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Anti Fanboy
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Discussion Starter #1
I have always shot somewhat of a longer A to A bow. I recently got a new bow with a shorter A to A and I seem to be having a little trouble being consistent with it. Everything is in specs and when I shoot well it does it part. It just seems as if it is much more touchy when shooting. I would reckon its some sort of form breakdown on my behalf. Has anyone else experienced this sort of thing? About the only thing that I have not tried is a kisser button which I have gotten away from for the most part.
 

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I always had short bows 32" and less, after getting a 34" i will never go back. I can tell a big difference in the stability of a longer a2a.
 

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I have the pse ss. It took some paper tuning and a little adjustment on my grip for my hand , and it made a big difference. The grip on my bow was to narrow, so made a hand grip for it , and it shot great. I did notice that I had to have better form when shooting this short of bow.
Barry
 

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there is no doubt the longer a to a bows are steadier, a simple thing you can do would be to add a little weight to the bow,,, i shoot the short ones very well,, but still gain a few points whenever i shoot one thats a bit longer,,, however as a hunter i dont want anything to do with a longer bow, the short ones rule the woods where i live it hard to even sell a 34 inch bow and 35 and longer might as well be retired!
 

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I know short bows are "in" right now, but I have never had an issue with a 40" or 37" bow in a treestand. I can shoot a short bow well in practice but in an actual hunting situation when things can happen fast and unexpectantly and your form goes to heck as you yank your bow back and twist around and down trying to get a shot off before he walks out of your window, I appreciate the forgiveness the longer bow gives. Personally 34" is as short as I want and much prefer 35" to 37".
 

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I always had short bows 32" and less, after getting a 34" i will never go back. I can tell a big difference in the stability of a longer a2a.
Are you talking about hunting, or general shooting.

And what's your take on shooting out to 40 yards or less from a tree. Does your 34 inch rule make a big difference for you @ these shorter distances?
 

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Anti Fanboy
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Discussion Starter #7
I know short bows are "in" right now, but I have never had an issue with a 40" or 37" bow in a treestand. I can shoot a short bow well in practice but in an actual hunting situation when things can happen fast and unexpectantly and your form goes to heck as you yank your bow back and twist around and down trying to get a shot off before he walks out of your window, I appreciate the forgiveness the longer bow gives. Personally 34" is as short as I want and much prefer 35" to 37".
I can understand this completely on the forgiveness issue in the heat of the moment. I have a bow with a 33.25" A to A and a 7.25" bh and I have found that to be about perfect for my liking. I had a bow that was 36.25" that I found to be longer than what I like. I guess I'm gonna have to do some more shooting with this short little guy and see if I can do a little better. I am finding it to be challenging at times. No doubt It shoots better than I'm able to shoot it.
 

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Shooter of flesh
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I just sold my Hoyt Kobalt with 28 ATA and I'm waiting on my Maxxis 35. The Kobalt was my very first bow and I really didn't know there was a difference in bows. DUH, THERE IS!!! Now, I've only been shooting for a little over three months, but I've been shooting a few hundred arrows almost everyday and shoot in two leagues now...so take what I say with the grain of salt. The Kobalt was the only bow I shot for the first two months, I never even tried anyone's bow until one day when I was given a Katera to shoot and then later that day the Hoyt rep showed up and I shot all the bows he brought with him...what a revelation!

The Kobalt magnifies any problems with your form, and I had plenty! The bow was so light and so short that it was very difficult to hold steady. That's not to say that a competent shooter can't shoot it well, but the bow does not help you out in any way. I can see how going from a long ATA bow to a short one would be a problem though. In a sense I'm glad that I started with the Kobalt as it did not hide any errors in my form and everyone could see what I was doing wrong (and they tried to help me out). This at least gave me a chance to quickly understand the problems one can have with shooting properly and at try to correct them.

After selling the Kobalt, my friend loaned me his AM 32, and after setting up for me that afternoon, I shot it that evening in a league and improved my score by 8 points (I'm not very good...yet).

Now if that Maxxis would hurry up and get here!
 

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Real helos, have 2 rotors
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When it comes to shorter bows, being more "finicky", I blame the increased amount of lateral nock travel, due to the increased severity of cam lean, that occurs from brace to full draw.

It is true that a longer bow has more inherent stability, but I don't believe that two inches of ATA, makes very much difference. Especially, if you use a stabilizer to correct for it.

A short bow, has to have big cams, with higher deflection limbs and higher cable loads. In addition, the angle of cable deflection at the cable guard, has to be steeper in order to achieve the same amount of fletching clearance.
 

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Anti Fanboy
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Discussion Starter #10
When it comes to shorter bows, being more "finicky", I blame the increased amount of lateral nock travel, due to the increased severity of cam lean, that occurs from brace to full draw.

It is true that a longer bow has more inherent stability, but I don't believe that two inches of ATA, makes very much difference. Especially, if you use a stabilizer to correct for it.

A short bow, has to have big cams, with higher deflection limbs and higher cable loads. In addition, the angle of cable deflection at the cable guard, has to be steeper in order to achieve the same amount of fletching clearance.
I understand what you are saying here. I went from a 33.25" to a 31.5" bow and have found it a bit challenging. I just came in from out shooting. I installed a heavier stab on shorty and it helped a bunch. Now my fliers are vertical instead of windage. I think I may be pulling up on the bow when I release. Things just seem very different in feel between the two bows. Yet I have another bow with a 32.5" A to A and shoot it well? Go figure.
 

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Real helos, have 2 rotors
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I understand what you are saying here. I went from a 33.25" to a 31.5" bow and have found it a bit challenging. I just came in from out shooting. I installed a heavier stab on shorty and it helped a bunch. Now my fliers are vertical instead of windage. I think I may be pulling up on the bow when I release. Things just seem very different in feel between the two bows. Yet I have another bow with a 32.5" A to A and shoot it well? Go figure.
You may have vertical nock travel. One thing that I like about dual cams, is that it is pretty obvious when your cams are out of sync, because you will notice a double bump at the end of the draw, instead of just hitting the "wall".

A binary, or hybrid cam system, still needs to have the cams synchronized, in order to have level nock travel, however they won't "tell" you by feel, if they are out of sync.

Most single cams have vertical nock travel that can't be eliminated, no matter what you do. Others are capable of it, but only if the cam is timed to a specific position, with the brace height and ATA set to specs.
 

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Anti Fanboy
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Discussion Starter #12
You may have vertical nock travel. One thing that I like about dual cams, is that it is pretty obvious when your cams are out of sync, because you will notice a double bump at the end of the draw, instead of just hitting the "wall".

A binary, or hybrid cam system, still needs to have the cams synchronized, in order to have level nock travel, however they won't "tell" you by feel, if they are out of sync.

Most single cams have vertical nock travel that can't be eliminated, no matter what you do. Others are capable of it, but only if the cam is timed to a specific position, with the brace height and ATA set to specs.
I have checked the cam timing and to the best I can tell they are right on. Speeds seem to be in line with others now as well. Yesterday evening I was searching for solutions and I changed my DL 1/2" longer, 28" the way it should be. I also turned up my DW a couple of pounds. I shot much better for whatever reason. Last week I had to go down 1/2" on my DL to group, go figure. Most likely a form breakdown on my behalf. Going back out to try again shortly.

Thanks.
 
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