Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
im fairly new to the sport and i think its the only thing keeping me sane since ive been laid off i shoot vegas 450 indoor and would like to improve my acuracy my arrows are easton x7 eclipse 2114 4 in. plastiflech at a 2 degree offset my question is would it make any difference if i stripped them down and water balanced them the determine the cock feather

please ill be asking alot more advice on archery
thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,653 Posts
Probably won't make any difference, especially on an X7. You can get similar results by numbering your arrows and then paying close attention to where those arrows impact/group on the target. I don't mean literally shoot all the arrows at a single spot to see how they group. Rather, on the Vegas face shoot the same numbered arrow at the same numbered Vegas spot and after several ends observe if one of the arrows is hitting a different part of the spot compared to the others. If so, try that arrow at one of the other Vegas spots for a few ends and observe if it is still hitting offcenter similar to before changing up the order. If yes, then rotate the nock to orient a different feather to be the cock feather and repeat. Usually you should be able to get an errant arrow to group as well as the rest just by turning the nock, provided the arrow is not bent. Generally I can rotate my nocks to orient any of the 3 feathers/vanes on an Easton X7 and have them hit consistently in the center, but there are an occasional couple out of a dozen where the nock alignment does make a difference.

Hope that helps. "Floating" an arrow supposedly does the same thing, i.e. provide a consistent point to orient the cock feather. I would contend though from what I've seen that the X7's are pretty consistent in spine around the circumference of the shaft already. Some feel its just as easy, and as consistent, to locate the seam on the aluminum arrows and fletch the cock feather oriented to this point as that also seems to be the side that gets identified in the float tests.

I prefer to just shoot the arrows in and tune the nocks personally. End results are the same -- arrows match and hit the center -- and is pretty much fool proof. Plus I get to practice shooting while doing so rather than spending time hovering over the bathtub, lol :D!

>>-------->
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
ty

Thank you very much for the feed back im going to the club tonight im going to concentrate on wat u told me my only problem is i only have 3 arrows left so i want then to be as acurate as possible i got laid off 2 months ago so archery is my therapy if u know anyone with some used x7 eclipse 2114 31inches or better at a reasonable price im all ears
thanks again:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,174 Posts
Probably won't make any difference, especially on an X7. You can get similar results by numbering your arrows and then paying close attention to where those arrows impact/group on the target. I don't mean literally shoot all the arrows at a single spot to see how they group. Rather, on the Vegas face shoot the same numbered arrow at the same numbered Vegas spot and after several ends observe if one of the arrows is hitting a different part of the spot compared to the others. If so, try that arrow at one of the other Vegas spots for a few ends and observe if it is still hitting offcenter similar to before changing up the order. If yes, then rotate the nock to orient a different feather to be the cock feather and repeat. Usually you should be able to get an errant arrow to group as well as the rest just by turning the nock, provided the arrow is not bent. Generally I can rotate my nocks to orient any of the 3 feathers/vanes on an Easton X7 and have them hit consistently in the center, but there are an occasional couple out of a dozen where the nock alignment does make a difference.

Hope that helps. "Floating" an arrow supposedly does the same thing, i.e. provide a consistent point to orient the cock feather. I would contend though from what I've seen that the X7's are pretty consistent in spine around the circumference of the shaft already. Some feel its just as easy, and as consistent, to locate the seam on the aluminum arrows and fletch the cock feather oriented to this point as that also seems to be the side that gets identified in the float tests.

I prefer to just shoot the arrows in and tune the nocks personally. End results are the same -- arrows match and hit the center -- and is pretty much fool proof. Plus I get to practice shooting while doing so rather than spending time hovering over the bathtub, lol :D!

>>-------->
Nock rotation being IDENTICAL on ALL the arrows in a set is one thing that is overlooked so often, I cannot believe it. Now, with the advent of the fallaway arrow rests, I hear people say more and more than "nock rotation and alignment" is meaningless and a waste of time. I quietly thank them for those missed x-s that help me to get a nudge closer to them in score...and that keeps them out of the winner's circle.

Of course, after having shot a springie rest for years and launcher blade rests....we KNOW the importance of EXACT nock rotation on each arrow and also about the couple out of a set that for whatever reason won't fly the same as the others. I used to "group test" my arrows at 65 yards and rotate the vanes, reset the nock alignment, and try to solve the issue that way. Sometimes that gained me the arrow back into the "mold" and sometimes the arrow was chucked...or became a "BUNNY TARGET ONLY" arrow if it wasn't too far out of the group, that is.

I've found the same thing with carbon arrows too....just sometimes an arrow won't stay the line; often times, rotating the nock to the next vane or feather and realigning it works; other times it doesn't.

I NEVER change the "order" of the target sequence I shoot on either the 5-spot or the Vegas face, but I do ALWAYS number my arrows and the #2 arrow is ALWAYS shot at the #2 spot, etc. Then, at the conclusion of the round...the holes speak for themselves. Take a picture of the target and shoot a few more rounds...and you get an even better picture of what arrow is impacting where and how YOU are affecting the impact point of the arrow or particular spot. It is amazing about the little nuances of how you tend to shoot one "spot" in a particular position, and yet another into some other position...and how it changes from day to day and round to round.

Part of learning about yourself and our tendencies and the tendencies of your equipment. One more part concerning "ProActive Archery".

field14
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top