Archery Talk Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
New Kid
Joined
·
656 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone explain to me the advantages (if any) of keeping your sight as fully extended (away from you) as possible given the distance? It seems to be conventional wisdom but I haven't found any reason why.

Some background info: I'm currently shooting ~28# OTF and want to set sight marks for field archery out to 80 yards. In order to reach that distance, I have to bring the extension bar as close in as possible and drop the sight block down as low as possible, and even then have to aim at the top of the target. So, for convenience, I decided to just sight in with the extension bar close in, for all distances. This means that for the birdie targets, the sight block is almost near the top, while at 80 yards it's at the bottom. But when I'm just shooting 20 yards or whatever, people look at me funny for having the sight set that way.

I mean, in retrospect it would be possible to keep the sight block somewhere near the middle most of the time, and move the extension rod in and out to adjust for distance and just make smaller vertical adjustments. If there were a concrete reason why doing so would be more advantageous than keeping it fixed fully in, I would give it a try. What is the usual practice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
If the sight is further out, it takes a smaller movement to move it noticeably out of alignment. Do some reading on "sight radius" under the Theory heading here:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_sights

You don't exactly have a rear sight when shooting a typical Oly recurve setup, but the concept still applies.

Plus, if the sight is further out, then one click on your sight is a relatively finer adjustment compared to if you pull your sight closer in, for the same "sight radius" reason.

So what you "should" want to do is set your extension as far out as possible while still being able to shoot the farthest distance you plan to shoot for. Then, no matter the distance, you always set your extension to this same length. This keeps your pin or aperture a consistent visual size and reduces the number of variables to consider when shooting at different or even unknown distances, along with the longer sight radius and finer adjustment advantages above.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,299 Posts
s -

Sight out:

1. You'll see smaller movements in float. For most people that's a bad thing.
2. Aperture is smaller rel to target, good or bad, depending on preference.
3. Lower point of impact across the board (usually a bad thing)
4. Lets you look like the big boys (don't laugh, that's why most people have their sights full out).

Sight in:
1. You'll see fewer/smaller movements in float (and you won't try to over correct your aim, and usually blow your shot,)
2. Aperture is bigger rel to target (see above).
3. Higher point of impact across the board (usually a good thing).
4. Makes people ask why your sight is all the way in.


For indoor shooting, I keep my sight near it's mid position and will usually use changes in extension for temporary changes in elevation. (In my case, 1" of extension = approx 1" of elevation @ 20 yds.)
For outdoor shooting, I go full in to keep my settings as high as possible (max range).
In the "old days" it wasn't uncommon to mount sights on the face of the riser - see above.

Yes, I choose my aperture ID to work with those settings, and it too is bigger than most people use (1/2" ID).

Viper1 out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
If you are far sighted, or wear correct time lenses for distance than having the sight extended will make the aperture/pin clearer.
With the sight extended you may find you are able to shoot inside your float.

Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,006 Posts
Parallax error reduction by approximately 0.14%.

Imagine your sight bar is 70m long. Engaging a 70m target with such a sight allows you to totally disregard your string blurr. That equates to a 100% parallax error reduction.

Your only issue now is deciding between having 1.2% parallax error reduction, or 1.058%.....
 

·
New Kid
Joined
·
656 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Now that puts things into perspective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
Sight out:

3. Lower point of impact across the board (usually a bad thing)

Sight in:

3. Higher point of impact across the board (usually a good thing).
Viper, can you explain?
what cause this?


For indoor shooting, I keep my sight near it's mid position and will usually use changes in extension for temporary changes in elevation. (In my case, 1" of extension = approx 1" of elevation @ 20 yds.)
I am confused on this.
Define "temporary changes in elevation", as in you consistently shooting high or low? or high/low target?


For outdoor shooting, I go full in to keep my settings as high as possible (max range).
I will experiment with that,
only shooting 22 lbs... need my pin to go higher... Point on at 60 yards/shooting split/anchoring with C of my hand at the jaw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,299 Posts
n -

It has to do with the sight radius and angles caused by the distance from your eye to the sight. Rather than me doing into details, sketch it out on paper and you'll see what's happening. Or more importantly try it. I've seen shooters again 1.5" (or more) on their sight racks going from full out to full in.

I have some limbs that don't react well to temp changes and shoot higher when cold than when warmed up. Rather than adjusting the sight settings, I find, moving the sight in or out is a quicker fix. Also, during a match, if I start shooting high or low because of a form "quirk" that I can't correct fast enough, playing with the sight extension is a quick fix, since I know what each detent on my extension does at different distances.

For outdoor shooting, you may really have to switch to a below the chin style anchor.
I can't see from here if your form is solid enough to make the transition (yet).

Viper1 out.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top