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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting ready to make some new cables. Is there an advantage to using one or the other. I know the Hoyts come with a soft yoke but Winner's Choice and other string companies make them the other way. Whats the difference in performance? If there is any.
 

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Hornet, I just went through this same thing on my pro-tec. First new string I tried was a hard yoke and it was a pain to get it set up where the limbs were not leaning. You have to twist one side or the other and make shure your ATA is the same on both sides of the bow. I don't like the set up at all, not on a Hoyt anyway. Cables are still twisting (not stretching) after 1000+ shots too. I just got a new one from Newberry and am very impressed with his work.:) He WILL make a floating yoke for you too. I got them for mine. He also has more options to choose from, and his prices are very reasonable. Good Luck. The hard cables (for some reason) slowed me down by 5 FPS too.
 

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You are asking about a floating yoke over a split yoke.
Hard to eliminate limb twist with floating yoke.
I prefer Split yoke. Differance is you won't be replacing bushings in cams with the split yoke vs. the floating yoke as often. Also less friction on cable servings when your cams aren't leaning equals a more efficient bow and less $$$ in the long run replacing cables.
 

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You can't eliminate limb twist.
Doesn't matter which kind of yoke you prefer.
While drawing the bow the pressure is wandering from the string groove to the cable groove of the cam.
The larger the cable groove is the longer is the amount of cablelength which gets rolled into and the more the cam tends to lean.
With a split yoke you can force the limbs to a leveled ATA length on both sides either at braceheight or fulldraw, not both of them.

Limb twisting is a common phenomenom at all compoundbows in history and who ever invents a camsystem without that torsion forces derserves the Nobel price.
So I like the floating yoke with the full amount of strands, giving the limb the opportunity to "self-center" itself anytime.

It's no problem for a well made limb to take this little torsion about thousands of times. I think the 3/4" design made by Hoyt makes a lot of sense here.

Markus
 

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Theres a thread on here somewhere about this same issue. And theres input from e. griggs and cousin dave. You might wanna take a look at it. I use to listen to a local guy from my club and he went on and on that the hard yoke is the only way blah blah blah. No wonder I could never tune my hoyts. I never should have listened to him. I put a soft yoke on my mathews even!! Lemme tell ya, I think it really makes a huge difference. Just my findings, but Im sticking with a soft yoke from now on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies.
 

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Mike, actually I believe the Hoyt sytem is most often refered to as a "floating" yoke, it is actually 2 strings hooked together at the base of the "Y" . A split yoke is in a fixed position and is made from 1 piece of string.
 
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