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Discussion Starter #1
I just received some Easton Jazz arrows and "matching" RPS inserts. Both are labelled 1716, but the inserts fit WAY too tight. As a test I twisted two different inserts into 3 different shafts and metal shavings came out. They wouldn't even seat all the way. One got stuck temporarily.

My question: The h*ll?

The inserts look unusual to me because they're mostly smooth instead of ribbed. Could it be a manufacting flaw?

I didn't cut the arrows or anything. Actually, I think the arrows are shorter than they should be. Easton shows them to be 29" stock length. They are 28" from the tip of the swage to the end of the shaft. Even with a nock they're only 28.5" end to end. They were shrink wrapped in a set of 12, so I don't think they were modified.
 

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Can you stick 'em in the freezer for a bit...then slide them in?

Just a thought...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Can you stick 'em in the freezer for a bit...then slide them in?

Just a thought...
That's an idea, but shouldn't Easton inserts fit Easton arrows perfectly? I'm thinking I have the wrong product or it was packaged wrong. A micrometer shows that the arrow outer diameter and wall thinkness are what they should be, so the problem must be the inserts.

Oh, one reason the freezer idea can't work is because I heat the inserts to apply hot glue!

The bigger problem is actually the arrow length being shorter than the stock length listed in Easton's chart. The arrows are meant for a 6-foot tall person.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wow, Easton said that stocks lengths can vary up to 1 inch! Mine are exactly 1" shorter than listed. They also said that the end can be "pinched" a little during manufacturing, so a little should be cut off the end. That makes them too short for me probably. I thought arrow companies were all about precision.

Made one fit by deburring the shaft and filing the collar end of the insert slightly.
 

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the Jazz is an economy and entry level target shaft. i am assuming you are shooting a low poundage recurve? l a 1716 really is not appropriate for a compound over 25-30 pounds if cut to 28"

you say you mic's the arrows...what did the insert say? too big?

cutting and squaring the ends of arrow shafts is the common norm.

since freezing the insert does not seem an option have you tried heating the shaft , then installing the insert? should work . it could be the inserts fit ok,and you are expanding when you heat them for glue?

they should be tight, if they werent you get alignment issues. you could try another glue as well, or glue in cb type points instead of screw ins... as a matter of interest i have never seen a Jazz with a screw in tip, we always used the glued field points.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I guess the entry level status somewhat accounts for the length tolerence. Considering the other specs, though, I figured length would be very close to the specs. (Straightness: ± .005. Weight: ± 2%.) Lancaster said they did have Jazz shafts that are 29" swage to cut end, and I was temtped just to order another dozen.

The limbs that these arrow are meant to be used with are 24# at 28" on a 68" recurve. I can increase the weight 5-10%. The plan is/was to use them up to maybe 30#. (One limb upgrade.) I wanted screw-in points to have the option to tune using point weight. 1716's are the smallest size that can be used with screw-in points. (The long 100 grain point might be the only thing that make the arrows long enough to use!)

I found 1 out of 6 of the inserts slid in easy, but the collar end of the insert is slightly wider, so I still had to file it. I do believe that if the arrows were cut, the inserts /would/ fit as they should. I just need them to be maximum length. (6-foot tall shooter)

What I do is screw a "work" point into the insert and hold it with pliers while I heat it with a candle. Then I rub a hot glue stick on the insert, then twist it into the shaft. After a quick swish in some water, I scrape the excess glue off with my thumbnail. I don't apply heat directly to the shaft or insert.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah, that 1" basically made these arrows too short. My wife pulled the arrow through the clicker and didn't even have the string to her nose yet! (She did have her fingers curled around the string a good amount which added to her draw length.) The clicker was set to the back of the riser, so she pulled 29" AMO. Unfortunately, that included the long target point. So I think we need an arrow that is a 29" to 30" not including the point. Probably need to switch to carbons?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I decided to abandon the short Jazz 1716's and get Carbon Impact Super Club 15/25's. They're 30" stock length and spined close to 1714's from what I've read. (We probably need them to be weaker anyway.) First time going with carbon.
 

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First off...you're supposed to debur them. Take a razor blade and chamfer the inside of the arrow where the insert fits into. This has to be done. That's why some fit and some don't. When they were cut to length, the cutting process left a little bit of Al in the shaft. It takes all of 3 minutes to clean them up. It's not the end of the world.

And as far as the arrows not cut to the proper length...who gave them the measurements, and how did you measure them?

And, was it Easton that cut them, or the seller???
 

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Measuring arrow length is SO simple, but of course, not everyone does it the same way! The arrow length IS from the inside of the nock (where the string sits), to the end of the shaft. Is this how you measures them? If not, that's why they're too short.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
First off...you're supposed to debur them. Take a razor blade and chamfer the inside of the arrow where the insert fits into. This has to be done. That's why some fit and some don't. When they were cut to length, the cutting process left a little bit of Al in the shaft. It takes all of 3 minutes to clean them up. It's not the end of the world.

And as far as the arrows not cut to the proper length...who gave them the measurements, and how did you measure them?

And, was it Easton that cut them, or the seller???

Measuring arrow length is SO simple, but of course, not everyone does it the same way! The arrow length IS from the inside of the nock (where the string sits), to the end of the shaft. Is this how you measures them? If not, that's why they're too short.
Easton cut the shafts to "stock" length. They stated that there could be up to a 1" difference in their advertised 29" stock length. The ends were anodized still, so I know they were done at the factory. They are 28" from the tip of the swage to the end of the cut end. With a nock, the are 28-1/4" from the nock throat to the cut end of the shaft.

I deburred them, but most of the inserts were still tight. The inserts are slightly wider at the flange end and Easton stated that the manufacturing process might pinch the end of the shaft. There are little non-anodized marks near the ends where the machine held the shafts (I guess). Easton advised me to cut the shafts back just beyond those marks, so they're aware of the possible issues.
 
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