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Discussion Starter #1
Curious if there is a optimal distance your sight should be from the riser. I have a CBE tek hybrid with the smart mount and I recently ordered a third axis adjustment for it. I’m certain that when I install this feature it will increase my overall length of the sight. Right now my sight distance measures 6-1/4” from the front of the riser to the pin. Not certain of the dynamics of it being closer or further away also so any help is much appreciated.
 

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There's nothing magical about the sight distance, it's just personal preference and maintaining a certain relationship between the peep aperture and scope housing. The farther out you extend the front sight, the smaller the housing will become in relation to the "hole" in your peep sight. An inch or so is pretty insignificant IMO, so adding the 3rd axis may or may not affect your sight picture. Also, if you're using a lens, the farther the sight is extended, the greater the magnification (again though, 1" change is pretty insignificant)
Mostly by coincidence, the distance from my sight to my peep at full draw is usually within about 1" of my draw length.
 

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Theoretically, a longer sight radius has the possibility of being more precise. I personally mount all my sights as far out as possible, but I don't shoot for a specific distance away from the riser. Just make sure your peep is the right size and lines up how you want.
 

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The farther out it is...the more effect just a slight bit of riser torque will have. I was pulling my hair out trying to figure out why I was getting left/right errors and turned out having the sight all the way out on a 9" bar was killing me.
Moved it in and problem solved.
 

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The farther out it is...the more effect just a slight bit of riser torque will have. I was pulling my hair out trying to figure out why I was getting left/right errors and turned out having the sight all the way out on a 9" bar was killing me.
Moved it in and problem solved.
Good point. This generally outweighs the advantage of a longer sight radius.
 

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You can probably search thru Dudley’s you tube videos of his podcast where he talks about the previous mentioned riser torque and sight position.


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Discussion Starter #7
Wow didn’t figure there was that much to take into consideration. Thanks guys for all the info. I think I’ll have to move to a smaller diameter peep. I’m using a 1/4” and there’s some space around the perimeter of the sight housing. I guess a rule of thumb would be the further your sight the smaller the peep correct?
 

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To add another variable to the equation and further complicate things, the distance you run your sight out front also dictates, in part, to the sight tape you need to use.

The space between your yardage adjustments increases as you move your pin(s) out farther.

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Wow didn’t figure there was that much to take into consideration. Thanks guys for all the info. I think I’ll have to move to a smaller diameter peep. I’m using a 1/4” and there’s some space around the perimeter of the sight housing. I guess a rule of thumb would be the further your sight the smaller the peep correct?
Depending on how close you want to match your peep size, you may be best with a new peep that accents smaller apertures.


Typed with fat fingers on my iPhone with tiny keyboard.
 

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First, if using a lens, is finding the best clarity/view. Scope housing size matters little if having a peep with interchangeable orifices.

Having the pin far out may offer more precise aiming, but gives of unwanted increased pin movement.
 

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The further out the more torque your inducing, close to the riser is best, these aren't gun sights...
 

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Explained pretty good here.

https://youtu.be/IKco7YjQS0Q
Not sure if he dumbed it down for the masses, or whether he really believes what he said, but torque is not reduced by bringing your sight closer to the riser.
Using nice round numbers, if your bow is torquing 1°, that equates to 0.1" at 6 inches and 0.2" at 12 inches, but either way, it's still 1° of torque, and it's the same error at the target either way.
 

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I will give you the same advice that I was given over 50 years ago when I bought my first sight with an extension bar. Move it in or out until you find the length that works the best for you. Very simple and takes very little effort. It is the same as a peep sight. Don't be afraid to move it up or down to find the perfect spot for your anchor and never never ask someone else what is best. Because they believe that what is right for them will be perfect for you.
 

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I will give you the same advice that I was given over 50 years ago when I bought my first sight with an extension bar. Move it in or out until you find the length that works the best for you. Very simple and takes very little effort. It is the same as a peep sight. Don't be afraid to move it up or down to find the perfect spot for your anchor and never never ask someone else what is best. Because they believe that what is right for them will be perfect for you.
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ I like it
 

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Not sure if he dumbed it down for the masses, or whether he really believes what he said, but torque is not reduced by bringing your sight closer to the riser.
Using nice round numbers, if your bow is torquing 1°, that equates to 0.1" at 6 inches and 0.2" at 12 inches, but either way, it's still 1° of torque, and it's the same error at the target either way.
When the bow is torqued, the arrow and sight move in opposite directions. If your numbers are correct and the archer corrects by moving the pin back on target and keeping the torque, moving the bow 0.2" will cause a greater miss than moving it 0.1".
The torque is the same but the archers perception and correction are not.
 

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When the bow is torqued, the arrow and sight move in opposite directions. If your numbers are correct and the archer corrects by moving the pin back on target and keeping the torque, moving the bow 0.2" will cause a greater miss than moving it 0.1".
The torque is the same but the archers perception and correction are not.
Torque is what it is....theres no "moving the pin back". Back to what?
You set the pin so the arrow hits in the middle....whatever torque exists is included in the pin position.

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