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Discussion Starter #1
I have a hoyt charger with a hit man 5 pin micro ripcord SOS and a shock eater carbon stab...I'm thinking of taking the traditional plunge.. Mind you I've never even shot a trad bow. I just respect it soooo much..if you say go for it what bows do u recommend?
 

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I wouldn't get rid of it until you try a trad bow. Maybe purchase an inexpensive trad bow to get going and try it out. Something like a Samick Sage or a Polaris. Some sort of basic bow.

It can be easy to fall in love with trad, I would respectfully suggest trying trad before you take the plunge and get rid of your Hoyt.
 

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I have a hoyt charger with a hit man 5 pin micro ripcord SOS and a shock eater carbon stab...I'm thinking of taking the traditional plunge.. Mind you I've never even shot a trad bow. I just respect it soooo much..if you say go for it what bows do u recommend?
That's a mouthful :) seriously give it a try. Find something inexpensive and a light draw weight.

Sent from my SGH-T679 using Tapatalk 2
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That's a great link for that elcheapo long bow..I think I might order one. I wish I was closer to the cities then id drive over tomorrow lol to shoot your bow..I've owned a compound since this summer and love it. I'm just failing to see a real challenge in the hunting aspect of it.
 

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Traditional shooting has change A LOT in me. From not just having the urge of shooting something but to actually go out and see all the things I was not paying attention.

I found out my self getting excited not just because I was getting all my arrows in the center but because I was actually a part of the shot, I was just another part of my bow.

Give it a try its nothing more exciting than looking at where you want to place your arrow and by some un explicable reason the arrow flies and hits that exact spot.

As far equipment I'm not an expert but I can tell you by experience DO NOT get a more than 45 #. I learn the hard way.
 

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Being both a firearm and bow hunter, using a compound bow already ups the challenge level by a lot, in my opinion.

If you know you will be in the northern metro area sometime, let me know. I regularly shoot at Average Joe's Archery in **** Rapids.
 

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I did not get rid of my wheel bow but I have bought two traditional bows and am absolutely loving it. I went to Baltimore Bowmans 3 day Traditional shoot last year and got hooked. It is so much more challenging all the way around. Instinctive shooting, having to get closer, and all the techniques that go into being a good shooter. It is pretty cheap to get started also. Bought an old Bear recurve at a garage sale, grabbed some old arrows from the self and tab and on I went. Go for it.
 

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I echo J-san If you are up north, I live in Grand Rapids and have lots of long bows and recurves you can shoot. Really recommend that you try before you buy. Also, the big trad shoot is in **** Rapids on Father's day another time and place to shoot some before making the plunge.

Arne
 

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I did exactly what you're debating doing. I'd always wanted to shoot trad. Took a few shots of someone elses longbow at my local archery club. I knew I liked it, so I sold my Hoyt Trykon, and all the gear with it. Got a longbow hybrid and after a year I've regretted it yet. Even after watching 3 deer walk that use to be within my range.
For me there is something that feels so much more natural about shooting my trad bow than the compound did. I feel a new kind of freedom, not worrying about bumping my fiber optic pin or knocking my cam into a rock or whatever. I love just roaming through the field behind my house picking out leaves or sticks and flinging arrows.
I admit, after a year I still can't come close to competing with my buddies and their compounds, but the freedom and fun of a trad bow is worth it to me.
 

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The above commentaries are excellent advice. Listen to it seriously, please.

Here's my take that you should completely ignore (really ... ignore me). However, I am compelled to speak thusly:

You wouldn't have opened this thread if you weren't already mentally committed to make the switch.

If money is the issue, then yes, dump the compound and get a longbow. A long one. Go for it. Take the plunge. Make sure the draw weight is sufficiently light to shoot dozens of arrows daily with good form and control. Observe the inexpensive longbows at Lancaster Archery's website for examples to study. Read some longbow picture threads to get an idea of the various styles. Your gut will begin to react to what you desire.

If money is not the issue, then keep the compound and get a longbow. A long one. Go for it. Take the plunge. Make sure the ...

While at Lancaster's site, order the book "Shooting the Stickbow" by Anthony Camera. Absent a teacher, it is a wonderful tutorial on recurve and longbow shooting from the ground up and covers every aspect of shooting that you will need to know to get a successful start. Form and equipment are covered in great detail. Between that book and this forum, you'll have every question answered immediately as you begin shooting.

I'm adamant. Get a longbow now. Appropriate weight. Read book. Lot's of practice. Enjoy life.

Good luck.
 

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Thin Man has good points. If you can afford it, consider ILF equipment as it is more versatile than one piece bows and allows you to easily upgrade your limbs as well as retain good resale value. I like the aesthetics of one piece wood bows, but find the adjustability of ILF to far outweigh the lack of visual appeal.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
question for you trad shooters ? What's with all these leather grips? I do a lot of fine wood working so I don't understand Y they would cover up the most beautiful part of a long bow with a less then cheesy hunk of leather!!!##
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Also ...I kinda hate td bows
..well the look any way. But my question is everyone seems to agree on or about 45 pounds for starting out but is that a good hunting poundage?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If the answer is no then I could see Y buying an interchangeable limb bow would have its benefits ...but then again if I do this I want to do it right by my standards any way...traditional ...I don't but a old model Y and put an f150 grill on it lol mind you this is just my view on traditional ..each his own so no offense to someone with a td bow ..
 

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Lots of great advice here. When I made the switch a year ago I sold 3 of my compounds ( they sure don't hold their value) and used the money to buy a new recurve. I still have my $1100 Hoyt carbon Matrix that I haven't shot in a year. I have no plans on selling it ( not sure why) but I have no plans on shooting it either :shade:. This whole " traditional thing" has been a love- hate relationship. I LOVE LOVE shooting my recurve but I am just not happy with my slow progress. I will get there.......someday!!

I recommend keeping your compound just in case traditional isn't your thing. Be patient and give it a try. Enjoy the ride
 

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I have a hoyt charger with a hit man 5 pin micro ripcord SOS and a shock eater carbon stab...I'm thinking of taking the traditional plunge.. Mind you I've never even shot a trad bow. I just respect it soooo much..if you say go for it what bows do u recommend?
Your bow is still worth a fair amount since it's relatively new. Being a Hoyt, I assume it's also a very nice bow (I have an UltraElite). Looking at recent classified adds a mint Charger's going for $500-$600, figure the high end with your sight and stabilizer. This time next year you can knock another 1/3 off that, two years and you'll be looking at half. It's disappointing how fast compounds loose their value.

If you sold your compound and bought a used recurve or longbow with the money, the stickbow will hold it's value as long as it isn't abused. A good longbow or recurve doesn't become valueless over time like a compound. Buy a used recurve or longbow and ten years later (or 20 years or 30 years...) you should be able to sell it for what you paid for it (assuming it is in similar condition). The right bow might even gain in value if the bowyer retires or it's a special edition. For what you could sell your compound for you could get many of the premier custom recurves or longbow used in the classifieds. The problem is you don't know what you like, who is making the "premier" bows, or even if you would like a stickbow. The world of custom bows is wide and deep, and you will only learn about them on the 'net, in traditional magazines, or at traditional shoots.

If you are willing to put in some time to reading on the threads as to what bows are well respected and in demand, figure out what appeals to you, and have the patience to watch the classifieds for the right bow, you could turn your soon to be almost worthless compound into something that will hold it's value almost indefinitely or is easy to resell if you find you don't really like stickbows.

Sell your bow and buy the first brand new "entry level" recurve or longbow you see, find out you don't like traditional bows (long and steep learning curve for most), you are then out a nice compound and stuck with an entry level bow that is now worth 2/3 what you paid for it...and not easy to find a buyer for.

If you give up your compound, make sure you get a recurve or longbow of similar quality in return...it's not as easy as just buying something out of a catalog and it's unlikely your local shop will have it.

There's no right answer. I know every time I've done something as whole-hog as you are thinking I've come to regret it in time. The safest thing you could do is keep your compound, save up for a few weeks or months while you research bows, and buy a good, but inexpensive stickbow to try...used if possible.

Just my opinion and probably worth everything you paid for it...:wink:
 

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Just because you want to try traditional does not mean you have to get rid of your compound. I use both all the time. They both have their advantages. Samick makes some nice longbows for not a lot of money. Good luck and have fun
 
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