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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious to see what some of you more experienced folks think.

I've just taken up to archery/hunting within the past 3 weeks. Picked up a nice Hoyt Xtec that is set at 66# with a 28" draw. I'm 36, 5'11" and 203 and I'd like to think that I'm in rather good health. Get to the gym about 4 times a week with a mix of cardio along with weights and play an hours worth of flag football once a week.

The problem that I'm having is with my left shoulder (bow hand). Everytime I get to practice shooting I start to develop pain in my shoulder. Not so much in the shoulder but deeper. At first I was thinking that my body just needs to get use to this new motion at this weight but even while in the gym and doing work on my shoulders I've never had issues like this but then again, I'm not doing any type of routine in the gym that is like pulling back a bow.

After shooting some Wednesday with my brother in law it all hit me and I remembered that I have done some damage to this shoulder area before. Not once but 3 different times. In the 8th grade I had broken my collar bone in wrestling practice, the following year in the 9th grade did some ligament/tendon damage also while wrestling and then some years later in my 20's discovered that I had broken the same collar bone again and since we were not sure when it happened and it showed no signs of healing the doctor decided to take the broken bone out so now my left collar bone is actually shorter but now, unlike when I first started shooting the pain only lasts for a little while and not into the next day like it was when I just started to shoot. Like now, my last shot today was at about 3:30 and my shoulder feels fine. It was actually feeling better about 2 hours after my last shot.

So I'm wondering, do you guys think that I should just keep on and it's just a "getting use to it" type of deal or something that I might need to get looked at or maybe even lower the draw weight and go from there.

Thanks for any input!
 

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I don't know much about the particular bow you have or compounds in general. What I do know is that drawing a bow whether compound or traditional uses muscles that are normaly not heavily used. I suspect that you may very well be over-bowed for just starting out. A good test to use to find if you are over-bowed is to put the bow at your side, pointed toward your foot and attempt to draw the bow to your anchor point. At least that's what Mr. Fred Asbell of the traditional bowmen says.
 

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Welcome to archery. Like you, I have sports related shoulder injuries, partial rotator cuff tears in both shoulders as well as a broken collar bone. i opted not to have surgery on the tears and took the route of muscle strengthening in that region and back. That was many years ago and at 59 I can still shoot my bows at around 65#. I do get a bit of pain, particularly in the left shoulder region, but fortunately only in the first couple of shots of the day, particularly if I didn't do some stretches first. It's obviously worse in a hunting scenario when it's cold.

Probably the most important thing to focus on in archery is correct form. Correct form will greatly minimise the possibility of injury. Like many sports, if you start out wrong, you can cause yourself physical damage. A quick search on AT regarding shoulder surgery will reveal quite a bit of information on this subject.

I don't know if you have had any professional archery coaching, if not i think it would be a good move. Also, googling 'correct archery form' and similar, will produce lots of good advice and Of course there's a mountain of knowledgable archers right here on AT.

Archery is a great sport and a great way to hunt, i wish you all the best.
 

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Turn ur bow weight down,,,,1stttttttttttt,,,,,,55lbs
then limit your arrows ur practice on each session...2nddddd
3rd,,,,,do more stretching exercises then weight lifting......:wink:


MOST OF ALL<<<<HAVE DAYS OF REST IN BETWEEN<<<
 

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turn the bow down

i would turn your bow down and see if that helps i didnt have shoulder problems in the past but when i first started shooting agin after a few yrs off i had the same problem as you are haveing i turned the bow down and after a couple week problem solved
 

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sometimes just a few pounds makes a lot of difference ,take 3 out a see how it feels , specific exercises will help also , shrugs , raises . curls reverse curls , pullups pushups flys , 3 weeks is not alot of time for your muscles to get used to a new sport
 

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Just a lil to add . Try to limit amount of arrows you shoot each time. Rather than blasting 12 arrows straight, limit yourself to 3 shots in a group , then take a walk to retrieve. Eventually you will "work" yourself into shooting more and more . Take it slow .

Good luck
 

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I used to have the soar left shoulder too until I got professional coaching. If you'd like to get the coaching you can but i'll save ya some time. Pull back, stand straight as a bean stalk, get comfortable, relax you're shoulders, find your spot and squeeze your back muscles until your bow releases. Don't punch the trigger, push and pull the trigger. With the correct back tension you will save yourself a lot of wear and tear on the shoulder. For a more complete version on how to keep your shoulders fresh while shooting, visit your local archery shop for professional consultation. -- Michigan Mark
 

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put it on 45-50 shoot for a while build all the stabilizer muscles up and then slowly build it up if you choose! I had a major surg about 3 yrs agao and took her down to 49 now I am on 60 and thats as high as you will ever see me go!
 

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You may have bone spurs from the old injury. If it doesn't clear up soon have a doctor look at it so it doesn't possibly cause more damage.
RG
 

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I noticed when I started shooting a bow with a 1/2" shorter draw length I started to get an aching bow arm shoulder. Have you tried a 1/2" longer draw?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I haven't tried a shorter or longer dl yet but I'm gonna run by my local shop tomorrow and get the weight turned down a bit for now.
 

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Welcome to the world of archery addiction...I am with others and say turn it down and do less to start..shoot 6 arrows at a time a couple times a day and then go to 3 times a day..give the limb bolts 1 turn after a week and keep the same routine...trying to shoot 24 arrows at a time may be way to much to start with for you....and when your at the archery shop pick up a set of allen wrench's and have him show you how to turn your weight up or down...learn how to work on your bow yourself..its not hard to do and for a few dollars you can do it at home...JMO
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Yeah Birdman, that's always been the way I am with anything that I do. I like to take the time to learn about everthing I get involved in so that I actually know how to do these things myself.

Just by reading these forums I've already learned so much, acutally installed a string stop (not the hard part) the other day and served the line (hard part) myself. Also was able to correct my grip and stop the string slap that I was getting on the first day that I got to shooting my bow and this was prior to installing the string stop.

Again, thanks for all the helpful info so far folks!
 

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Well, I'm headed for "60". I've been on a continuous workout regimen with weights, and machines, since I was 15. I also still train 4-5 days most weeks. Guess what, I'm just back from a layoff of three months from shoveling snow/tennis elbow. "Sucks" would be a polite description.

Well, all the muscles you trained up with weights, have only a little to do with shooting your bow. Some guys are lucky enough to be able to shoot a 28 target Field round with a 66lb bow, most, not. I shot 70+lb bows for 30 years, now I shoot 60lb bows, max, and I rarely shoot 4dz arrows at a time from them.

Get a lighter rig, shoot it a lot, and in time, you may get back to 200 arrows with a 66lb bow. Or, maybe not.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the great info folks, looks like it was just an issue of turning the weight down some.

Collected all the info on my bow since it didn't come with any and figured out the proper way to turn the weight down. Got it set to about 63#'s now and went out and did some shooting with it today. Unlike when it was set to 66 there was no pain at all during or even when I was done.

thanks everyone!
 

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Thanks for all the great info folks, looks like it was just an issue of turning the weight down some.

Collected all the info on my bow since it didn't come with any and figured out the proper way to turn the weight down. Got it set to about 63#'s now and went out and did some shooting with it today. Unlike when it was set to 66 there was no pain at all during or even when I was done.

thanks everyone!
turn it down more,to 60,,u will be surprized how much better u will shoot and feel..
 
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