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· New Kid
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a Samick Sage (yeah me and about a million other folks) and recently I've started to wonder if mine is out of spec somehow with respect to the size of the grip. I tried someone else's Sage and it felt much narrower than mine.

So I measured around the narrowest part of the grip (see pic) and it's just a smidge over six inches. I'd appreciate it if you also have a Sage, to measure the same and report back here with the size. I used a piece of twine (anything that doesn't stretch will do) and wrapped around the narrowest part and marked the string, then measured the distance between the two marks to get the circumference of the grip.

Wood Hand Wood stain String instrument Hardwood


Since I have small hands I'm afraid that the grip is too large. My thumb and index fingers barely touch when wrapped around the bow.

Thanks for your assistance.
 

· Registered
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There may well be differences in grip circumferences in different batches or years with bows from some of the larger manufacturers due to shifting factories, material strengths, etc.

"Too large" is in the hand of the beholder, of course. If the grip is comfortable in your hand, you don't mind not touching index to thumb, and you enjoy the way the bow handles and shoots, then the grip size is not really an issue. My philosophical question would be ... were you happy with the grip before you noticed it was different from the other Sage's grip? And ... did you shoot the narrow-gripped Sage enough to realize that you prefer a narrower grip?

I have bows with grip circumferences ranging from ridiculously narrow to just plain fat. I let the fingers fall about each grip as the grip seems to like, and enjoy shooting them all (they each have an interesting and unique personality). On each bow the fingers do drape a bit differently. Oddly, I really can't say whether I prefer a thin or thick grip. I'm more concerned with how the pressure of the bow sits and feels within my hand at draw. I ignore the drape configuration of the fingers about the bow, for their purpose is merely keep the bow from flying out of my hand when I shoot, which they do quite nicely no matter their configuration.

However, if you indeed dislike your grip and believe it is working against you, there's nothing to lose in seeking out another bow that fits you more appropriately.

Good luck in your quest.
 

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The grip is very important and also very subjective, you like what you like. I will say that the term "grip" is a bit unfortunate since you shouldn't really be gripping your bow. There's really no need for your thumb and index finger to touch, in fact on most shooters they probably don't. With a relaxed hand and fingers, your thumb should point somewhere toward the target, fingers curled with the index and sometimes middle finger lightly against the back of the grip, ring and pinkie not touching or laying against the side of the riser.

That said, I don't have a Sage but measured my two most frequent shooters grips and came up with 4.5" and 4.75" at the smallest part of the grip. You could be like me and just prefer a smaller grip.
 

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Sages and other Samick-style woodies usually have grips on the big side.

However, what I have been taught to do is to set the bow in the v between thumb and forefinger. If I put fingers on the bow it is lightly, not wrapping around to touch fingers. So I use a sling. You really want the bow popping out of hand on the shot. I generally associate fingers all over the bow with death grip and torque. The bow does not pop out if you death grip, it usually torques to a side. The shot usually follows.

So, you have a point and some people have grip size preferences that sometimes derive from their hand or finger size. But since I've been taught let the bow jump out of hands without tight finger grip I wouldn't use can I wrap the bow in my fingers as the determinative test. I think the massive Samick woodie type grips are intended to accommodate a variety of sizes including people with big hands who do in fact death grip the pistol grip.

What people I know usually talk about on grips is whether it fits their high/medium/low style, whether there is a shelf to wedge their hand below, and they do consider narrow versus wider but more in the context of feel. Some people think skinny vertical grips without a palm bump encourage side torque but for smaller hands people you might be ok with it. But the test to me is more comfort with the grip and whether it fits the hand well or seems like it might create torque, and less can I choke the neck of the bow.

If you like a skinnier grip for your hands, I have found the SF Forged Plus has a skinny and not built up grip, no big old shelf. I conversely have big hands and I want a grip that's a little more built up and fits to my hand and has a shelf to wedge my hand beneath. It is too easy with my big hands to creep above shelf level towards the arrow. But it might be better for your size.

I'd just cope with the bow until you get your skills good, and when you look for the next one, I'd look at metal or carbon ILFs rather than woodies if the big grip is offputting. And if you get Hoyt or certain other bows there are even different grips you can buy and attach.
 

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I let the bow sit in the 'Y' of my left hand formed by the thumb and fore finger. My finger tips may touch the front of the bow, but the virtue of string being pulled back holds the bow in place. As been mentioned before if you have a 'grip' on it the flexing / movement at shoot will cause arrows to wander off where you thought they should go.
 

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I can only imagine how many bowyers are turning out Sage recurves. They literally make hundreds of thousands of them, so how on earth can there be a certain size. You won't even find that on the old American factory bows...or even the new ones. Individuality is part of the draw of bows that are hand finished, and one of the reasons it is important to handle a bow before you buy it. It certainly is no reason to return it or trade it. I've seen Bear Kodiaks of the same year that were totally different in the grip area..pivot point. If you already bought the bow, and need to adjust the grip, take a rasp to it, then sand it smooth.
 

· New Kid
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I can only imagine how many bowyers are turning out Sage recurves. They literally make hundreds of thousands of them, so how on earth can there be a certain size. You won't even find that on the old American factory bows...or even the new ones. Individuality is part of the draw of bows that are hand finished, and one of the reasons it is important to handle a bow before you buy it. It certainly is no reason to return it or trade it. I've seen Bear Kodiaks of the same year that were totally different in the grip area..pivot point. If you already bought the bow, and need to adjust the grip, take a rasp to it, then sand it smooth.
Fascinating point. I guess I always thought of Sages as being factory-made by machine, because it seems like such a mass-produced product that one would expect that kind of consistency.
 

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Dremel tool, file,sand, refinishing...

Just be careful you don't make it too weak...

I am considering doing some very fine modification myself, though I wonder if it should be accompanied by a trip to scotland, for adult supervision... :)

Metal risers allow grip modifications with a whole lot more confidence!
 

· Civil but Disobedient
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The Sage is a sourced bow and apparently shopped around. I had an archery shop owner show me a couple to make the point that the manufacturer had changed. There were distinct differences. The newer ones he showed had Win Win style limb labels.

It would not be a surprise if there are differences. What makes a Sage a Sage is that it is brown. Other than that, it is like most other entry level bows.
 

· Trad Shooter
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The grip on my Sage measures around 5.0" (plus or minus 1/8"). I suspect the limbs were made 5 minutes before quitting time - they're supposed to be #25 at 28", but they're actually #29 at 28" (as measured by the local bow shop). Other than that, it's a great bow.
 

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I have had two Samick Sages, a Samick Journey and another at some point who's name is unremembered. Of course the limbs I had were all interchangeable from bow to bow. It was all the inconsistencies, on both risers and limbs, that made me get rid of them all. The low end bow I have now from beating about and for teaching is A southwest Spyder. It is a Sage design but superior in very way and far more consistent. They are also great people to work with.
 
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