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I don’t hunt for the sport I hunt for the meat
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Discussion Starter #1
Im new to back tension releases soI apologize if this is a dumb question. I just bought it off a fellow ATer and I just started messing around with it. I was wondering how much pulling I should have to do to set it off it seems like 1 minute its too much I turn a tiny bit then its too little. Is it just my form or do I have to keep adjusting til I find out what is best. Thanks for the help I hope you can understand the question
Thank you
 

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Most likely it is form. The Evo is very sensitive to form which is one of the reasons it is such a good trainer. When I was using one I kept thinking something was wrong with it but the more I used it the the more I realized my form was breaking down and the release was fine. I know it's always easier to blame the equiptment but it's usually not the problem. Good luck.
 

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I don’t hunt for the sport I hunt for the meat
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Discussion Starter #3
Dont get me wrong Im not blaming the release at all Im just trying to get the feel on how to set it up.Whether it should take little pull or a fair amount or if its just preference?
 

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It is most likely your consistency (or lack of it). Not being critical, but the documentation that comes with the EVO clearly states that minute changes will not have an effect. The documentation recommends 4 full turns as a single adjustment. Plus, I hate to say it, but the EVO is not known as being the most consistent release out there.
 

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I don’t hunt for the sport I hunt for the meat
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Discussion Starter #5
It is most likely your consistency (or lack of it). Not being critical, but the documentation that comes with the EVO clearly states that minute changes will not have an effect. The documentation recommends 4 full turns as a single adjustment. Plus, I hate to say it, but the EVO is not known as being the most consistent release out there.
Got you I have no doubt that it is me I can admit that. Im just wondering how I can improve myself. I thought carter was a high end release thats why I bought the evo. I had a cheap hinge release I was shooting good with but wanted the safety for hunting
 

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Dont get me wrong Im not blaming the release at all Im just trying to get the feel on how to set it up.Whether it should take little pull or a fair amount or if its just preference?
It's mostly just preference. You want to have to work for it but don't want to have to pull till you are red in the face either. Also don't want it so light it goes off when you release the safety. I would say 3lbs above holding weight is a good "starting" point and you can adjust to what you like from there.
 

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I don’t hunt for the sport I hunt for the meat
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Discussion Starter #7
It's mostly just preference. You want to have to work for it but don't want to have to pull till you are red in the face either. Also don't want it so light it goes off when you release the safety. I would say 3lbs above holding weight is a good "starting" point and you can adjust to what you like from there.
Thank you for everything
 

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evo stuff!

I shoot the evo also and has helped me tremendously! Been learning back tension and this is the tool I use. In the beginning it was a pain!!!!!! poundage was changing and other crazy things. but once my form started to get more consistant it quit changing for some reason. So I have to say that my form has changed for the better. I still haven't got it as good as I want but gaining. On poundage like mentioned 3 to 5 lbs above holding weight. As you get your form down you might want a little tighter like 2.5lbs. this won't happen in a month either but takes some time and that depends on you shooting habits and arrows downrange time. this little release will tell you when your doing it wrong. If your haveing problems pulling through your not using your back. I used to lock up and couldn't pull it because I was using my bicep or shoulder for some crazy reason. I'm a big guy and couldn't pull 16.5 lbs and it was imbarrasing. Looked like i was haveing a seizure or something. Be sure to get all the way up in your hand not hanging out a little because you can cheat it. Any more questions just drop a PM. Really pleased with the results I've gained with this release and getting better. Maybe their are better releases out their but this one has worked for me. I had started getting target panic and had to do something before it took control of me and destroyed me. This was my cure.
 

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I got over TP with the Carter squeeze me same idea as the evo, I found two things, have to give it a little oil every now and again to keep it consistent, over time it felt like it would get heavier then be inconsistent until I oiled. Second I would recommend setting it on the very heavy side to start, keeps you from punching the release. I found as my form got better and actually learned to use the right muscles in the back that what I thought was heavy to start was actually just right or on the light side.
Hope this helps
 

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there was a thread on here a while back about the inconsistencies of the Evo (or maybe Revolution...same thing, pretty much), which everyone agreed could be fixed with a light coat of oil. take it apart (carefully!) to get at all the contact surfaces.

my experience with the Revolution was similar to the other posts here. tough as nails to go off before my form started improving. i was shaking all over the place using arm muscles to get it to go off.

one of the keys is keeping your anchor point VERY consistent. when you settle into your anchor, and before you release the safety, really pay attention to how much force you're still pulling on the string. when the release is set light it can go off seemingly without any effort as soon as you release the safety. but that's just because you're pulling harder than you did the last time.

keep at it, it will really help!

ps - i've heard other people say this isnt really a good hunting release, because of how sensitive it is to form flaws. it's not always possible to get your form perfect in the woods, and you dont want to be struggling with the release when there's a big buck in front of you...
 

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I have a Squeeze Me, and have shot the Evo a good bit too. I talked to the guys at Carter and they recommended a Dry Lube, like Remington Dri Lube. When you first lube it, it will go off too easy for 10 shots or so, then settle down and be really consistant for months. You might blow it out with an air hose before you lube it to get rid of any dust.

John Dudley has a great article(s) on back tension on his site. It's in a back issue of Glade Magazine. He talks about the importance of keeping your bow arm shoulder down. If you let it ride up, the bow arm shoulder blade blocks the drawing arm shoulder blade and keeps you from drawing. This makes it seem like you are drawing a ton. Another thing that happens is that you tense up your other muscles, but not really the ones that draw the bow. You feel like you are really working, but you aren't accomplishing anything.

Try this. This is from John Dudley's article. Stand upright with your arms straight out to your sides, palms open and thumbs up. Make a stop sign with your bow hand, which will rotate your thumb forward about 45 degrees. Pivot your bow arm forward til it touches your chest while leaving your elbow essentially in it's original place. Now pull your hand across your chest toward your draw elbow. That's all you are trying to do! If you make it that simple, it is easier. Stand up straight, take a deep breath, stick your chest out and do it. Now repeat that 5000 times. Simple.

The Evo is more of a training aid than a target or hunting release. Unless your form is perfect, it will be greatly affected by shooting uphill or downhill.(easier downhill, harder uphill)

Check out "Core Archery" by Larry Wise, and "Idiot Proof Archery" by Bernie Pellerite.

Good Luck
 

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I bought one from the classifieds in January. Took me a while to get used to it but then my scores started improving. Then all of a sudden without adjusting anything on the release, I couldn't get it to go off. Yes form needs to be perfect. Someone suggested a drop of oil and WUALLA!!! Now it seems to go off consistently everytime and I shoot ALOT! Like everyday. Haven't had to oil it since February either. It has made me the best shot of my life. I plan on hunting with it this year. I hope thats not a mistake. Soon I will be practicing with it from a treestand to get the feel for different angles. I'm sure different angled shots up and down hill during outdoor summer league will also help me. Hopefully I won't have to switch back to the punchomatic this fall.... Good Luck.
 

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Everyone is pretty much "on" with their comments.

I wrote an article specifically about the Carter Evolution Plus...and had supporting data to support my findings. I think it is Vol. 13 No.6, 2008???

Some extremely important things about trying to learn to shoot the Evo+

1. SET IT AND FORGET IT...do NOT keep tinkering with the setting on the release. If you do, you learn NOTHING...other than to keep blaming the release for what ails YOU.

2. The "to anchor drawlength" is CRITICAL with the Evo+ release. ANY too long is going to give you fits in getting the Evo+ to shoot WITH you (notice I didn't say "for" you)...Remember YOU shoot the release, "IT" doesn't shoot by itself, ha. A "touch short" is better than ANY too long on DL.

3. Hand positioning at your anchor is also something that has got to be consistent. If you try to tighten up your hand to get it to fire...it ain't going to work. If you "let up" any with the first finger (like some shooters do with trip gate back tension releases), it WILL NOT FIRE. Keep your fingers in contact with the release...but don't TIGHTEN THEM UP...if you do, you are now shooting HAND/ARM tension and not back tension...the release will be extremely tough to fire.

4. Peep height had better be right. Too LOW is normally a problem indoors...and this puts tension on the tops of your shoulders, into your forearm and hand, and of course your neck. You start to dipping your chin to get to the peep...the drawing shoulder comes up, the drawing elbow comes up, and the site...well...it drops out the bottom...causing you to use BOW ARM MUSCLES...to raise the site back to the middle...then everything is TIGHT excepting the back muscles needed to trip the release!

5. Do not "rotate the elbow" around behind you...this is NOT a trip gate release, and pivoting the release will not make it fire.

6. You "can" cheat this release, but don't expect to hit much when you do, hahaha. Many have learned how to cheat it...but they don't score well when they do, and they then blame the release for being inconsistent when THEY are the culprit!

7. Do NOT "snap back/jerk" the release with a rapid tug to get it to fire....you are going to miss big time! Also, don't just simply let the bow "creep" to the front of the valley to have the BOW hit the poundage limit...that won't ever work for shooting consistently high scores, because then the BOW is firing the release...and you are along for the ride, doing NOTHING but collapsing.

8. If you are having problems getting it to trip...it is YOU (Most likely). Setting it "lighter" will normally only add to the problem because then you will be apprehensive and start to let off the safety "slowly" and at the same time letting up on your BACK tension and use your arms/shoulders...NOT GOOD.
I've found it better to shoot it HEAVY in setting, rather than light.

3-5 pounds over holding weight seems to be a pretty good range for setting the tension on the release.

By the way....1/2 turn on tension...does hardly anything for the setting...it might make you "think" you've really made a huge adjustment...but in reality, you haven't.

Also...IF/when you reset the tension on the release...shoot MANY shots before you decide anything. It takes several shots before you have a clue.

SET IT AND FORGET IT...seems to be a much better approach, however....once you know the above items, that is.

field14 (Tom D.)
 

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Sorry for resurrecting a dead thread, but this is a very special release and training tool and I want to add to the discussion!
I’ve been using this release for the better part of a year and yes, I’m also finding some inconsistencies and I’m starting to think it’s not my form and technique because I’ve noticed inconsistency in the firing weight when I measure it on my Easton bow scale.
QUESTION: does it matter when you make adjustments in the firing weight: does the jaw have to be open or can it be locked/closed?
Here’s a photo of the Evo+ taken apart:
 

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Sorry for resurrecting a dead thread, but this is a very special release and training tool and I want to add to the discussion!
I’ve been using this release for the better part of a year and yes, I’m also finding some inconsistencies and I’m starting to think it’s not my form and technique because I’ve noticed inconsistency in the firing weight when I measure it on my Easton bow scale.
QUESTION: does it matter when you make adjustments in the firing weight: does the jaw have to be open or can it be locked/closed?
Here’s a photo of the Evo+ taken apart:

Have you been cleaning + lubing it? Carter recommends a drop of rem-oil or equivalent at the base of the jaw every 1k shots or so. Some people in dirty/sandy environments say the cleaning needs to happen more frequently. I was having the same issue with my silverback until I cleaned and lubed it. No more problems after that.
 

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Everyone is pretty much "on" with their comments.

I wrote an article specifically about the Carter Evolution Plus...and had supporting data to support my findings. I think it is Vol. 13 No.6, 2008???

Some extremely important things about trying to learn to shoot the Evo+

3. Hand positioning at your anchor is also something that has got to be consistent. If you try to tighten up your hand to get it to fire...it ain't going to work. If you "let up" any with the first finger (like some shooters do with trip gate back tension releases), it WILL NOT FIRE. Keep your fingers in contact with the release...but don't TIGHTEN THEM UP...if you do, you are now shooting HAND/ARM tension and not back tension...the release will be extremely tough to fire.

4. Peep height had better be right. Too LOW is normally a problem indoors...and this puts tension on the tops of your shoulders, into your forearm and hand, and of course your neck. You start to dipping your chin to get to the peep...the drawing shoulder comes up, the drawing elbow comes up, and the site...well...it drops out the bottom...causing you to use BOW ARM MUSCLES...to raise the site back to the middle...then everything is TIGHT excepting the back muscles needed to trip the release!

field14 (Tom D.)
I think these might be my main culprits, We just started trying to shoot the Evo, i have a pretty fierce soreness in my forearm from about my right wrist to just below the elbow on the top side of my right arm. I often feel like i am pulling more with my arm or elbow then my back, i just cant seem to get my brain to make that work.

and i wonder if maybe #4 is part of that issue. Seems like i need to find that entire article.
 

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From the looks of the interior of that release it needs cleaned pretty badly, mine is shiny and no oil spots anywhere. I can see why your having issues from the looks of it. I would clean it up and use some rem dry lube on it.
 
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