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Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I love to bow hunt, but this year I'm going to try so target competition as well. I'm trying to set up my bow, but I'm not sure where to start when it comes to a rest and sight....I think I want to go single pin on the sight, but what kind of rest is best. I normally shoot a QAD ultrarest on my hunting bow, but should I look at a different style for competition???

Thanks

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Smilin' Bob
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I'd start out pretty basic with most of what you have now.


Save you're money...it's gonna get expensive real fast.
 

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Hello. I love to bow hunt, but this year I'm going to try so target competition as well. I'm trying to set up my bow, but I'm not sure where to start when it comes to a rest and sight....I think I want to go single pin on the sight, but what kind of rest is best. I normally shoot a QAD ultrarest on my hunting bow, but should I look at a different style for competition???

Thanks

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What class are you going to be shooting? Bow Hunter or Freestyle? That would dictate what you can and cannot put on your bow. You can use the QAD you have for competition. I know lots of shooters that use Hamskea, QAD dropaway rests on their target bows with absolutely no problem. I went with Spot Hogg Infinity Swap with a Lizard Tongue just to try something different and enable me to swap rests for different size arrows, but I was using a Hamskea Hybrid Target Pro for Target shooting for a while. Bow Hunter Class your limited to using up to a 5pin with no magnification and a non moving sight also nothing longer then 12" stabilizers. Freestyle Class you can use your hunting sight but most use a Target Sight with a Scope that has anywhere from a 2X-8X lens and a single pin, dot or circle. Freestyle Class allows for any length stabilizers.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sounds like if I start by setting up for Bow hunter class I can shoot either, right?

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Smilin' Bob
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Sounds like if I start by setting up for Bow hunter class I can shoot either, right?

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Yep.

You're gonna be learning lots of new procedures, I see no reason to complicate it with new equipment right off the bat. Keep it simple for a few.
 

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Yep.

You're gonna be learning lots of new procedures, I see no reason to complicate it with new equipment right off the bat. Keep it simple for a few.
I agree with Bobmuley... K.I.S.S. is always better...Keep It Simple Stupid. I was shooting a Hunting Bow in Freestyle and it was fine. If your just starting out in Competitions, just have fun! Learn, practice, shoot and have Fun!
 

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I would also suggest turning down your draw weight depending on your set up. Most likely you will be going from shooting "a few" shots in a day to possibly sixty shots in a couple hours. Then maybe some larger diameter shafts might be next on the list; many shooters like that .001" better chance of cutting a line.
 

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Smilin' Bob
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First thing I'd do is watch as many George Ryals (Griv on youtube) videos as you can to put yourself in the learning mindset and schedule a coaching session with someone near you. If the coach works for you schedule and prepay for another session in a week and another in a month. If there's no good coaches near you seek out the best shooters in your area and ask questions and see if they'll assist you. As a last resort try some online stuff (but it'll be tough for a newbie to differentiate the wheat from the chaff).

Write down everything:
-Any changes you make and the results it has on your shooting
-Your shot sequence (If you don't have one just google "archery shot sequence" and steal one - you can modify it to suit your shot.

Good call on first purchase being "target" arrows:

Let's continue for the next year - Ask tons of questions and try to demo, borrow, or otherwise touch and shoot as many different pieces of equipment as you can. Get your hand on as many releases as you can to see what fits comfortably in your hand.

After a couple months you'll have a feel for what style you want to shoot; (bowhunter - fixed pin sights and shorter stabilizers) or freestyle (pretty much open but easily recognizable with their magnified movable sights and long stabilizers).

Buy the release that suits you and your shooting style.

Buy good accessories to put on your current bow. Good stabilizers , Good sighting system, good rest, quivers, etc.

Then pick your bow...you already have all the accessories to put on it.

Always remember you're not competing against anyone but yourself.
 

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Practice Blank Baling! It will help build your shot sequence into muscle memory. For competition archery, you want every shot to be the same. So when you start hitting X's the shot can be repeatable over and over. Blank Baling at 5 yards should be part of the everyday practice routine.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Blank bailing? I'm guessing no target just routine and release who cares where it goes right?

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Back Yard Champion
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I usually urge what Bob has, start with what you have and gets some learning under one's belt.

I'm in this dilemma at the present, but for a young man. His mother is in on it also, but neither really knows just how much is needed. The bow is one thing, but the investment in accessories can be tremendous even if going the Classifieds. Neither know the depth of things for target shooting, 5 spot, Vegas, even 3D. The young man knows I have a new bow coming and wants my present bow. Wish I wasn't in the position I am.

The young man's first new bow...it had to be sent back to the factory. I felt sorry for him so I loaned him my old 2009 Pearson TX4, 33 1/2" ata and brace height of 6 1/4". IBO is given of 342+ fps, but I have bow down to 55 pounds and set to 28 1/2" draw. The bow is something else. Everyone that has shot it can't believe how accurate they are with it and then group arrows slapping close. The young man is shooting my bow lights out. Right now he could contend with the vast majority around the area in Bow Hunter Free Style.
 

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Blank bailing? I'm guessing no target just routine and release who cares where it goes right?

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Yes.... With your eyes closed so you can focus on the sequence of the release. Learn your sequence well so when you get shooting at targets, you will think less of the sequence and focus on the target.
 

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First thing I'd do is watch as many George Ryals (Griv on youtube) videos as you can to put yourself in the learning mindset and schedule a coaching session with someone near you. If the coach works for you schedule and prepay for another session in a week and another in a month. If there's no good coaches near you seek out the best shooters in your area and ask questions and see if they'll assist you. As a last resort try some online stuff (but it'll be tough for a newbie to differentiate the wheat from the chaff).

Write down everything:
-Any changes you make and the results it has on your shooting
-Your shot sequence (If you don't have one just google "archery shot sequence" and steal one - you can modify it to suit your shot.

Good call on first purchase being "target" arrows:

Let's continue for the next year - Ask tons of questions and try to demo, borrow, or otherwise touch and shoot as many different pieces of equipment as you can. Get your hand on as many releases as you can to see what fits comfortably in your hand.

After a couple months you'll have a feel for what style you want to shoot; (bowhunter - fixed pin sights and shorter stabilizers) or freestyle (pretty much open but easily recognizable with their magnified movable sights and long stabilizers).

Buy the release that suits you and your shooting style.

Buy good accessories to put on your current bow. Good stabilizers , Good sighting system, good rest, quivers, etc.

Then pick your bow...you already have all the accessories to put on it.

Always remember you're not competing against anyone but yourself.
I am in total agreement with the above reply. I even went as far as to get myself to a Ryals seminar last year at Lancaster Archery Supply. Best money I have spent working on my shooting. He is probably one of the best if not the best coaches out there for compound. It completely changed my game and my scores are now reflecting this. Look up Ryals “Thing a week”...or every other week...or thing when we get a chance. LOL. The videos are really helpful. Also watch his Facebook vids about “Being still” and “Letting Go”.


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My experience with archery equipment is that 95% of the time you get what you pay for. Stick with brands that are mainstream and you wont be disappointed. Yes good archery equipment cost money, but in many cases they are top notch products. Sights, Releases, Bows, Rests. Top of the line products from manufacturers are very similar and have similar features. Stay with brands that you know or what your local archery shop carries, that way if you have problems it will be easier to get them fixed or returned for service.

One important part of archery that I have found to be important is building a good relationship with your local archery shop. My local dealer has become a good friend and indispensable in giving me tips and information on becoming a better archer.
 

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The ultrarest should work perfectly fine for you. If you end up looking for a new test in the future, I have a Hamskea Hybrid Hunter Pro with a blade on it and love it. Hope this helps.
 

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I also agree with Bobmuley and the rest. I also shoot BHFS with a look-what-the-cat-dragged-in PSE worth about $100, homemade strings and a makeshift stab made out of a Beiter side rod. 10-24 thread Recurve pin in my compound sight and a pack full of small apertures for my peep. That's it. Turns out I can shoot that just as well as I can shoot a full-on freestyle rig, so that's what I shoot.

In other words, no need to spend any money; you can kill paper with any bow you want (in the appropriate class of course). I do agree with blindarcher that lowering the poundage is a good idea, unless you can already shoot say 30 shafts without fatigue. The key on poundage is it being light enough for the last few arrows of a round, not the first ones or the middle ones :). Being able to last all the way to the end is the idea....

lee.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So this is way late, but here is the update. I shot my first Vegas 450 round. Scored 409. But the first five rounds I shot with my contacts in. Side note: I don't practice with my contacts. The arrows scored 5s and 6s. I got frustrated, took out my contacts and threw them away. It was 8 and up pretty much the rest of the way.

My question is this, with contacts, the target is clear, and the pin is blurry, without contacts, the pin is clear and the target is blurry. Is there something I can do with my sights to.improve this. Currently I'm shooting a standard speed, and a single pin .019 sight...no magnification.

Thanks for any help

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You can check out Specialty Archery's verifier peep apertures. Sounds like with your contacts you're getting that old guy eyes effect where things far are clear due to the contact correction but the trade off is you lose clarity without bifocal correction on objects closer in. The verifier apertures are intended to act like a bifocal to clear up the image of the pin without impacting the clarity of the target. Some experimentation is usually needed to find that balance.

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