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yesterday i changed my draw weight from 55 to 62. At first it was fine, i shot about 6-7 arrows, then today i prolly shot about 12 arrows and my arm is so worn out i cant even draw my bow back. Should i just leave it where its at and just let my arm get stronger or lower down a bit more
 

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Definetly lower it back. But if you want to shoot more poundage, go up maybe a pound or two a week depending on how it feels.
 

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How to tell if you can comfortably use the weight: SIT in a treestand. Position your bow under a limb (or act like you have to) and draw at a target 10 yards away. You're body will be so crooked and out of whack and you can't use your whole body to pull the bow back. If you really want to shoot higher go for it, the bow muscles build fast. If you're going hunting though I'd probably leave it where it's at. 55 is enough anyway. Then raise it after the season.
 

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going from 55lbs to 62lbs is quite a bit of difference with a bow, only thing i can say is if u truly want more poundage take it down to 60 and just practice to get use to it, then u can go up in lbs from there.
 

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I disagree with the majority. If you want to be able to shoot at 62lbs. consistently, then you need to spend some time in the off season working out with your bow. It sounds funny but it works. Set your bow above 62 by a couple of pounds if you can. If 62 is max, then use that weight, but what you do is concentrate on a smooth, slow, strong draw and pull that thing back as many times as you can without flawing your draw for three sets about three times a week. Before you know it, you will be a machine.
 

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sgs said:
I disagree with the majority. If you want to be able to shoot at 62lbs. consistently, then you need to spend some time in the off season working out with your bow. It sounds funny but it works. Set your bow above 62 by a couple of pounds if you can. If 62 is max, then use that weight, but what you do is concentrate on a smooth, slow, strong draw and pull that thing back as many times as you can without flawing your draw for three sets about three times a week. Before you know it, you will be a machine.
I agree if you wanted to shoot a heavier draw weight you should of turned your weight up months ago so that your back muscle have a chance to build up.
 

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I'd go back down to 55#, at least for this fall. If you want to shoot more weight, do what has already been posted, start after this season is over and work your way up. You will be good to go by next year. The best way to increase your bow pulling strength is also the best way to increase your general strength...join a gym and hit the weights. :wink:

I'm 5'11" and 210, been running and lifting for 25+ years and while I could easily shoot a heavier bow I keep mine around 55# year round. Plenty for what I hunt, especially in cold weather, and much more enjoyable to shoot.:)
 

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I disagree with everyone...

1. You up it 8#, and 12 arrows later you are warn to a tee.
2. You are in a controlled situation with no clothing on for warmth.

I would highly suggest dropping your bow to 50# MAX!

55 is WAY TO HIGH for you, if 8# is going to make you a noodle.

It sounds to me, you are a newcomer, with a brand new bow, wanting to go deer hunting, and someone said "Pull as much as you can and practice until season".

Now its season, and you want more Umph, but lack the archery muscles to accomplish the task... by a great degree.

55# sounds STILL heavy for you to some degree, but doable.

Drop it to 50 pounds...sight it in for 50, and hunt with 50.

Dwayne
 
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