properly engage your back muscles.
 

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And to save wear and tear on your shoulder joint. The head of the humerus remains in the socket and rotates instead of sliding around.
 

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I have a question for you guys, when i raise my bow arm and my bow is to the right of the target and arrow to left this is obviously the rotational draw the arrow goes where i want most of the time but if i try to bring the bow right up on target my shooting goes down the drain, am i doing something wrong you think? i know its hard without a video i just cant figure out what would cause this?
My two cents lining up dead on point of aim introduces tension in your form, increases the physical stress on the body, makes opening the bow up harder by doing it one arm at a time, and also sets you up to have gravity drop your arm. I'd go for Olympic style form, which has elements of a swing draw in a sense that most Oly archers are opening the bow up as they bring it up.

I have tried pull up, lock on, and linear draw but felt like it was exhausting and fighting gravity, and can't believe the tension introduced by leveling off first helps the shot.
 

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Slight left alignment and a slight rotational draw really helped my alignment issues. Also the slight open helped for a cleaner release wth less face contact.
 
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