Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I went to an archery club last night (being the only girl there it was kind of nerve wracking but anyway).

So I was handed an 18lb recurve and shown the basics, stance, form etc.... Since Im a beginner I wasnt too shocked to get an 18lb... but everybody else in the club where shooting similar(ish) bow pounds (even the ones shooting 3 and 4 years). Then I was given a lecture on how anything higher and Im doing damage to my back and muscles....

So Im left wondering now about all these compounders who shoot 60lb and maybe ever higher? At first I thought it would just be a matter of building up to it.... but the archers there after 4 years are only on 30lb..?? What am I missing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,265 Posts
:confused: :bs:

:izza:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,792 Posts
I shot my first recurve in about 30 years, the other night. I shoot 70 lbs, with a 27" draw on a compound bow.

The recurve was a 45 lb draw, rated at a 28" drawlength. I couldn't get the string to even touch my face! I was about 3" from my face, that was all I could pull.

Compounds and traditional equipment are very different styles of shooting. The recurve I shot was a "shorter" bow, so the the weight "stacked" or built up very quick towards the end of the draw, compared to most compounds.

The draw weight issue was probably a good thing. If you start out light you can develop good form and habits that you won't have if you are over-bowed.

45 lbs on a compound is nothing, 45 lbs on that recurve was a hernia waiting to happen!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
Sounds like the club's emphasis is on developing good form, and that's a good thing. However, as you develop your archery muscles, along with your form, you should progress to higher draw weights as long as your form remains and the draw weight remains within your comfort zone. As for how long this takes, it really depends on your rate of development. Patience is sometimes (usually) a key element in developing good form.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I shot my first recurve in about 30 years, the other night. I shoot 70 lbs, with a 27" draw on a compound bow.

The recurve was a 45 lb draw, rated at a 28" drawlength. I couldn't get the string to even touch my face! I was about 3" from my face, that was all I could pull.

Compounds and traditional equipment are very different styles of shooting. The recurve I shot was a "shorter" bow, so the the weight "stacked" or built up very quick towards the end of the draw, compared to most compounds.

The draw weight issue was probably a good thing. If you start out light you can develop good form and habits that you won't have if you are over-bowed.

45 lbs on a compound is nothing, 45 lbs on that recurve was a hernia waiting to happen!:)
Ok thanks for that answer. It was really interesting. I knew that the compound "stored" energy to make it that bit easier to hold while you aim... But I didnt know that compounds make it easier to draw aswell. I assumed that if your 60lb on a compound then your 60lb on a recurve.

Im just going to ask one last question. If someone shoots 60lb on a compound roughly what poundage would that person need on a recurve..?? (even a good estimate).. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,131 Posts
Compounds are easier to hold because they have a let off in the range of 65-80 per cent. Which means at full draw you will be holding 20-35 per cent of the maxium draw weight. A traditional bow has no let off. You are holding the max weight for that bow at that draw length. To answer your question is it doesn't matter what weight of compound a person uses whether 60 or 70 pound. One needs to start out low in poundage 25-35 pounds. Two things hopefuly happen here. One is the shooter can improve his form and second is with the lower poundage one can shoot more. Hope this helps.
 

·
edthearcher
Joined
·
6,454 Posts
post

as a lady dont even dream about shooting a 60 lb recurve, that is unless you got arms on you bigger than most mens legs.
with a compound bow there are a lot of women shooting 50 lbs but not always the norm. my wife shoots 32 lbs indoors and 40 out doors
a compound works the reverse of a recurve
with a compound set at 60 lbs aprox the first 6 to 8 inches you are pulling back than it drops off rapidly to between 65 and 75 percent of the orignal draw weight
with a recurve set at 60 lbs you start out low and rapidly build up to 60 lbs at 28 inches this is termed as stacking
so go slow build up your back and arms you will do good
last but not least ENJOY
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,167 Posts
My recurve is 28lbs. My compound is 35lbs. I've been unable to shoot regulary but heck. I sure would not want to be holding a recurve as long as I hold the compound.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top