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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,
I just picked up a Scott Ascent Hinge to alleviate some target panic. I didn't realize how bad it was until I started trying to use the hinge. The good news is that I haven't punched myself in the face yet. I've got about 50-60 shots through it, and my draw shoulder feels terrible after only 1-day of shooting. I've been shooting about the same duration every other day with my thumb-puncher (scott pursuit) w/o any pain. I'm wondering if it's because I'm drawing extra judiciously, or if it's because my shot sequence is significantly longer than normal. I haven't made any adjustments to the release, as it seems fine at the preset settings. Has anyone experienced anything similar? I'm shooting a '19 PSE Stealth Carbon Air at 70lbs @ 90% let-off. Thanks!
-Sam
 

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I had problem with shoulder pain too. Unfortunately I gave up in the hinge and stayed with the thumb. I still use the same process as the hinge with less issue.


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I had problem with shoulder pain too. Unfortunately I gave up in the hinge and stayed with the thumb. I still use the same process as the hinge with less issue.


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Awe man....how long did you try to stay with it?
 

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Hello All,
I just picked up a Scott Ascent Hinge to alleviate some target panic. I didn't realize how bad it was until I started trying to use the hinge. The good news is that I haven't punched myself in the face yet. I've got about 50-60 shots through it, and my draw shoulder feels terrible after only 1-day of shooting. I've been shooting about the same duration every other day with my thumb-puncher (scott pursuit) w/o any pain. I'm wondering if it's because I'm drawing extra judiciously, or if it's because my shot sequence is significantly longer than normal. I haven't made any adjustments to the release, as it seems fine at the preset settings. Has anyone experienced anything similar? I'm shooting a '19 PSE Stealth Carbon Air at 70lbs @ 90% let-off. Thanks!
-Sam


Was your target panic a matter of punching the trigger on the thumb? Wonder if you are actually pulling harder into the wall with the hinge. May also be a shoulder alignment issue; are the lengths of the necks the same on both releases? Also, if you are getting a surprise release with the hinge, but weren't with the thumb, you could have been anticipating and bracing before but now the shot is slamming the shoulder joint awkwardly within the joint cavity.

Another possible issue could be that your "back tension" may actually be pulling from the shoulder and not truly from the back.

Although he's talking about a recurve, I found this YT of interest...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nr3F96kqv9k
 

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Hello All,
I just picked up a Scott Ascent Hinge to alleviate some target panic. I didn't realize how bad it was until I started trying to use the hinge. The good news is that I haven't punched myself in the face yet. I've got about 50-60 shots through it, and my draw shoulder feels terrible after only 1-day of shooting. I've been shooting about the same duration every other day with my thumb-puncher (scott pursuit) w/o any pain. I'm wondering if it's because I'm drawing extra judiciously, or if it's because my shot sequence is significantly longer than normal. I haven't made any adjustments to the release, as it seems fine at the preset settings. Has anyone experienced anything similar? I'm shooting a '19 PSE Stealth Carbon Air at 70lbs @ 90% let-off. Thanks!
-Sam
First off, years ago I was instructed by Doug Springer of Stanislawski to drop draw weight when going with a hinge. After getting use to and getting the hinge set then increase draw weight. Personally, I don't think anyone needs 70 pounds for anything and especially so with a hinge.

Second, you're learning a different manner of firing and this weighs on you and your shoulder.

Kelly hit on some goods points. Having the hinge set too cold doesn't help. Pulling too hard into wall doesn't help. If the release is too short you could be "pulling" into the shoulder instead of the shoulder being what it should be and that being the pivot point.

Of limb stop bows one has to learn the "wall" and said manipulation is better used. Back tension is only used to hold to full draw....

I haven't ran into a release being too short except when I had my bow set for my longest hook up hinge, a Tru-Fire Sear. The Sear is right at .400" longer than my Stan Shootoff. My Sears set aside I can go with 1/2" longer draw modules and tweak the d-loop for "fit."
 

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Awe man....how long did you try to stay with it?
About 3 months couldn’t stand it any more. Never seemed to get better. I shoot consistently better with a thumb than I ever did with the wrist. Good luck.


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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you Kelly & Sonny. I think the Ascent hinge might be a 1/4” shorter than my thumb button release. I was punching my thumb button before, but can now manage surprise shots after using the hinge. I think I’ll start with lowering the poundage of my bow and taking to heart some of the lessons from the video.
-Sam


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when i was having pain in my draw shoulder it was because i did not have good bone alignment and i had my elbow somewhat bent during the drawing cycle. correct form and keeping the bow arm elbow straight took care of that for me. make sure you are focusing on pulling with the back muscles, i always thought that wouldn't make a difference but it really does
 

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I've watched tons of people try a hinge for the first time and even though I always would set it plenty cold so that they wouldn't have a premature release, they all did one thing. They all draw the bow primarily with their bicep and then try to contort their shoulder/arm to find some sort of anchor. They did that because they were afraid of punching themselves in the face and they were doing whatever they could to not rotate the release. Ironically, the only way to punch yourself in the face while drawing a bow is if you're using your bicep and just bending your elbow. If you use your back muscles primarily, your hand will pass outside your face and you won't punch yourself.

I have the same hinge as you and have it set so that I have nearly equal pressure on all 3 fingers when I get to the click (I have all my hinge releases set this way actually). I don't even use the thumb peg to draw the bow because I know that as long as there's even slightly more pressure on my index finger, there's no way to go past the moon and fire the release. This allows me to stay very relaxed while drawing and at full draw, I can essentially pull straight back and the slight additional load on the index finger will cause it to stretch enough to fire the release without having to think about rotating it. Knowing how my release came set from the factory, I'd guess that you'd benefit from setting it colder.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I've watched tons of people try a hinge for the first time and even though I always would set it plenty cold so that they wouldn't have a premature release, they all did one thing. They all draw the bow primarily with their bicep and then try to contort their shoulder/arm to find some sort of anchor. They did that because they were afraid of punching themselves in the face and they were doing whatever they could to not rotate the release. Ironically, the only way to punch yourself in the face while drawing a bow is if you're using your bicep and just bending your elbow. If you use your back muscles primarily, your hand will pass outside your face and you won't punch yourself.

I have the same hinge as you and have it set so that I have nearly equal pressure on all 3 fingers when I get to the click (I have all my hinge releases set this way actually). I don't even use the thumb peg to draw the bow because I know that as long as there's even slightly more pressure on my index finger, there's no way to go past the moon and fire the release. This allows me to stay very relaxed while drawing and at full draw, I can essentially pull straight back and the slight additional load on the index finger will cause it to stretch enough to fire the release without having to think about rotating it. Knowing how my release came set from the factory, I'd guess that you'd benefit from setting it colder.
Is there any chance that I could get a photo of your clicker and release moon settings? That sounds like it would be ideal. As Dbolick said, I am 99% certain that I maybe contorting my elbow so as to not punch myself in the face. I shot yesterday and the pain was still there, albeit not as bad an previous days. Thanks all!
 

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Is there any chance that I could get a photo of your clicker and release moon settings? That sounds like it would be ideal. As Dbolick said, I am 99% certain that I maybe contorting my elbow so as to not punch myself in the face. I shot yesterday and the pain was still there, albeit not as bad an previous days. Thanks all!
Unless your fingers and hand are the exact same proportions as mine, my settings won't do much good. I initially set mine by hooking some loop material to a solid structure and pulling on it with my wrist and forearm totally relaxed and with equal pressure on my fingers. I then moved the click to go off just before equal pressure and set the moon to fire right at it. That way when I add any extra pressure on the index finger and it elongates, that's enough rotation to fire the release.
 

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Is there any chance that I could get a photo of your clicker and release moon settings? That sounds like it would be ideal. As Dbolick said, I am 99% certain that I maybe contorting my elbow so as to not punch myself in the face. I shot yesterday and the pain was still there, albeit not as bad an previous days. Thanks all!
Like above hands make a difference. Only muscles to use are the back muscles. I think nuts&bolts told of student who didn't have bicep muscles and easily drew his bow.

I don't use a click sear.

I draw on target, but away from my face. At full draw I bring my release hand to my face to anchor.

Like Huntinsker, my hinge is set so just my index finger needs a bit of pressure to keep from firing. On target, anchored I let the handle equalize across my index, middle and ring finger. Hold there forever - well, until tired and not fire the hinge. What most seem to tell of, they get the click with the handle equalizing across the fingers.

Old write up by Padgett;
SQUEEZE AND PULL FIRING ENGINE
1. Come to anchor and settle in checking bubble and peep alignment and then release the thumb pressure on the peg slowly.
2. Now at the same time I start aiming I start squeezing my ring and middle finger and smoothly pull into the wall.
3. Arrow gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks, I shot about 50 arrows today w/o pain. Shooting w/o the clicker seemed to help for some strange reason. Also, I think drawing normally helped as well.


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